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November 18, 2018
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Gregory Pellechi's Member Blogs

Posted by Gregory Pellechi on Fri, 10 Aug 2018 09:17:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Serious, Indie, Social/Online, Smartphone/Tablet
Ever wish you could jump to an early part of a game's story to see what happened? Well there's a good reason that doesn't happen - progression. Time and progress are constraints on narratives that most designers aren't immediately aware of.


Posted by Gregory Pellechi on Mon, 23 Jul 2018 12:09:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Serious, Indie
Comedy is often considered a genre, but comedy only implies that it'll make you laugh. Problem is, it doesn't guarantee that. Which is why comedy should never be considered your game's genre.


Posted by Gregory Pellechi on Mon, 09 Jul 2018 01:37:00 EDT in Design, Production, Console/PC, Indie, Social/Online
They may be derided as trash daytime TV but soap operas have a lot to teach us about continually creating content. There are plenty of lessons for the video game industry, especially when it comes to games with stories.


Posted by Gregory Pellechi on Fri, 22 Jun 2018 10:22:00 EDT in Design, Production, Console/PC, Indie
Writing a video game shares some similarities to writing for TV or film, but there's a lot more to take into account. That's why you need to make a model for your team to understand how to utilize everything you've written. Or it won't be in the game.


Posted by Gregory Pellechi on Mon, 11 Jun 2018 11:39:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Indie
You got a game, it has a story... but what are its themes and what are you trying say with it? Themes help evoke that feeling your after whether its isolation or a power fantasy, here's how to go about finding, strengthening and supporting your themes.


Posted by Gregory Pellechi on Fri, 08 Jun 2018 10:48:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Serious, Indie, Social/Online
You got a game, it's got a story but what's your message and how are your themes supporting all of that? Here we'll examine how to find, strengthen and support your themes to make them do more. And make your game memorable as a result.


Posted by Gregory Pellechi on Fri, 25 May 2018 09:48:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Indie
Procedural generation is great at short scenes. But it takes a storyteller to create a compelling narrative that runs throughout an entire game. And it's stories we remember - not graphics, mechanics or systems.


Posted by Gregory Pellechi on Tue, 15 May 2018 09:43:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Indie
Growth and change come from breaking out of our loops, for games and their stories this can be hard. But not all change has to be related to the gameplay loop. There are other ways to express it in the story and characters of your game.


Posted by Gregory Pellechi on Fri, 27 Apr 2018 09:14:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Indie
Quests are meant to tell stories, to show how a character or world changes. But video games seem intent on keeping that from happening. Even the lowly fetch quest can be the fulcrum for a character arc or world-shifting events.


Posted by Gregory Pellechi on Thu, 19 Apr 2018 09:44:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Indie
Games as power fantasies result in success after success for player character. For the story that makes them boring because the characters never encounter failure and have to change track. A Try/Fail cycle is vital to interesting storytelling in games.


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