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'It takes women working on games for games to change.'
'It takes women working on games for games to change.'
July 16, 2013 | By Kris Ligman

July 16, 2013 | By Kris Ligman
Comments
    68 comments
More: Console/PC, Production, Business/Marketing, Recruitment



"It takes women working on games for games to change."
- Media Molecule studio director Siobhan Reddy, in an interview with BBC Radio 4.

Siobhan Reddy believes women are underestimated as a productive force in the games industry. "There are all sorts of discussions about where it is now and where it has been," she tells BBC Radio 4. "[The scarcity of women in the field] is one that I'd really like to see us solve."

"There are some sad statistics which are that by the time girls are in Year 8 they've been put off working in tech or in games, whether in the home or by a teacher or by friends," she continues. "We really need to be looking at how we can encourage women to see games as an exciting industry... We have very few creative directors who are women. We have a lot of women within the industry who run studios and pack a mean punch, you know -- the influence of women within the industry is pretty great -- but we need to see that on the game design and programming side as well."

Reddy acknowledges that one issue which needs to be addressed in order to start closing the industry's gender gap is the present lack of female role models for tech. "That actually did give me a bit of a kick, to [help] make sure we were visible to young women out there contemplating a career in video games," she offers.

"We get here via various different ways, and the way that things change is from within. I feel like the change for the industry is in representing our female audience. I will never make a game that does not take that into consideration."


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Comments


Dustin Hendricks
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I think a lot of game devs started to learn programming because of games that they played when they were younger. So maybe to get more girls making games, there needs to be more girls that play games. To get more girls to play games, there needs to be more games geared towards girls. To get more games geared towards girls, there needs to be more women in the games industry... Dammit, back to square one.

Katy Smith
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Just making games that don't *exclude* women or girls from playing is a great start.

Jason Fleischman
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I don't recall any games that don't let females play them.

Katy Smith
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No, but I can think of a lot of games that say "you are not welcome here".

Dustin Hendricks
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It's not that they don't "let" women play them, it's that their themes are usually based around some badass dude saving some helpless attractive female. Not exactly inclusionary for women players. Imagine if in the majority of AAA games your only choice was to play as a badass girl who saves some helpless prettyboy? Would you play as much?

Epona Schweer
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Just for the record:

Main characters are usually so flat that it doesnt really matter if they're male or female - they aren't relatable either way.

It doesnt have to be a gender issue for us to raise the quality of our character creation and writing across the industry.

We should be doing it anyway...as artists.

And "artist", in society, is a relatively gender agnostic role

Kyle Redd
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@Dustin

If the badass girl and helpless prettyboy were written in an in interesting way with complex, believable emotions and motivations, I would absolutely love to play that game, as I imagine nearly all guys would. Similarly, I loved watching movies like Monster and Brave, which are both told entirely from the perspective of a woman. I had no trouble at all empathizing with them and getting involved in their stories.

If the quality of game writing ever came close to the quality found in movies like those, protaganists' genders wouldn't be an issue.

Kenneth Blaney
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In a world where women are increasingly playing games, it is hard to argue that games are also increasingly excluding women. That is, you submit that there is a vicious cycle preventing improvement. Instead I posit we are at the beginning of a trend with a long lag time. That is, more young girls are playing games now (even though many of those games seem to exclude women) and so we will get more women in games which will lead to more young girls playing games, etc until games become as mainstream as any other tech job and in the future more or less all jobs are tech jobs.

Dustin Hendricks
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ever watched this? http://www.feministfrequency.com/

Luis Guimaraes
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@Epona

Perfectly said.

Dustin Hendricks
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Kyle, yes, but what if you were still 8 years old though? Would you answer this question in the same way? What if on top of that there was lots of pinks and purples used in the game? Ponies? Little boys are in to guns and swords. What are little girls in to? What percentage of games look like that? Are these all just gender stereotypes? Ah but do they affect sales? Does your 8 year old boy want a game about my little ponies? What if all games were about my little ponies, what would your your 8 year old boy do then? Would there be some percentage less chance that he would eventually become a programmer?

Michael Ball
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OR we can stop making the issue about gender, stop trying to make the same few game types appeal to as large of an audience as possible in misguided attempts to be the next CAWADOODY, and get back to making many different games types that cater to specific audiences.

