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See this new fluid simulation algorithm in action
April 23, 2013 | By Mike Rose

April 23, 2013 | By Mike Rose
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    7 comments
More: Console/PC, Programming, Design, Video



A new fluid simulation algorithm that utilizes the same PhysX SDK framework that is used to simulate cloth and deformables is expected to be included in future versions of the toolset.

The above video shows the new algorithm, known as Position Based Fluids, in motion. The algorithm uses the Position Based Dynamics PhysX SDK framework, and is also expected to be made available as part of Nvidia's APEX scalable dynamics framework.

The team at PhysXInfo.com notes that the simulation uses an iterative solver, meaning it can maintain incompressibility more efficiently than traditional smoothed-particle hydrodynamics fluid solvers.

More details can be found on the PhysXInfo blog.


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Comments


Chris Hendricks
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Wow. That's beautiful. Of course, seeing it in a game filled with other computations will be another thing, but still... very cool.

Michael G
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I'm still not convinced that these particle based fluid are really efficient. We observe physical effects of water most acutely on the surface and the terrain of the ocean floor or whatever it is below will have an impact on that, especially at shallower depths, but there seems to be a significant portion of the body of water that isn't having a significant impact on the visible result.

Joel Bennett
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Perhaps that's an area of research to help optimize things like this...

Danilo Buendia
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Perfect for games, if your game is about characters frozen in fear as a tidal wave comes for them

Chris Hendricks
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Fair enough. Their demo obviously works with moving objects (moving walls, holes in glass), I'm surprised they didn't show a character walking through it.

Scott Jordan
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All this physics tech is really cool. I predict it will be used mostly to make boobs jiggle realistically.

Michael G
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We've got that already, that was a core feature back in the Ageia days. You should've seen the boobs on those Ghost Recon soldiers.


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