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High Moon Shining: Inside Sierra's San Diego Outpost
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High Moon Shining: Inside Sierra's San Diego Outpost


September 21, 2007 Article Start Previous Page 10 of 11 Next
 

Are you moving the studio toward multiple projects simultaneously? Is that something you want to move towards?

PDP: Absolutely.

Is there a lot of staffing up that has to happen for that, or is it a question of fragmenting departments?

PDP: There is growth. You want to be smart about how you grow. It's key to getting that right chemistry in your game mechanics and vision, and personally I'd like to see us spend a lot more time up front on making something fun and cool from a consumer perspective, and then apply resources to go into full production. Part of the business side of having multiple teams is using your resources as efficiently as possible, since you'll have people move onto a second project as they finish up on another project.

High Moon was identified with original IP earlier on. Is that something that can be carried forward? Is that something that's important to the future of the studio?

PDP: Absolutely. IP creation has more value for Vivendi Games than licensing, but licensing has its place. Having original IP as well as licenses helps round and balance the portfolio risk. Part of the attraction to High Moon by Vivendi in the first place was their ability to create original IP, as with Darkwatch.


High Moon's Wild West-themed supernatural shooter Darkwatch

Where do you see High Moon in the next five years?

PDP: [We'll have] multiple teams, and a balanced portfolio of original IP as well as licensed IP. I see High Moon viewed as a top-tier, premier development studio known for making great games.

Any interest in handhelds at this point?

PDP: There is an interest in handhelds. When we talk about IP, we talk about franchises, and establishing strong franchises means multiple platforms. That doesn't necessarily end with the complexity of the current platforms that are out there.

What plays well on a DS isn't necessarily going to play well on the PS3 or the 360. I think we won't be looking just to port to multiple platforms; we'll be looking to develop IP and create franchises on multiple platforms, which doesn't necessarily mean that we'll do all those platforms under one roof.

Is there any interest in the Wii?

PDP: There's a lot of interest. You have to give credit for Nintendo for having a platform that is innovative, fun, and provides a new avenue of innovation that most people underappreciated until they actually hit the marketplace. We're looking at the Wii and doing stuff for the Wii very closely.


Article Start Previous Page 10 of 11 Next

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