Gamasutra: The Art & Business of Making Gamesspacer
View All     RSS
October 31, 2014
arrowPress Releases
October 31, 2014
PR Newswire
View All





If you enjoy reading this site, you might also want to check out these UBM Tech sites:


Learn to let your directors work on new IPs, or risk losing them
Learn to let your directors work on new IPs, or risk losing them
September 20, 2012 | By Eric Caoili




"Movie directors create all sorts of movies, and the movie industry is healthy. I wish the game industry was like that as well."
- Sonic the Hedgehog co-creator Yuji Naka criticizes the game industry's tendency to stick their directors on the same hit property for years, instead of letting them create and work on new properties.

It's something we've seen with a lot of prominent Japanese developers, like Eiji Aonuma on The Legend of Zelda series, Hideo Kojima on the Metal Gear franchise, and Katsuhiro Harada on the Tekken games.

Naka says that's one of the reasons why he left Sega several years ago to form Prope: "If I stayed there, I would have had to just make Sonic games. Right now I don't have to make Sonic anymore, so I'm enjoying that freedom a lot."

How many other designers and directors have left their jobs in order to get away from working on the same franchise again and again? Why can't more developers learn to let other team members take over the reins for a series?

And are developers missing out on opportunities to let directors bring their fanbases to a new IP?


Related Jobs

InnoGames GmbH
InnoGames GmbH — Hamburg, Germany
[10.31.14]

Mobile Developer C++ (m/f)
The College of New Jersey
The College of New Jersey — Ewing, New Jersey, United States
[10.31.14]

Assistant Professor - Interactive Multi Media - Tenure Track
Next Games
Next Games — Helsinki, Finland
[10.31.14]

Senior Level Designer
Activision Publishing
Activision Publishing — Santa Monica, California, United States
[10.31.14]

Tools Programmer-Central Team










Comments


Uzoma Okeke
profile image
It's not even just the risk of losing your directors. I feel that many gamers get tired of getting the same old game with a new twist, a new story, and the same old stuff packed into it. Reused IPs tend to lose their appeal once they get abused. The sad thing is that most of their sales don't prove this.

I guess it's kind of a reliability vs. innovation conflict?


none
 
Comment: