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New service lets you track the competition's mobile game downloads
New service lets you track the competition's mobile game downloads
October 18, 2012 | By Eric Caoili

October 18, 2012 | By Eric Caoili
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    7 comments
More: Smartphone/Tablet, Business/Marketing



Tracking the mobile game downloads of your competitors and other developers can be difficult unless they decide to release those details themselves, but there's a new app that will give you a peek at their numbers.

Analytics firm Distimo has launched a new service called AppIQ that provides subscribers valuable data like estimated downloads and revenue (including in-app purchases) for iOS and Android applications in 40 countries.

It could be a particularly useful tool for studios scouting a specific game type, as they can not only check how other developers are performing and analyze their market share, but also see how price changes, featured listings, and version updates affected competitors' downloads in order to plan their own marketing campaigns.

AppIQ provides information on revenue generation according to business models, countries, and platforms, too. When developers connect their game to AppIQ to compare their performance, the service excludes that app's transactional data in order to ensure confidentiality.

The company based all of its estimates on transactional data from over 120,000 applications plugged into its Distimo Monitor tracking service. It claims to have a margin of error below 3 percent for more than half of the apps (54 percent) it tracks, and below 10 percent for almost all apps (95 percent).

The group has also released Distimo Leaderboard, which allows customers to analyze the top apps in every country, category, and app store. The service supports Apple App and Mac App Store, Google Play, Amazon Appstore, Windows Phone 7 Marketplace, and others.

Developers can use Distimo Leaderboard to identify which apps are currently the most popular and which are growing in popularity, as well as see how many downloads are needed in a given day to break into a platform's rankings.


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Comments


Rob Graeber
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So Distimo is "estimating" the data, while it also has tracking on competitor apps that allows Distimo to know how close their "estimates" are and adjust their "estimates" even closer over time.

Pretty big incentive to never use Distimo for regular app tracking.

Remco van den Elzen
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Rob, we have a unique methodology that prevents this from happening: when estimating downloads and revenues for apps, we always exclude that appís transactional data from the analysis to preserve the confidentiality of our usersí data.

If you are interested in reading more about our methodology, you can do so here: http://www.distimo.com/market-data#methodology

Thanks!

Alex Nichiporchik
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Estimating AND verifying. Sold!

So they'd probably mine the ranking and compare those rankings with the apps with their tracking installed and adjust.

I wonder how it works for IAP-powered games

Rob Graeber
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So how are you verifying that your estimates have below a 3% margin of error?

Remco van den Elzen
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Rob, after estimating all apps in the entire store, we check the accuracy of our data for the apps that we do have data for.

Rob Graeber
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So you're checking your estimates against actual app data, then adjusting your model to become more accurate. Effectively it's the same thing.

What's the difference between selling someone's data vs selling an estimate of their data with a model derived from their actual app data?

I think it's highly unethical you are accessing your user's data in non-aggregate. Much less to derive estimation models to sell to their competitors.

Jeremy Alessi
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Very interesting, all these services are mining tremendous amounts of data.

I remember reading all the charts in 2008 and just eyeballing it. I'd make a prediction about what rank I could get an app to by jumping categories and be spot on. Apple won't let you change categories without an update now. It's a whole new ball game that's primarily based on taking advantage of these external services.


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