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Video: Curating the do-it-yourself revolution
May 17, 2013 | By GDC Vault Staff

May 17, 2013 | By GDC Vault Staff
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More: Console/PC, Social/Online, Indie, Art, Design, Video



Developers Terry Cavanagh (Super Hexagon) and Porpentine (Howling Dogs) call for other developers to highlight interesting games, as they have been on their Free Indie Games blog, in this talk from GDC 2013.

Courtesy of the GDC Vault, this 30-minute session focuses primarily on the innovation in a large list of games, including Merritt Kopas' Lim, which deals with the gender topic of passing, and Droqen's platformer Asphyx, which asks the player not to breathe in real life whenever their avatar is underwater.

Session Name: Free Indie Games: Curating the DIY Revolution

Speaker(s): Terry Cavanagh, Porpentine

Company Name(s): Independent

Track / Format: Independent Games Summit

Overview: By hunting down and curating games that defy convention on both cultural and technical axes, Free Indie Games is one of today's most important game-related sites. In this presentation, Porpentine will describe how outsider voices are challenging and redefining the nature of games, talk about Free Indie Games as a response to the huge growth in indie DIY, and present some of the best, most overlooked indie games of 2012.

About the GDC Vault

In addition to this presentation, the GDC Vault offers numerous other free videos, audio recordings, and slides from many of the recent GDC events, and the service offers even more members-only content for GDC Vault subscribers. Those who purchased All Access passes to events like GDC, GDC Europe, and GDC China already have full access to GDC Vault, and interested parties can apply for the individual subscriptions via a GDC Vault inquiry form.

Group subscriptions are also available: game-related schools and development studios who sign up for GDC Vault Studio Subscriptions can receive access for their entire office or company. More information on this option is available via an online demonstration, and interested parties can find out more here. In addition, current subscribers with access issues can contact GDC Vault admins.

Be sure to keep an eye on GDC Vault for even more new content, as GDC organizers will also archive videos, audio, and slides from other events like GDC China and GDC 2013. To stay abreast of all the latest updates to GDC Vault, be sure to check out the news feed on the official GDC website, or subscribe to updates via Twitter, Facebook, or RSS.

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Comments


Michael Joseph
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Watch this presentation if you want to get an idea of just how boxed in and rigid your thinking about game design has become. It's unnerving to realize how trapped our thinking can become after having been raised on a steady diet of mainstream game products.

The questions at the end were unfortunately quite sad. It seemed to me as though the questioners despite having sat there and watched this presentation were still locked in the mindset that the ultimate goal of games is to make money and so were still wondering how do you make these games more like "real" games so you can reach a wider audience (and presumably make a lot of money).

Anyway, thanks for posting this insightful presentation and thanks to Terry Cavanagh and Porpentine for making it.

Marc Wilhelm
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Agreed. Games get so much more interesting when the core impetus for making them is not simply attracting a mass audience (and/or money.)


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