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Reid Kimball's Blog   Expert Blogs

 

Reid Bryant Kimball - video game designer in Eugene, OR - is a versatile designer focused on creating compelling Triple-E player experiences and growing developers' sales by ensuring all players have access to those experiences through game accessibility features.

A proven innovator of closed-captioning for games, Reid has said, “Game accessibility means games for all, allowing developers to reach the broadest audience possible, increasing sales and empowering more people.”

With over 13 years of experience in video game design and development (including modding), Reid understands the power of video games to be a catalyst for change. He uses his creativity and vision for video games to help people reach their full potential by creating Triple-E experiences that educate, engage and empower people to improve themselves and the world around them.

He can be contacted via email: reid [at] rbkdesign [dot] com.

Or followed on Twitter.com @reidkimball

 

Expert Blogs

Posted by Reid Kimball on Mon, 24 Jan 2011 07:00:00 EST in Production
Please share your experiences with Unity Asset Server.


Posted by Reid Kimball on Mon, 21 Jun 2010 06:00:00 EDT in Audio, Design, Programming, Art
Reid Bryant Kimball edits a video of Heavy Rain to envision what it might look like with full closed captioning.


Posted by Reid Kimball on Mon, 03 May 2010 07:00:00 EDT in Audio, Design, Programming, Production, Art
Appallingly, but not surprisingly, Microsoft, like other huge US corporations contracts with factories in foreign countries that exploit and abuse the working poor for their own profit and your gaming pleasure.


Posted by Reid Kimball on Tue, 30 Mar 2010 10:00:00 EDT in Audio, Design, Programming, Production, Art
Reid Bryant Kimball talks about how video game employers may be using illegal internships more frequently.


Posted by Reid Kimball on Sun, 21 Feb 2010 09:00:00 EST in Design
Reid Bryant Kimball recaps briefly Jesse Schell's thought provoking talk at this year's D.I.C.E conference. Not a fan of potential future of games, he wonders if game developers will create games to make people better consumers, or better contributors.


Posted by Reid Kimball on Sun, 10 Jan 2010 03:00:00 EST in Production
Given the revelations of the extensive overtime employees of Rockstar San Diego are subjected to, Reid Bryant Kimball discusses how we can position ourselves to better stand up for our rights.



Reid Kimball's Comments

Comment In: [News - 06/08/2012 - 11:49]

This is why I no ...

This is why I no longer develop AAA games. They haven 't grown up with me.

Comment In: [Feature - 10/25/2011 - 04:45]

Well said. I agree. I ...

Well said. I agree. I think it shows more professionalism and passion if someone points out that their performance will suffer if they work beyond their limits.

Comment In: [News - 04/29/2011 - 01:00]

Question is, which crime fighting ...

Question is, which crime fighting unit is best the handle the job Hacking a video game network doesn't sound like national security is being threatened.

Comment In: [Feature - 01/26/2011 - 04:30]

@Alexander: Jane says in her ...

@Alexander: Jane says in her book that fun comes from voluntary work, not work pushed on us by others. Just started reading the book and am enjoying it. One thing I want to know more about is that she talks about negative stress and positive stress aka eustress and says ...

Comment In: [Blog - 01/24/2011 - 07:00]

Hi Jesse Thanks for the ...

Hi Jesse Thanks for the feedback. Definitely makes me feel better coming from someone I know. Cheers.

Comment In: [Feature - 12/23/2010 - 04:50]

Very nice piece Dennis. I've ...

Very nice piece Dennis. I've done a few game accessibility projects Doom 3 CC and didn't know vibrating phones were developed first to help the deaf and hard of hearing. It makes perfect sense though.