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Does Kickstarter work for the console gamer?
by A W on 04/04/13 09:35:00 am

The following blog post, unless otherwise noted, was written by a member of Gamasutra’s community.
The thoughts and opinions expressed are those of the writer and not Gamasutra or its parent company.

 

Everybody is saying the same thing these days. Gaming on consoles has gotten expencive, and they would rather deal with the PC and its Steam Sale prices for the Multiplatform goodness. Every time I'm on IGN and a game is anounce for Wii U, at least 2.5 people declair that they aren't buying a game that came out a year or 2 ago for full price (no matter the upgrades) because you can get it on steam for 5 dollars.  I found that one of the posters says it so much and in every game anouncement thread, that another called them out on it. My point is gamers are no longer willing to pay for gaming they way the have in the past.  Call it cheap ass gamer or what ever its becoming a meme and common to see the proclimation post on any release of any game wither new or old (more so on Wii U forums as of late).

So in comes Kickstarter to save the day... Right? What is Kickstarter? Well Kickstarter is a place where people with ideas can beg for a certain amount of money to get the job accomplished. They call it investing in the product and the return can be anything from the finshed product itself to extra perks when the product hits, etc.  It's a cart before the horse mentality that can make a ordinary fellow feel like they are are actively participating in the creation of something and that they have say so in what gets produced.  Wether this is a illusion or not is to be debated, but the truth is many small time game developers (and even some big ones) are jumping on the idea of using this as a means to develop and produce their games.

The problem with this... The empty or half promises theory.  Yesterday I was on IGN and a post came up about two possible games coming to the Wii U.  A journalist from NintendoEntusiast had apparently been speaking with some developers that had games in the works for PC, web browsers, and Smartphones.  Both of the games looked far along in development and had videos stating their history as developers and thier stories about the games and the developemt processes.  They where well put togeahter and looke like somenthing you would show of to venture capitalist if you where pitching an idea for them to invest in your product.  So what what is the problem with it all.  Well the journalist was entusiastic to hear that the two developers where considering bringing their product to the Wii U.  Considering... So say if I was to invest in this little game on the hopes and promises that it may someday come to a system I game on, I'm really out of luck and out of more than I would be for just and absloute game already on the Wii U e-shop. See the perk for one of the projects was just a giveaway of the actual game ON THE PC. This is a place where I do not game. Don't judge me, I have my reasons.

So all in all, I don't yet see Kickstarter as the answer for the console gamer, It s only the answer for the PC gamer and or the Steam budget cheep ass gamer. You know the gamer that always proclaimes that you can get your $60 dollar games on your console for $5 on a Steam sale, given that you poured $1000 dollars or more in to the super high end computer that can run them at good preformancess. Oh and you can possibly get it for free given you support the developer's Kickstarter campainge and they actually finished the game without the hickup of nasty bugs and glitches.

Sorry for any misspellings (This blog form code doesn't support Firefox / Google spell check... Odd?)


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