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David Klingler's Blog

 

I'm David Klingler, an independent game developer. I'm also a competitive gamer, game historian, game collector, game reseller, Scottish fiddler, composer, computer enthusiast, and moralist.

In December of 2012 I released my first game, Cool-B in Search of Floyd. It's a speed-based platformer with different levels every time about a cat, Cool-B, searching for his brother Floyd. The game is available for PC and Mac for free and on iOS and Android for $0.99.

My second game, Crashland, has released for iOS, Android, and Windows 8. Crashland is a simple and humorous small game about a squirrel named Gary catching acorns and causing carnage in the road. It's available for free on the App Store for iOS and for $0.99 on the Google Play Store for Android. There is also a free version available.

Currently working on a game called Signal to Noise. It's a music-driven rail/tube shooter that generates the game based on the music that's playing. The player can choose any song from their personal library to play in the game. Signal to Noise is currently available in alpha form on Desura.

My website is  http://www.solanimus.com

My twitter account is @Solanimus

 

Member Blogs

Posted by David Klingler on Tue, 05 Jun 2012 02:50:00 EDT in Production, Indie
The story of the emotional development of Cool-B in Search of Floyd.



David Klingler's Comments

Comment In: [Blog - 05/27/2015 - 01:13]

Nice article, Nick. I 've ...

Nice article, Nick. I 've considered this situation many times over the course of Signal to Noise, and with that game still not done, my desire to do a jam-size game on the side continues to grow. I managed two small games over my vacation for Christmas, however I only ...

Comment In: [Blog - 05/18/2015 - 06:54]

Hey David, r n r ...

Hey David, r n r nThat 's certainly a nice way of looking at it: how mother nature does it. I often feel that when playing really beautifully-designed games, it feels like the devs almost discovered the gameplay systems than having created them, and I 've always thought that it ...

Comment In: [News - 05/11/2015 - 04:00]

Thanks for this article, Alex. ...

Thanks for this article, Alex. After almost destroying myself during development of my first game, and having a much worse game for that reason, I 'm always a vocal supporter of balance in work and life. I still struggle with it myself, though.

Comment In: [Blog - 05/06/2015 - 02:43]

Behavior that is corrosive to ...

Behavior that is corrosive to our industry shouldn 't be incentivized. r n r nSays the guy flaming a developer in a comments section with expletives. r n r nWhich is a bigger problem People dislike our industry more because of people that act like that, not for people that ...

Comment In: [Blog - 05/05/2015 - 01:22]

Thanks for that, Brett. It ...

Thanks for that, Brett. It 's never a bad thing to share among other devs challenges like this. I had typed a rant in this comment box of one of my own stories before realizing it might be best to just say, I understand you.

Comment In: [Blog - 05/05/2015 - 01:22]

I think that what you ...

I think that what you 're saying is true, however there 's quite a lot of information missing when explaining the other side. There are a good number of reasons someone might use a custom engine outside of Unity, Unreal, Source, CryEngine, or anything like that. Besides, sometimes a custom ...