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PlayStation 4: Five takeaways for developers Exclusive
PlayStation 4: Five takeaways for developers
February 20, 2013 | By Frank Cifaldi

February 20, 2013 | By Frank Cifaldi
Comments
    44 comments
More: Console/PC, Business/Marketing, Exclusive



Sony's unveiling of the PlayStation 4 has ended and, while we've still got a lot of questions before we tell you all to think about developing for it, the company did impress us with its initiatives to make game development -- and game discovery -- easier.

Below are five key takeaways we're walking away with -- five potential reasons for developers to be excited by the PlayStation 4.

1. Accessible Architecture

We were all pleased to hear that the PlayStation 4's CPU will be X86-based. The platform maker notorious for inaccessible hardware has committed itself to a CPU that almost any PC game developer can jump right into, wih a GPU that is also PC-based (we're told it's an "enhanced PC GPU," whatever that means).

2. Powerful Tech

Sony is a using a lot of iPhone-like buzzwords about "simplicity" and how it "just works," but that extends to developers too. It's pumping 8GB of memory into the console, promising developers enough horsepower to have their way with the system and be less inhibited by limitations. Of course, we've heard that about every console ever released, but it's hard to deny that 8GB sounds like a great move. And the required hard drive doesn't hurt, either.

Don't miss: The first details on the PlayStation 4

3. Smarter Discoverability

Discoverability is becoming a key concern for game developers, and Sony knows it. The company is hinting at a discovery system based more on social connectivity -- aka, what a player's connections are playing -- than on its traditional platform-controlled storefront.

But more than that, its acquisition of Gaikai and its cloud streaming tech means that players will be able to broadcast and share their activity, meaning games with viral potential may be seen by more eyes than traditional marketing and store placement would put them in front of.

"The goal is to make every game discoverable," Gaikai's David Perry said.

Don't miss: How Sony's PlayStation 4 will leverage Gaikai's cloud

4. No More Demo Development?

Speaking of Gaikai, the company is promising that any PlayStation 4 game can be launched instantly over the cloud. In theory, this could free developers from the expense of having to ship a demo version of a game ever again. Why bother, when you've got servers delivering timed demos of the full game?

5. Keeping Old Games Alive

Gaikai's vision for what it's calling the PlayStation Cloud is to have "everything everywhere." Part of this initiative, it says, is to keep games from Sony's previous PlayStation consoles available to purchase over the cloud. It could be good news for rights holders out there who still have a back catalog worth exploring.


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Comments


James Coote
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If you can use your own smartphone/tablet to connect to PS4 games, that'd be really exciting for me, though they kinda breezed over that in favour of how they really wanted that second screen to be your PS Vita

Leon T
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The first 2 and half are pretty great, but the last 2 and half are iffy. I didn't like streaming games the first time around so hopfully it will be better now. Sony better hope more people are willing to give streaming more of chance with them as well.

Jimmy Albright
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In my state to get above the necessary 3mb upload I'd have to pay $200.00 a month for a 55/5 connection. Not too excited about the streaming capabilities since internet in my state is shit.

James Coote
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No mention of blu-ray, but plenty on cloud, stream and downloading games. Another nail in retail's coffin?

Jeferson Soler
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@ James Coote - Perhaps, and while I prefer physical copies, after seeing Tecmo Koei's strategy on releasing the Fist of the North Star game for the Wii U as a digital download exclusive, I have to say that it was a smart move on the company's part as I'm beginning to see that the digital download strategy may become a safe haven for 3rd party companies when it comes to releasing niche titles.

Christian Nutt
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No mention in the presentation, but the system does have a Blu-ray drive.

Ron Dippold
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Two more takeaways pointed out by someone else I will leave anonymous unless he wants to chime in.

Instant resume, which all games must support, isn't always as easy as it sounds. There were a lot of gotchas on the DS. Depends on how much the OS does for you. But even if the OS does most of it, can all libraries and all your own code handle 24 hour (or more) instant jumps? Okay, how is that any different than a game dealing with hibernation or sleep on a PC? It's not, but I can't help but notice a lot of games do not deal with that well. It's certainly not impossible, just something you need to consider.

The promised ability to start playing a game while it's downloading (separate from streaming it entirely via Gaikai) may require some consideration for your resources packaging. Some of this could be automated by having software monitor disk usage while your game is booted, while first level is loaded, etc, to see exactly which bits are required to start play then generate a download map. In fact the best thing to do would be to combine all that data from all your QA/playtesting. But if it's not automated, you'll have to plan for it. And even if it's automated, maybe you'll have to plan to minimize the sprawl.

Neither are horrible, just new concerns most people aren't currently dealing with.

Adam Bishop
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Doesn't Steam already allow you to begin playing partially downloaded games?

Ron Dippold
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@Adam - I've never been able to, and I do most of my PC gaming through Steam. It never goes to 'ready to play' for me until it's all down. I could be missing an option.

However you certainly can with most (?) Blizzard games. Their downloader has the little red, yellow, and green zones. Yellow means you can start, maybe have some hiccups, green means you can start and shouldn't even notice.

Benjamin Quintero
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This conferences was clearly focused on the core gamer which is great, I hope the message continues and doesn't devolve into slap-stick party games by E3. Color me impressed so far. x86 CPU, PC-class GPU, 8GB RAM all sound like a recipe for some pretty sweet gaming in the future. I'm just going to assume that the 8GB is shared memory architecture, but that is still a bounty of bits to play with.

john talbot
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the most memorable part of tonight's presser was also the most embarrassing, as Metzen -- who was caught so flat-footed as he stuttered his way off the stage -- announced Diablo 3 to a comically indifferent audience.

i genuinely felt sorry for him as he stood there expecting his announcement to bring down the roof. = (

james sadler
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Yeah I was amazed by that presentation. Yes they're bringing a game that's already out to an audience that wont want to play it on a console a long time after its initial launch. Why they were one of the last presenters is amazing. Was just as bad as Square Enix showing the same video they've been showing for the last year or so.

Michael DeFazio
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call me a conspiracy theorist... but:

when I played D3, I kept asking myself why they seemed to "streamline" many of the RPG-esque "customization and loot" elements and (at the time) I thought:

"maybe they streamlined it so they could port it to consoles (with a gamepad)"

fwiw i thought D3 was OK (nothing great) but seemed like Blizzard tried hard to make it "all things to all people" and they really focused on keeping things moving (action oriented) compared to the previous 2 installments.

GameViewPoint Developer
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"Microsoft will need to really drop the ball to do worse."

To me dropping the ball, would be just releasing a high powered PC in a slick box, enhanced Xbox live and remote play...because Sony just announced all of that. What's it all going to come down to? who has managed to sign who up for exclusive games? MS needs to go further than Sony has dared to go, in all those areas.

Harlan Sumgui
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@gvp dev:
exclusives (timed or otherwise) will be the nail in sony's coffin. It's a shame that the the coming war will be won via moneyhatting and not on compelling services and hardware. c'est la vie.

John Flush
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The biggest thing that came out of this announcement is they revealed the fact the game was local multiplayer. I'm constantly looking for games I can play with people that live under the same roof as me. It got me very intrigued.

Jimmy Albright
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Honestly maybe my expectations were high but I closed my livestream feeling a little unimpressed.


(incoming rant you've been WARNED! )

I'm not excited at all for PC hardware that shows me how real they can make an old mans face look. The technology is impressive, but I'd expect that at an Nvidia demo not the PS4 announcement. They finally changed the controller and added a seemingly kinect-like peripheral, but spent less than 3 minutes actually talking about it. After that, Sony then goes on to praise themselves about being the "leaders in innovation."

While the streaming functionality is cool for a lot of people, the fastest internet I can buy in my state is a 22/2 pipe, unless I want to fork out $200.00 a month for the newly released (and unstable) 55/5 connection. I've tried running twitch/justin.tv but in order for the stream to even be watchable I have to crank every quality setting to the bare minimum. There is no way in hell I could stream something like the new killzone without making it look like it belongs on the PS2.

Backwards compatibility isn't a requirement for me, but when you have some really high tier PS3 games coming out this year and I'll still have to boot up my old console to play them, well that's certainly not a good thing. Sacrificing backwards compatibility by going with less-restricted hardware is an unfortunate (but necessary) evil.

All the talk about embracing developers was great, but how do they exactly plan on doing this? Outside of Accessible Architecture they really didn't go into details at all. This was the million dollar question for me, and i'm kind of irritated they didn't address it, especially with bringing Jonathon Blow up there.

The last hour was difficult to watch, the fact that 3rd party multiplatform developers were on the boat for ps4 development shouldn't even BE an announcement. I was scratching my head when Shinji Hashimoto runs up on stage, and without even a screenshot or render announces a brand new final fantasy title to be shown at E3. What exactly was the point of that? Showing us a tech demo from last years E3? What the hell Square Enix?!? Then you have Watch Dogs in which the gameplay that was shown was PC and not PS4, and I felt so sorry for Metzen when he announced Diablo 3 and got a golf clap response. (Diablo 3 would honestly be really well suited for the WiiU, with the tablet controller.) The Bungie guys didn't really look excited at all to be there, and not a single sports title announced OR rpg? Knack looked like a very linear (ironic, considering the original was a 2d platformer) vectorman clone. The new Infamous title looks pretty slick, at least from the trailer that had zero gameplay in it. I also can't help but feel I was the only one that was offput by the tear gas sob story, was almost expecting Ubisoft to take it one step further and tell us a horrible tale about their aol accounts being stolen in 1999 prior to the watch dog trailer.

I hate when being "social" is forced on my gaming experience. If I want to social network I'll get on facebook and twitter, I don't look for that experience in gaming. When it DOES happen in gaming, it's best done when it's not forced on you.

I hope I'm wrong and I hope the PS4 is very successful (Sony NEEDS this to be successful) but I truly feel that today's presentation was all style and very little substance. I can honestly say I'm more excited to get my hands on Naughty Dog's "The Last of Us" than I am a PS4, and that depresses me. Microsoft will need to really drop the ball to do worse.

PS. The only way that David Cage following Jonathon Blow could have been more ironic is if Peter Molyneux came on after Cage for the ultimate trifecta.

Jonathan Jennings
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wow knack ...did look a lot like vector man lol

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Duvelle Jones
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@Dan Eisenhower "Most of your complaints come from a rickety kind of "get off my lawn" perspective. Your only argument against Sony's progressive attitude on streaming and so forth seems be how it affects you individually. "

To be honest, what Jimmy describes over the streaming is not very unique...
I myself admit that it's a cool feature, BUT... I only get a maximum of 6mbit up (unlimited), and others would have to deal with a bandwidth cap on top of speed issues. There is a minimum speed/bandwidth requirement that comes with all of this, and Sony avoided answering that question (mostly because it was never going to be answered right now, and that it was never asked).

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Duvelle Jones
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That we'll have to see.

Jimmy Albright
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@Dan Eisenhower
I'll try and address some of your points here..

1. First party games


Knack - Can you really look at knack and be excited about what you see? Did it appear to be taking advantage of the powerful PS4 hardware? Did any of it look to be taking advantage of the new peripherals? Unless you watched some gameplay videos that I didn't, the answers are No, no, and no.

Infamous - Was gameplay even shown for this? My stream cut out a few times around this but I remember seeing zero actual gameplay. I was also REALLY put off by the whole sob story about getting hit with tear gas in 1999, unless this entire game was the brainchild of one mans run-in with the law over a decade ago, I fail to see any sort of relevance. There was also quite a bit of irony about discussing the horrors of security at the cost of liberties, especially when you're in the presence of a company who sues people for opening their hardware up. (Also demanding the IP addresses of anyone who visited geohot.com)

Killzone - As far as Killzone goes, it looks good. I'm still holding out judgement on this till we see a bit more, especially after the 2005 E3 presentation of Killzone 2. For those that don't remember, there was a LOT of speculation that the trailer was only partially gameplay. Outside of a few minor issues that I would consider nitpicking, the new Killzone title looks pretty slick.

Drive Club - Looked pretty solid for the most part, but too much of the presentation was the developers talking about how excited they were about the PS4 without much talk about the technology behind it or even the game itself. For me this presentation got a little overly ambitious when it showed people playing on teams together in the same game from around the world. Right, I'm sure I'll be able to race with and against people in europe, australia, and all over the world with only a minor delay.

The lack of Naughty Dog presence despite them having a 2nd team working on Uncharted 4 had me a little worried.


"You're not some journalistic "truth teller" just because you bad mouth a corporation. That's basically the Avril Lavigne version of social justice."

I agree with you 100%. I don't consider myself the gaming prophet who will allow everyone to see the light. What I wrote was my honest opinion, and I did my best to back up my viewpoints with reason. My writing skills are immensely underdeveloped to consider myself to have any sort of journalistic integrity. I even put a little disclaimer at the top of my comment warning everyone it was a rant.

"For instance on your question about "helping developers" social features and streaming do just that. By being able to spectate other players' games simply by opening an App on your phone, the exposure of smaller titles and cultural impact of gaming in general will increase exponentially. "

Right, but my concerns about developers was rooted in accessibility and in the submission process. That's what anyone who was interested in releasing a title to the PS4 should have been interested in. Unless I missed something vital, all we really know is that it should be a bit easier to develop for, based on the hardware architecture. How many times did they talk about embracing developers or have something similar plastered on the screen? For me, that's the equivalent of listening to robots repeat "synergy" in a conference room. Don't TELL me you're going to embrace developers, SHOW me. I'm on the fence about where I want to go as far as development, and I feel Sony did a poor job of convincing me to give the PS4 a shot. Sony's way of telling me that they're embracing Indies is bringing a rambling Jonathon Blow on stage to tell us about The Witness.

The social gaming might not be "mandatory" but when a company like Sony talks about making the gaming experience "social" it's hardly a good thing. Can you not make parties and play games together on the PS3? I honestly feel very few of the "features" are actually going to enhance the social gaming experience. Have you ever been in a position where you wanted a friend to remote into your game and show you how to do something? If I'm ever TRULY stuck on something, it takes literally 30 seconds go whip out my phone and google the puzzle or boss or whatever I'm stuck on. I'm extremely curious to see if this feature will actually be used.


As far as the rest of the presentation the multiplatform showings were awful. It's like Square Literally nothing there to be excited for, even Watch Dogs which was one of the best new things from E3 2012 was shown using PC gameplay.

You're 100% right that the PS4 shouldn't take flak for the big disappointments with the 2nd half of their presentation, and things out of their control like internet speeds in various areas, but this was THEIR SHOW. This was their huge announcement they spent the past month hyping up, and they set it completely on their timetable, and it sucked. The PS4 might be a great console, but I really, truly feel Sony did a horrible job of convincing consumers it's going to be. To put it in really simple terms, Sony was throwing a party and had a month to plan it, and the party was horrible. By extension it doesn't make Sony, or the PS4 itself horrible, but their presentation that they ran yesterday was quite underwhelming for me.

"So you see your antipathy towards using social and internet actually circles in on itself, and is at odds with your purported goals. When you build an argument on cynicism, inevitably it mutates to a pointless screed built on circular logic. "

I own a PS3, a Wii (and a WiiU), and a 360. I don't have any sort of agenda to rip on Sony, and if Microsoft's "durango" release announcement is just as bad (or worse) expect me to have a similar opinion. More than likely I'm still going to get a PS4, but for me there aren't any compelling reasons to wait in line for one.

A S
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I get the feeling this was kinda rushed to pre-empt whatever MS is going to announce later this year, which may account for the slightly off game announcements. Then again, the business is run by Kaz Hirai (he of "Ridge Raaacceeeeer" fame) so maybe they just don't care that much about the announcements?

Thom Q
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So, they juiced up the hardware, planning on having more social connectivity, and want to push more for streaming & downloaded games.

Call me out if I'm wrong, but are these not the bare minimum of things to do with the new systems? Isn't that what everyone expects the next-gen consoles to have? I didn't find anything that exciting about yesterday's stream.

Ow, and there's gonna be another Killzone & another Final Fantasy..... *Yawn*

GameViewPoint Developer
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Exactly, it's the inevitable coming together of the tech we are already using, but it's evolutionary not revolutionary and that's the problem.

Thom Q
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Yup.. And not that every iteration of a console should be a totally revolutionary product, sometimes it's fine to just upgrade some hardware.

But I think that with the console market being what it is, just muddling through with essentially the exact same products as the last 8 years is pretty much the safe route. All they're doing is trying to squeeze as much money out of the market before it collapses, rather then taking a risk and try to get the market out of its slump..

I really think this coming generation is the end of at least One of the consoles.

GameViewPoint Developer
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Yeah it's all over for consoles, mobile put pay to them. Now it's all about who owns the biggest and most profitable App store. There's still some wiggle room in that arena though, still time left for someone to swoop in and dominate. It could be Apple if they upgrade their Apple TV, could be MS if they get it right with remote play across all Windows devices and the new Xbox, could be Steam if they ever release a Steambox, and finally it could be Google if any of their "unconsoles" get going.

Thom Q
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Personally, I don't think mobile gaming has that big of an impact on the console market as people tend to think. Granted, i have not read any studies on the issue, but mobile gaming is something what kids & people tend to do outside of the living room. Recession, always running behind the curve when it comes to tech (social implementation for instance) and just the sheer number of overpriced uninspired clones are the main reason, I think.

Dave Long
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@ GameViewPoint Developer - you're living in a narrow silo if you think it's all over for consoles - there is still a large (multi-million, tens if not a hundred+) audience for that kind of gaming experience that don't enjoy the limitations of mobile. Mobile is huge, of course, but don't fall into the 'Facebook fallacy' that growth of one thing means the death of another. Matrix and Battlefront are still making hex-style strategy games, when in the 1990s everyone said that Dune-2 style RTS would kill traditional strategy. It didn't, traditional strategy is still alive and well because Dune 2 RTS games don't do what traditional strategy does, and mobile most definitely doesn't do what traditional consoles do.

Jorge Molinari
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I was fooled (seduced really) for about 5 minutes. Then I saw the Resistance demo. That’s when it became evident that my prediction of next gen being simply “lipstick on a pig” would be fulfilled. More shine, more polygons, more particles, better lightling, yadda, yadda, yadda.

Same physics, AI, and gameplay from 10 years ago. I’ll continue to enjoy the XBLA versions of Spelunky and Terraria when it comes out in a few weeks. They may not have new AI or physics, but at least they offer new gameplay that is not tied to a motion control gimmick device.

BTW- I’m not buying the Media Molecule tech demo either. I mean if it really were simple to create and animate 3D models (and have them be exportable) I would buy a PS4 just for that reason. But the tech was showcased in such moron-friendly way that it’s pretty obvious that the “application” can’t be that powerful. Ahh but what a glorious dream that would be: 3D modeling and animation for the rest of us!

Mathieu MarquisBolduc
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"We were all pleased to hear that the PlayStation 4's CPU will be X86-based"

I was not. I find the 360 and PS3 PowerPC risc-style assemply to be much easier to work with than x86.

Jamie Mann
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1. Accessible Architecture
This is an interesting one on several levels.
First, switching to an x86 processor (and an AMD one, to boot) does potentially make things easier for developers, but it also reduces the level of differentiation between the PS4 and the PC.

I'd guess that this choice has been made mostly on cost grounds, but it could also hint that Sony's backing away somewhat from the hardware market - it's certainly a far cry from the hugely ambitious plans they had for the Cell processor.

It also completely kills stone dead any possibility of backwards compatibility, which could well have an impact on early sales - witness the backlash when Microsoft initially failed to include BC capabilities on the Xbox 360.

2. Powerful Tech
Mmm. Debatable. An AMD CPU and an AMD GPU with 8gb of ram is a step up from the PS3, but you can buy a comparably specc'd PC (with dedicated GPU) right now for around 400 GBP. Admittedly, the PS4 has the advantage of standardised hardware, but give it a year or two, and with Moore's law in operation, it's likely that even mid-range laptops will be capable of meeting/exceeding the PS4's performance levels.

3. Smarter Discoverability
Hmm. Without wanting to be cynical, I'll believe that one when I see it. Perhaps more importantly, "discoverability" is more of a concern for high-volume markets (i.e. downloadable games): it's arguably less relevant for AAA titles.

4. No More Demo Development?
I'm not sure I see this one at all. The XBLIG service on the Xbox 360 has shown up the limitations of timed demos, especially for games where the initial gameplay is very limited (e.g. lots of cutscenes/training exercises). As such, it's not uncommon for developers to release demos which showcase later parts of the game. Then too, demos are often released prior to a game going gold and may be based on beta code.

As for Gaikai: we'll have to wait and see. It has all the issues which OnLive had (e.g. high latency, high bandwidth usage, visual compression artefacts, major server investment requirements, etc) and while convenience tends to trump quality in the long run, I think we're a long way off this being a viable game-delivery mechanism for a high volume platform such as the PS4

5. Keeping Old Games Alive
This is a possibility - after all, Gaikai effectively gives you unlimited processing power for emulation. But there's all the issues from point 4 to take into account, plus the fact that game availability will depend on the whims of Sony's management.

Finally: I'm mildly surprised that this article didn't touch upon the changes for the DualShock4: a touchpad, full motion-sensing capabilities and a "lightbar" which can be read by a camera in a similar fashion to Sony's Move technology. Oh, and it only has a single Options button rather than having Start and Select (which is another potential concern for any potential PS2/PS3 backwards compatibility, though the touchpad could be used as a substitute).

Personally, the lightbar and touchpad feel like gimmicks, and I suspect - much as with sixaxis and Move - there's going to be a lot of casual games which use them, but few (if any) AAA titles are going to incorporate them as primary control mechanisms....

Cordero W
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The move to a better compiler-friendly architecture is more proof that the games will be stream only and/ or digital. It makes sense. How to use a PC comfortable environment without making it applicable to pirate it? Simple. Make everything be authorized on the server end. This bothers me because though it seems like it's a good thing on the surface, there's too much room for abuse. Not to mention, no internet could mean losing a lot of playability on some games depending on how they are built. Still, their system is going to be priced a pretty penny from what it showed, and for that I will not be buying this console. I further won't buy it because as a gaming console, it doesn't bring anything new to the table that Wii U hadn't already did, and at a lesser cost.

A W
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I got to say that Sony are a bunch of stubborn hats to keep that Duel Shock around. They just added to it. It so un-revolutionary, that they didn't even spend time talking about it. I would have loved to have known why it needed a small touch pad on it. Everything else about it us screamed at us, no new ideas. It would have been better had they announced that the PS vita was the new controller and that this controller was the equivalent of the Nintendo Pro controller.

Adam Bishop
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I'm surprised to see how negative the reaction here is. I went in expecting to be underwhelmed and came out feeling more excited about a new console than I have in a while. On the games side of things, Sony did a really good job of showing off a wide variety of products. After last year's E3 I was feeling pretty burned out on console games and tired of the constant focus on excessive and brutal violence, so I was glad to see a console maker put together a presentation that showed a wider spectrum of what gaming is capable of.

On the tech side, a fair deal of what they were talking about sounded like in-development stuff rather than finished tech, but what they talked about has tons of promise. The idea of the console recording video of your gaming in the background is great. I love the idea that if I do or see something cool in a game, all I have to do is pause it and go to the OS and I can immediately grab my video to upload it to Youtube, share with my friends on my social networks, etc. Some games like EA's hockey game allow this kind of thing to some degree already, but it's really clunky and slow. Letting people stream live video is a smart idea too. I don't know how much I'll use it (if at all) but streaming videos of things like League of Legends matches get huge viewership on PC so Sony is smart to tap into that.

One perhaps unintended upside about the video capture stuff that I'm really looking forward to is that it should be much easier now to collect and submit proof of the racist/sexist/homophobic jerks who ruin so much online multiplayer. It'll be much easier now to just say "Here's the video of xxBRO47xx calling people fags" and get them banned from the service. Maybe I'm being overly optimistic on this point, but I hope this will lead people in online games to feel more like they're in public and act with the decency that you'd expect from that kind of social interaction.

The stuff they're talking about doing with Gaikai is fascinating. I love the idea of being able to just start playing a demo immediately rather than waiting for it to download. Saves time, and also likely saves a ton of bandwidth. As long as regular downloads are available for anyone who still wants them, I don't see what the downside is to this streaming technology.

I also really like the idea of using your PS4 as a server. With the Vita connectivity, they've basically said "Hey Nintendo, we can do what your console can do but our version is cooler." Plus they talked about using the streaming technology to allow a person on another PS4 to jump into your game remotely. How cool is that? Who needs guided developer demos when your friend can just say "Let me boot up the game and let you jump into this awesome part"?

I'm sure there's stuff I'm forgetting here, and it's true that some of this stuff still needs work to hit the point where the functionality matches the promise, but I was really glad to see Sony come out with a collection of ideas about using modern technology in interesting ways rather than just saying "Our box is really powerful, here's some manshooters."

Mathieu MarquisBolduc
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If the console was handing out free candy everytime you get a trophy, people would complain its not the right candy. No surprises there.

Kevin Alexander
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I'm dubious of the streaming download thing if developers are expected to integrate new challenging tech to make their game dynamically playable in ANY form.... Architecturally this would need to be a big decision.

However, if Sony has some way to do this leveraging their new magic skills (which i'm optimistic about) without burdening sensitive development time then I would agree its win/win.

Demo's as they stand now, cost way too much particularly in challenging parts of the pipeline (when the team is trying to go gold usually). If theirs ways Sony can help to give even more value back to that investment then it would be great.

Jarod Smiley
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Completely agree..People are just extremely cynical and want some ground breaking announcement like Sony joins up with Apple to be half-way satisfied.

Everything Sony showed was solid. I'm not gaming on my smartphone or tablet anytime soon and I will NEVER game on Steam because I don't like playing titles on PC, or having a PC hooked up to my TV. What MS does and Apple in the TV space is up for grabs, but I was very impressed and satisfied that Sony is offering a basic upgraded PS3 with better easier hardware, and simpler design, and controller that looks more comfortable and what looks to be a much improved Ecosystem. If the platform is an open as claimed, they done did good, and we should see new titles all the time from anymore between free, $2, all the way to $60 on PSN. That's a win in my book.

Jimmy Albright
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What specifically on the games side of things has you excited? Killzone looks pretty fancy, but we saw no gameplay for infamous, the racing title wasn't exactly groundbreaking or new, and knack looked like something I'd see on Steam for 5 or 10 bucks.

Mike Griffin
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It's sort of puzzling how many folks go:

"Hey it's basically a version of X consumer processor and Y consumer graphics card, with Z consumer RAM, and when I look at Newegg today that's like $500 already, lolz! This will be too expensive!"

Because custom future console tech =/= identical to off-the-shelf current tech?
Because the PS4 innards are already being manufactured and boxed up, today?
Because console makers don't strike multi-year deals with component partners to dramatically reduce parts cost over time?
Because said mainstream, consumer-level parts won't inherently plummet in price within the first two years, compared to more costly proprietary tech?

Let's not invoke this strange, inaccurate game of apples to apples price comparisons with off-the-shelf parts on the market as we speak. It's more complicated than that.

Duvelle Jones
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"Because said mainstream, consumer-level parts won't inherently plummet in price within the first two years, compared to more costly proprietary tech?"

Oh, I fully expect the value of the technology to degrade rapidly... it not like AMD doesn't rapidly iterate the x86 platform. They do, it's the corner stone of their business in the PC world. But will the consumers see that drop in value from Sony?

That is rather up in the air, and history (namely the "Super Slim" PS3/slim PS2/PSOne) would say other wise.

"Because custom future console tech =/= identical to off-the-shelf current tech?"
Not really, it depends on were you customize and for what... details that I don't expect to see in public for a while.

"Because the PS4 innards are already being manufactured and boxed up, today?"
I would be shocked if they where not producing the system as we speak to build a warehouse stock for the holiday, but that is not to say that things will not change... they do, but I would expect to see more resistance to that now since (assuming that they have started production) any change now would be costly.


And as a note, precipitation of value is as dangerous as expectation of value in the eyes of the consumer. If Sony over-prices the device.... it's going to be a hard road to convince others that the PS4 is worth the price if that precipitation is set or wrong (The Vita and 3DS are rather good lessons of this). In the post-recession market with consumers sensitive to high pricing, that is something that I hope Sony considers...

Bob Johnson
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Wll Pc architecture mean better pc ports?

Henrik Strandberg
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The promise of GaiKai/cloud tech is IMHO the greatest innovation and possible future disruption here.

However, this is a must-listen to anyone in the US online industry:
http://thedianerehmshow.org/audio-player?nid=17138


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