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Lewis Pulsipher's Comments

Comment In: [Blog - 08/06/2015 - 12:43]

I think Rickard has it ...

I think Rickard has it right. r n r nA very different way to express this might be, does the developer treat the player only as a means to an end, or does the developer treat the player as an end in him/herself Kant 's form of the Golden Rule: ...

Comment In: [Blog - 07/20/2015 - 02:30]

If the game design strongly ...

If the game design strongly encourages turtling, good players will turtle, whether they 're naturally aggressive or defensive. r n r nTurtling is usually undesirable in games for more than two sides, but there 's nothing inherently bad about it. I always laugh when someone is called a camper as ...

Comment In: [Blog - 06/19/2015 - 06:01]

Fundamentally, supply and demand dictate ...

Fundamentally, supply and demand dictate that game prices will fall, because more and more games are published each year. If a game costs more than someone wants to pay, it 's pretty easy to find cheaper alternatives simply because there are so many games trying to get your attention. r ...

Comment In: [News - 05/18/2015 - 04:07]

1. The word educational has ...

1. The word educational has bad connotations in the USA though not in Germany . Educational equals work, dull work at that. Educational game is an oxymoron, to most people. r n r n2. Perhaps this is generational. Hard to know. r n r n3. Serious game academics are convinced ...

Comment In: [Blog - 04/20/2015 - 01:22]

Ultimately, the programmed opponent at ...

Ultimately, the programmed opponent at least, as programmed nowadays is predictable. Behavior of a programmed opponent with randomization can be predicted in ways that one cannot for a good human opponent. Weaker human opponents may be predictable in the same way that programmed opponents are usually predictable. A computer opponent ...

Comment In: [Blog - 03/30/2015 - 01:30]

Stratego, let 's say, is ...

Stratego, let 's say, is very much a hidden information game. But it 's not a particularly deep game, and is quite transparent. The strategy and tactics are fairly obvious. r n r nNo no, it 's not a matter of not learning the rules in Britannia. Britannia rules are ...

Comment In: [Blog - 12/01/2014 - 01:17]

I suspect our differences come ...

I suspect our differences come partly from what games we make. I strongly prefer games with human opposition, and more than two players but at least two . There 's more variability in these games than in single-player. and the interaction between humans is less predictable than interaction between human ...

Comment In: [Blog - 11/10/2014 - 02:16]

Links to discussions of the ...

Links to discussions of the effects of advantage and disadvantage, which vary with the kind of number high or medium you 're trying to achieve. Certainly it isn 's 25 . r n r nIt 's a really clever mechanic, if you understand it correctly. r n r nhttp://tabletopterrors.com/2014/10/16/advantage-disadvantage-and-beyond-the-true-odds-of-extra-d20s-by-kerne-fahey/ r ...

Comment In: [Blog - 10/15/2014 - 02:02]

If your game is a ...

If your game is a continuous series of events that lead causally from one to the other, then you are maximizing the amount of unique situations that can occur. I think this idea is counter-intuitive to many, who think that random events occurring somewhere in there must increase the amount ...

Comment In: [Blog - 12/17/2013 - 05:18]

Much of the discussion of ...

Much of the discussion of game design theory hinges on semantics. Unfortunately, trying to define win and lose is hopeless simply because of differing perceptions of game players. r n r nFor example, let s take one of the most competitive games in existence, the boardgame Diplomacy. Draws are quite ...

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