Despite all the accusations of sexism, rape culture and such other terms, the root of the problem has nothing to do with gender. The real problem comes from the lack of greater diversity in non-casual mainstream gaming, not only in community and development, but also in gameplay.

In my personal opinion, the slow-but-steady resurgence of point-and-click adventure games is an ideal place to start due to the genre's relatively equal appeal to both casual and non-casual gamers.

Kyle Redd
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@Dustin

I think you're saying that the lack of games aimed at children that also contain "girl-focused" elements (ponies, pinks and purples) is turning girls off games at a young age, and thus fewer of them grow up to be programmers. And that is bad.

To which I would say - If you really think there's a lack of games about "little girl things," you aren't looking very hard at all. Amazon came up with a list of nearly 4,500 results when I searched "games for girls," with no shortage of ponies or bright colors.

Adam Rebika
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@Michael

You, sir, speak wisdom.

Samuel Green
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Trying... to withhold.. bronyism...

The iPad is probably the future for kids' games and I can see it being much more viable from a business sense to make games for girls on that platform. When we have lots of games for girls, we'll start having GOOD games for girls... then we'll hopefully have some girls who want to develop good games along the lines of what they played as a kid.

Slightly related, the My Little Pony game on iPad is VERY charming and adorable and sweet... I'd be a fan if I didn't know that little kids around the world were probably spending thousands of dollars without realizing it. MLP is a great example of something designed for girls that's WELL designed and manages to branch out from its target audience based on merit.

Wylie Garvin
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How many AAA games have playable female characters?
Who aren't either a female version of the typical macho male space-marine, or a voluptuous caricature in a skimpy chainmail bikini?

Some series let you create your own character as male or female (Mass Effect, Saints Row, Elder Scrolls...) but most games come with a pre-defined character for the player to inhabit and that character is almost always male. Or else T&A targeted at male players (Tomb Raider, Bayonetta). A lot of girl gamers want to play female heroes too, characters they can identify with.

Maybe the situation is getting better, but I'm still hard-pressed to think of many games that portray female characters as just people, instead of pandering to what male players supposedly enjoy seeing.

The Last of Us is one game I've recently played which is notable for having female characters who are sensibly dressed and have human-like body proportions. In some parts of the game you play as Ellie, and she avoids most of the ridiculous stereotypes that afflict female characters. But even this game (which I totally love by the way) has (1) more than one female character who is killed off to further a _male_ character's development/story/angst, and (2) has all-male human enemies. Yes, there are female zombie enemies but no female human enemies in the game that I can recall. I think I understand why they did that, but its still a sad commentary on the state of video games when half of the human race can't get equal treatment even among the baddies.

Peter Vesti Frendrup
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"It takes men working on games for games to change." <-- If someone said that they'd be totally flamed and called sexist. Just saying...

Kenneth Blaney
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Except it doesn't work like that. Women actually are underrepresented in the games industry and studies on the gender make up of groups show that groups with more equitable distribution of genders are more productive. So "It takes women..." is a statement on the current state of the industry, whereas "It takes men..." is a statement alleging the ineffectiveness of women at the job. In some hypothetical future where men are as underrepresented in games as women are now, those statements get flipped.

Said shorter, cultural context is a thing.

Michael Ball
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@Kenneth
But doesn't such a mindset imply that only women can make games for women, and by extension that only males can make games for males? Seems pretty segregationist to me, if not plain absurd.

Unless, of course, I'm misconstruing your words.

Luis Guimaraes
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I was gonna ask if that's an actual quote from the interview, and what does it mean by "change" (as today's AAA titles are designed by committee in Marketing departments). Listening the interview to clear that up.

"It takes men working on games for games to change" sounds like an Andrew Ryan quote for me.

Joseph Elliott
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Michael: I don't think that's true at all. It's not that men and women aren't capable of making games, or any art for that matter, that includes and appeals to their opposite gender; Wayne's World was directed by a woman, and that's the most duderific movie I can think of. The point is that when game development is a boy's club, more game's are going to be made for a male specific audience, simply by accident as much as anything else.

As a writer, just about every lead protagonist I make starts out as a white male, because I'm a white male and imagination takes work. I have to stop myself and think, "Wait, who am I really writing here? Am I being lazy? Is there a better way I could be doing this?" I don't have to change the race or gender of my protagonist, but examining life through a cultural lens that isn't exactly my own forces my imagination, and can lead to a more rich character and story. And if I didn't take the time to really consider why my protagonist is the way they are? I'd be writing exclusively white male dudes. It's an easy mistake to make, and it doesn't necessarily have anything to do with sexism!

Kenneth Blaney
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Michael, no I'm actually suggesting something of the opposite. That is, mixed gender teams do better work overall. Thus more women working on a game will end up with a game that is more appealing to women, but only because it is more appealing to everyone.

There is, of course, a diminishing return on this as you approach fair representation and, by no means, should this be taken as support for all female teams (which would fail to benefit from diversity in the exact opposite way).

Epona Schweer
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While women bring a very obvious change in perspective to design and production, it's a bit gender bias to say that games will change only when more women join the industry.

That statement is already false, because the industry has changed so much over just the last five years - but there havent been any wide sweeping changes to the demographics of the industry. I've heard that GDC pretty much still looks the same as it always has (maybe more people).

Yes, how to inspire more women to get into tech is a major challenge we need to solve (getting game design added to the art curriculum would be a start - creates a gateway into computer science from the safer social environment of art).

But it doesnt do us any favors to make innovation in games a gender issue.

A) statements that polarize people onto one side of the gender line or the other are really just keeping us divided
B) it still doesnt actually get us closer to solving the Really Big Challenge of getting women INTO the industry in the first place, which needs to happen before we start seeing their effect on innovation!

Kenneth Blaney
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I think in the context of the quote "change" means something very specific. That is, the type of change they want is more women in gaming and, by definition, the only way to get that change is more women in gaming.

Epona Schweer
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Author would help her case by being specific in her argument!

Kenneth Blaney
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I agree. I gave it a pass because it was a short article which has different intentions than the longer form discussions of gender politics in games.

Kris Ligman
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If you listen to the totality of the interview linked (it's only 9 minutes long), it sounds fairly clear to me, anyway, that what she's saying is that women in the industry, currently, are in a position to effect change regarding how we attract more women into the industry going forward.

That at least was what I heard and what I tried to convey with my selection of quotes. The problem with quoting rather than asking Ms. Reddy to come here with a filibuster (which she is welcome to do if she ever wants to blog with us on this or another subject) is that she's speaking extemporaneously and we do not speak in the same way as we write. However, the main thrust of her talk in the interview is definitely about *visibility* of women devs and providing role models for young women.

Robert Crouch
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I think there's 3 questions:

1: Are women (as a group) less interested in game design careers?
2: If they are, is it important that that issue is resolved?
3: Are women who want to work in game design driven away by cultural bias?

If there are fewer women who want to be in game design careers, but the women who are in game design careers are happy, that might be a success. It may just be a less interesting career choice to many girls, and this might not even be a bad thing; it's not like we have the right to force anyone to work in game design if they're not interested in it.

However, I am sure there are women who would like to work in the industry, but are turned away by discrimination from the point of education up to employment. These women may have something unique to offer, but I've seen gender discrimination in high school math classrooms. It's got to be a challenge when what you need to learn is considered wrong by your peers and role models.

More women in the game industry should be the result, not the solution. I will teach my daughter how to program, I will help her make games. Maybe she will enjoy it. What scares me is that she may love it, but that she will be discouraged by her peers, teachers and role models, while if I had a son I would instead expect he would be encouraged.

My first gaming memories include Roberta Williams's name in scrolly letters across the box of one of my favorite franchises. Once upon a time the culture wasn't such where that was unusual. There wasn't an idea of how you were supposed to behave. Or when teams were one or two people, at least it didn't matter.

Kujel s
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Kings Quest was a great game, she did a really good job on it.

Robert Lever
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How can you people keep screwing this up? Everything she said is spot on. There ARE countless female game developers all over the world. What we (the people who really know) need to do is make these talented and deserving women more visible and prominent, instead of having the likes of Kotaku and Brenda Romero talking out their butts spewing BS everywhere.

Michael Ball
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Screw Kotaku and their sensationalism. It only serves to fuel the fire and solves nothing.

Dane MacMahon
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It's not about actual gender difference, it rarely ever is. It's about societal perspective and social conformity. As long as girls are told games are for boys, nothing will change in demographics.

It might just happen naturally with time. I know I'll be showing my daughter Mario Bros., King's Quest and Deus Ex, in that order, as she grows.

Luis Guimaraes
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I wonder how much the "games are toys for kids" social impression affects the demographics of women in gaming. Teenagers go through phases of self-image and identity issues regarding "maturity", "I'm not a kid anymore" and "what the others will think".

Correct me if I'm wrong but it seems to me girls get into that phase earlier, in a more rigid way, and stay in there longer than boys do, as the commonly said phrase "girls mature earlier than boys" shows. While it in fact means physical maturity, the common meaning of the phrase said by people is that their behavior lines up with an elitist "mental maturity" label people at that age relate to adulthood.

To quote C.S. Lewis: "Critics who treat 'adult' as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."

So, maybe, is there a chance that with the fading of that stereotypical view of games as "child's toys", the rate of women interested into exacts, tech and more specifically video-games, at early age might increase too? Is that relationship possible?

Jeremy Reaban
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Why does an entire segment of gaming constantly get overlooked in articles such as this? That is, casual gaming?

The demographics of that skew towards women, and shockingly enough, the games reflect that, mostly featuring women protagonists. For instance, the other day I was just playing an IHOG based on HPL's At the Mountains of Madness.

They inserted a woman as the lead character, displacing Danforth (who instead gets injured and stays in the plane).

Jay Anne
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Exactly, and the developers who make casual games tend to skew more female as well. I think the two segments of the industry are too separate from each other to think of themselves together as "the industry". Many of the people writing these articles are developers and players of core games who have blinders on as to the rest of the actual game industry. It's always kind of sad that peoples' definition of "the game industry" is limited to just the games they personally like and play.

scott anderson
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This extends to the players also. If you ask casual game players if they are gamers, most of them would say no, and many of them would say they don't play video games. Because video games are for nerds and\or boys and they are violent and bloody.

In practice almost everyone at least occasionally plays a casual game on their phone, Facebook or the web, but the popular definition of video games often only includes AAA blockbusters.

Dane MacMahon
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I agree overall but I do think once we start calling anyone matching three while waiting for the dentist a "gamer" then the term pretty much loses all meaning.

Katy Smith
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Is it a bad thing for "gamer" to lose its meaning? It would seem silly to only call people fans of summer blockbusters "movie buffs" or people who only like romance novels "book worms".

Dane MacMahon
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Well if you think about it the term "movier" is silly because everyone watches movies. Film buff implies a level of passion and knowledge.

So perhaps ditch gamer altogether and create terms like "game buff" and "MMO buff" or what-have-you.

Andy Cahalan
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I have to say, I love this site. Most portals/online communities discussing these issues have polar division so wide it's arctic to antarctic. So many times the discussion feeds into larger women's rights issues (which is of course necessary part of the whole picture), yet we tend to often miss the best places to start truly changing things. I lambasted MP Chi Onwurah here a while back for blaming the industry outright for the lack of women, and was met with warm responses all around. Ironically, I can't even be sure that any women saw my posting. Long story short, it's great to see this issue being addressed on it's own as education and freedom of choice for children is the only way this little blue ball of ours is going to get any better. Kids are smarter than adults, i'm sure of it. I'll hasten to add that women are just as often better than men as they are equal. To the pigs that likely won't read this article; it's your loss, you're missing out on almost half of the wonders the human brain has to offer when you exclude women.

This was my previous post, for reference. Not calling Siobhan an awful politician or anything, and really glad that her views echo some of my own thoughts.

"This woman sounds like an awful politician. That final quote insinuated that the industry itself was somehow responsible. I believe Develop ran a story earlier today stating only 15% of computer science applicants are female. No matter what your opinion on sexism in the industry, a statistic like that is clearly indicative of failings in other areas such as education. Social exclusion of women in general from tech is something that starts in the home and is thoroughly compatible with the question of whether it's right to give girls baby dolls and toy kitchens. I don't disagree at all with the view that a lot can be done in the games industry to correctly increase inclusion of women, but assigning blame so blatantly is like asking the industry to fight a battle it can't win by itself."

Ted Brown
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Is it just me, or do the most visible indie game people (the "it" crowd of our niche) tend to be men? I racked my brain trying to come up with a one- or two-person studio run by women, but I'm not coming up with anything. (please reply with some examples if you would, I'd love to have a list on-hand)

I know women are hard at work on the front lines in all of the disciplines, I'm just waiting for women to "seize the crown" as it were and take the stand at, say, the IGF awards.

Jay Anne
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Off the top of my head, a few are Metanet, Lady Shotgun, Emily Short, Anna Anthropy, and thatgamecompany used to be. But the list is not as large as it should be.

scott anderson
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There are plenty of high profile female indie developers, but the scene is still overwhelmingly white males (even the wannabes). Some prominent female indie developers that I know:

Erin Robinson (http://livelyivy.com)
Anna Anthropy (www.auntiepixelante.com)
Christine Love (http://loveconquersallgam.es/)
Sophy Houlden (http://www.sophiehoulden.com/games/)
Robin Hunicke (http://www.funomena.com/about/)
Mare Shepard (http://www.metanetsoftware.com/about.html)

Ted Brown
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Thank you, Scott and Jay.

Roger Tober
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If it means being able to play more games that aren't based on combat and stealth, I'm all for it.

Charles Forbin
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*shrug* The biggest female gamer I know is my sister. She's 54, married, professional scientist. Her favorite games in the past year have been Skyrim, Far Cry 3, Borderlands 2 and Bioshock Infinite. In games with character design/selection, she plays as big buff dudes. Her Mass Effect 3 character looked like Dolph Lungren.

I dunno... maybe she's out on the Gaussian tail. I'm in the other direction. My Skyrim character was a sweet little wood elf girl... assassin thief. :) She's the last thing you never see.

Neither of us understand the "relatable" character thing. We play games to get as far away from real life as digitally possible for an hour or two.

Dane MacMahon
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I always play a female on RPGs, usually an assassin or rogue as you describe. It's not just a way to make up for most games having male protagonists; I also enjoy the general idea of a "look at her as a cute piece of meat until she uses that against you and puts a dagger in your ribs" play on appearances.

[User Banned]
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This user violated Gamasutra’s Comment Guidelines and has been banned.

Jed Hubic
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I don't really want to see games "change", but I would definitely like to see more and more variety from people with many different viewpoints and experiences.

As long as there are no concrete discriminatory hurdles and talent is allowed to shine through, it's just a matter of accepting how many male vs female basement dwellers are out there plugging away at game development. Or not...

Hakim Boukellif
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Back when I studied computer science (2003-2007) there was only one woman in the same year as me for the last two years or so (there were a couple more before that, but they moved to other departments like business informatics). Keep in mind here that:
1) This was CS, not a game development-specific course. Most students didn't go there to enter the game industry.
2) This was in the Netherlands, not some country where it's expected that women have less opportunities than men.

While there's much more to game development than just programming, of course, it does show that the problem is more widespread than just the game industry. Perhaps there's needs to be more focus on what is discouraging women from going into that direction in general.

Robert Barker
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I majored in CS during the exact same time frame (in the U.S.) and I saw the same thing. Now that I'm a (non-game) developer in the industry, I still see very few women writing code.

I'm not sure this is necessarily a bad thing. It's not like women are being discouraged or kept from programming. They can write code as well as I can, it's just that most of them simply don't want to. For some reason, by and large, programming does not appeal to the female psyche.

Diversity is great and even desirable, but sometimes it's just not in the cards.

Elisabeth Beinke-Schwartz
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@Robert Barker
"For some reason, by and large, programming does not appeal to the female psyche."

This is a dangerous road of thought my friend...
I have always disagreed with the train of thought "oh, women's personalities/minds just aren't interested in STEM. That's just how it is." There are more cultural factors at play here that make these fields not appealing to many women and it's not an innate difference between how the 'female psyche' works as compared to men.

Robert Barker
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Could you expand a little bit on these cultural factors? I know gaming is often viewed as a "guy thing", so I can see how gender culture might play a hand in reducing the number of women programming games.

