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Exclusive: Yuji Naka's New Bird
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Exclusive: Yuji Naka's New Bird


May 5, 2010 Article Start Previous Page 2 of 3 Next
 

When we last spoke to you, you mentioned a "Sonic-like platform game" in the works. Is that Ivy the Kiwi? that game, or are you working on something else still?

YN: That's another title and not Ivy the Kiwi?. Unfortunately, we had to stop development for the time being for the "Sonic-like platform game." However, we are in the process of developing another action game right now.

For Ivy, Why did you go with Windows Mobile instead of iPhone at first?

YN: During development, Windows Mobile had a pressure-sensitive type interface while iPhone's electrostatic type didn't work well using a stylus. We thought perhaps the users may hurt their fingers from the friction by playing the game so we decided to go with the Windows phone.

However, Windows phones now have electrostatic type touch panels too and users ended up playing Ivy with their fingers anyways, so maybe we should release it on iPhone as well.

This started as a mobile game, but also spans DS and Wii. How important are multiplatform games to Prope?

Also, how important is it to stick to the advantages of a platform when making a game? I.e. DS and Wii both have pointing mechanisms, whereas PS3 or 360 do not (yet), so Ivy might not work there.

YN: At Prope we never limit ourselves to a certain platform, and always choose whichever platform is the best fit for the idea we have. For Ivy the Kiwi? we considered which platform would be best for the game.

We thought it would be fun if we could have it for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, but it'd be difficult to simulate that same feeling of control with those platforms. We may be able to use the motion controllers, but the machine would be able to read the player's location but not the position on the screen.

In the future when there's new hardware it will be fun to release an updated version with the same feeling of control, but I would like to create a new game instead for those consoles if given the opportunity.

What platforms most excite you right now, and why?

YN: Right now I'm really interested in the Nintendo 3DS.

The in-game world has evolved so much since 3D was first introduced. However, at the same time since there's depth it became difficult to determine the success and failure range, and action games had a more difficult time expressing the fun aspects of the genre. I'm curious if Nintendo 3DS can solve this issue.

Character action games aren't as popular as they once were. Do you think they can come back, or do we need to explore new avenues?

YN: I personally think the character action game is the most fun genre, and I wish to keep at it so that I can create an action game that makes everyone excited again.

Sonic the Hedgehog. Ivy the Kiwi. The titles are similar in format. Coincidence? And why a question mark at the end of "Ivy the Kiwi?"

YN: This wasn't a coincidence. As we created this new "Ivy" character, I wanted to have the same direct and simple title, like Sonic.

Regarding the question mark, that's a secret (laughs). I think you'll understand the meaning behind it once you finish the game, so I look forward to having people figure it out on their own.


Article Start Previous Page 2 of 3 Next

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