Gamasutra: The Art & Business of Making Gamesspacer
Reflection on games culture
Printer-Friendly VersionPrinter-Friendly Version
View All     RSS
April 16, 2014
arrowPress Releases
April 16, 2014
PR Newswire
View All
View All     Submit Event





If you enjoy reading this site, you might also want to check out these UBM TechWeb sites:


 
Reflection on games culture
by Sjors Jansen on 02/10/14 04:28:00 pm

The following blog post, unless otherwise noted, was written by a member of Gamasutra’s community.
The thoughts and opinions expressed are those of the writer and not Gamasutra or its parent company.

 

In the past month:

- King trademarks candy and saga. news
- We have a jam as a protest. news
- Then the dungeon keeper f2p has ridiculous constraints. news
- And we spend an entire week talking about it. news
- Then flappy bird is released and becomes a hit. news
- We talk about it for another week and are so outraged the creator decides to take it down. news
- Then we have a jam as support. news

 

Please consider:

Are these the issues we care about?
Is this worth our attention?

How will the world look at games and games culture if this is what moves us? If this is what keeps us busy?

 


Related Jobs

Treyarch / Activision
Treyarch / Activision — Santa Monica, California, United States
[04.16.14]

Associate Producer - Treyarch
Treyarch / Activision
Treyarch / Activision — Santa Monica, California, United States
[04.16.14]

Production Coordinator (temporary) - Treyarch
Vicarious Visions / Activision
Vicarious Visions / Activision — Albany, New York, United States
[04.16.14]

Software Engineer-Vicarious Visions
Sledgehammer Games / Activision
Sledgehammer Games / Activision — Foster City, California, United States
[04.16.14]

Desktop Support Technician, Temporary - Sledgehammer Games






Comments


Zachary Strebeck
profile image
I think the problem is that "games culture" is not a singular unit. There are factions everywhere, those who love Flappy Bird and those who hate it, those who support strong IP rights and those who don't approve of them, etc. It's the ebb and flow that you're seeing and pointing out there, and I think that is a good thing. Discussions like these, when they are reasonable and level-headed, only serve to educate both gamers and "experts," like myself, on different attitudes and ways of thinking. I, for one, love it!

Sjors Jansen
profile image
Hi Zachary,

true enough but "games culture" is perceived and presented as a whole. Doesn't the same apply to politics, or business, or press?
The discussions are fine of course, I participated in it myself. But I did start to wonder why we are talking and spending energy on these subjects instead of perhaps something more relevant to the world as a whole.
Different people will have different opinions on this of course. But hopefully it does good to take a step back and reflect.


(For me personally it resulted in sharing a game concept about a home for the elderly in Berlin that's surrounded by billboards for funeral services, gravestones and has a gigantic graveyard next to it: http://dromedarydreams.com/blog/february_minijam_design_concept/2
014-02-09-31 )


none
 
Comment: