Gamasutra: The Art & Business of Making Gamesspacer
View All     RSS
October 22, 2014
arrowPress Releases
October 22, 2014
PR Newswire
View All





If you enjoy reading this site, you might also want to check out these UBM Tech sites:


Finally, games are moving away from movies and finding their own language
Finally, games are moving away from movies and finding their own language Exclusive
July 10, 2012 | By Staff

July 10, 2012 | By Staff
Comments
    2 comments
More: Console/PC, Design, Exclusive



In a new feature article, writer and designer Tadhg Kelly examines how the maxim "show, don't tell" needs to evolve for the interactive age into "play, don't show" -- empowering gamers in its wake.

"One of the great lessons in film, which took a generation to learn, is 'show, don't tell,'" writes Kelly.

"The earliest silent movies often used prompt cards and staged sets to tell stories. When talkies came along, the cards went, yet the sense of staging did not," he observes.

"Starting with Citizen Kane and some others, and then evolving into the New Wave, filmmakers started to realize that they weren't making recorded theater."

By the 1970s, he writes, the landscape had changed forever. "Directors like Kubrick, Scorsese, Coppolla, and Lucas showed what cinema could really do, and everything was different after that.

"I see a similar situation in games, except where cinema used many of the conventions of theater, games use many of the conventions of cinema. We're passing through an era of 'filmed games,' just as film passed through its era of 'staged films.' And just as the lesson to learn in film was 'show, don't tell,' the lesson in games is 'play, don't show,'" writes Kelly.

He argues that Left 4 Dead is the best-designed game of the last five years particularly because it follows this new maxim. "It ties its gameplay into its storysense through limiting simple things like your ability to stand up when knocked over. And after playing a session or two you soon realize that you can't leave a man behind. You will be overwhelmed."

The full feature, in which he tackles the thorny issue of why many designs envision player characters in a way that is contradictory to the nature of the medium, is live now on Gamasutra.


Related Jobs

Petroglyph Games
Petroglyph Games — Las Vegas, Nevada, United States
[10.21.14]

Illustrator / Concept Artist
DoubleDown Interactive
DoubleDown Interactive — Seattle, Washington, United States
[10.21.14]

Game Designer
Zindagi Games
Zindagi Games — Camarillo, California, United States
[10.21.14]

MOBILE Art Director
Treyarch / Activision
Treyarch / Activision — Santa Monica, California, United States
[10.21.14]

Senior UI Artist (temporary) Treyarch










Comments


Stuart Leslie
profile image
It wasn't until games like Half Life came along that this was an issue. Prior to that, games were 'play, don't show'.

Bob Johnson
profile image
Yeah, movies became less like theatre the more the tech improved. Games have become less game-like the more the tech improved.


none
 
Comment: