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Collaborative Game Editing

May 20, 2009 Article Start Page 1 of 4 Next
 

 [Individual game developers take responsibilities for different parts of game development - sometimes leading to content mixups and bottlenecks where their work overlaps. In this  in-depth article, originally published in Game Developer magazine, Mick West discusses how collaborative editing may be the future.]

Game development teams are getting quite large. The largest teams can have more than a hundred developers working on a game at any one point in the process. Yet many developers still use work practices that revolve around individuals taking the entire responsibility for large chunks of the game.

For many things, such as the creation of the 3D models and textures for individual game objects, this is still quite reasonable. However, for the creation of large game levels and continuous game worlds, this can create problems and it is worth investigating methods of content creation that are more collaborative in nature.

This article takes a look at some of the issues involved, and discusses a few technical problems from the tool programmer's perspective.

Code Conflicts and Bottlenecks

When multiple people are working on overlapping aspects of a game, there are two problems that arise: edit conflicts and edit bottlenecks. These problems are two sides of the same coin. Fixing edit conflicts can create edit bottlenecks, and vice versa.

An edit conflict happens when two people edit the same thing at the same time and their changes create two conflicting versions. The nature of this problem depends on how fine-grained the "things" are in the game being developed.

Programmers have always had this problem when two of them work on the same area of code at the same time. If both programmers make changes to the same file, an edit conflict occurs, and it needs to be resolved.

Generally, programmers will not be working on the exact same line of code, but rather will work on separate tasks, which use code that overlaps in various files. When a programmer wants to make a change to a file, he or she will check it out from the version control system (VCS), edit it until the changes are working, and then check it back into VCS.

The problem of code edit conflicts can be handled by allowing only one programmer to check out a particular file at one time (this is typically a setting in the VCS software). Since only one programmer can edit the code at a given time, there can never be an edit conflict. However, we still get bounced over to the other side of the problem -- the edit bottleneck.

An edit bottleneck occurs when two people want to edit the same thing at the same time, yet person B cannot edit it because person A is editing it. With code, this is particularly problematic when large sections of functionality are incorporated in key files (typically with rather overarching names, like: "player.cpp" or "globals.cpp"), which affect many areas of the game and need many changes.

The common solution is to allow for multiple checkouts. Thus, more than one person is allowed to check out the same file at the same time. They make their changes, and then check the file back in. If the changes conflict, then they have to be merged. This step can usually be done automatically, but occasionally it requires a little manual intervention. Sometimes programmers end up editing the exact same piece of code and have to actually talk to each other to figure out a solution.

Some programmers prefer to structure things in such a way that multiple checkouts are never required. Theoretically, we can achieve this solution by making individual code files as small as is practical, splitting up files that contain multiple functionality, and establishing programmer procedures for rapid iterations, minimizing the length of time files can be checked out.

In practice a combination of efficient code division and multiple checkouts is commonly used. While edit conflicts can occasionally create problems, these can generally be mitigated by keeping a reasonable amount of functional separation in your code organization, and ensuring programmers check in (or merge) their code reasonably often.

The problem of edit bottlenecks can stop programmers in their tracks, or at least seriously cramp their programming options, and the occasional problem caused by an edit conflict is well worth the extra flexibility that simultaneous editing can provide.


Article Start Page 1 of 4 Next

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