However, my line of programming (business applications), is gender neutral. Creating an application that handles the company's cargo billing isn't really a guy thing or a girl thing. Yet I still see the same lack of female programmers that's being reported in game studios.

Lisa de Araujo
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This starts so early. I've been involved in games for more than 15 years and I see only marginally more designers, artists and especially, programmers than I did in the beginning. When I say marginally, I mean in the ones or twos. Here in the UK, technology education is woeful and neither girls nor boys get much of an opportunity to learn skills that help them along a path to programming. Games is a great catalyst for boys, but girls might need a different sort of encouragement to pursue a programming career.

And art education has a similar problem. My own daughter is studying animation at university, but the quality of the technical side is less than stellar. She's had to teach herself to use Max and Maya and now helps tutor her fellow students. Even then, the focus is on narrative in animation, and while that's no bad thing, there's certainly a need to teach students the technical side of 3D art and animation.

Daniel Backteman
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Anything gets stagnant if it's isolated from conflict and challenges. More women in game development? Sure, that's one way to challenge the status quo.

Maria Jayne
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I think we underestimate the number of women who play games these days, I think we believe the social stereotype a little more than it exists. Through that belief, we may in fact encourage the myth that women don't play games enough.

Been playing games since I was 7, I'm now 35, still playing them. The amount of female gamers has risen considerably in the last two decades. New generations are ignoring the myth that older generations continue to propagate.

I think it's less about encouraging women to play games and more about encouraging them to admit it. We're still not mainstream, we're still seen as geeky, nerdy and socially awkward people. We can't even convince everybody that the gaming audience aren't still children and teenagers.

While I may not explain this very well, the fact as a society we consider games for children, that may well have an impact on teenage girls as they mature and try to "grow up". By picking professions that show evidence of that maturity, via disassociation with video games.

Wylie Garvin
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I want to see more diverse (and representative) characters in games. I think it will lead to better games--games that have more appeal outside the "core male audience" but are also just generally more interesting for everybody. Like what TV shows went through during, say, the last 25 years or so: a few decades ago all the main characters were either white males or savage stereotypes, I think modern TV shows have gotten much better at this but relatively speaking, AAA games are still like pre-80's television in the character stereotypes and the way they usually portray female characters.

One thing that I think will help us get there, is to get more women onto game design teams. There they will have the influence to add more interesting female characters to games, and also to call out / push back on misogynist ideas or content before they become part of the final product.

Amanda Lee Matthews
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I don't want to see video games change to become misandrist (or as women like to call it, "feminist"); So if that is the goal of women getting into the creative side, I am going to discourage it.

Elisabeth Beinke-Schwartz
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Whoa... Feminists are not "man-haters." You can be a feminist (pushing for equal rights for women as compared to men) and fight for men's rights.

In fact, this is what many feminists do as many of the things feminists fight for also benefit men (example: traditional gender roles hurt/can frustrate men just as much as women). In fact, I'd recommend reading this article: http://everydayfeminism.com/2012/08/why-men-need-feminism-3/

Pamela Charlebois
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I think the biggest reason is that getting into games isn't pushed as an idea in schools. I think it needs to start in High School as well as University/College programs. If it is pushed in High School, people can see their options when choosing University/College programs.

I studied Computer Science in University and was one of few females as well as the only female in my Vancouver Film School (VFS) Game Design Program I was in. I had NO idea that working in the Games Industry was an option until did research into VFS.

I'm now in my almost 7th year in the Games Industry, started as a Games Designer and now a Producer. And the number of females that I know and work with in the industry is still quite small.

Elisabeth Beinke-Schwartz
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I agree. I didn't decide on a career in game development until mid-college as I hadn't been exposed to that as a valid career option beforehand.

Bob Johnson
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No excuse for women not being role models in game design and programming. Not with the anyone can publish for next to nothing platforms that exist today like mobile and pc.

I really think it is human nature. There are just alot more guys willing to sit in their parent's basement at their computers than their are women who are. etc etc.

Don't get me wrong. All for getting good people into positions where they can make a difference. But don't like the promoting or discriminating based on gender or race etc.

Elisabeth Beinke-Schwartz
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What about human nature makes men more 'interested' in computers than women? In fact, the first computer programmers were women. What about women's physiology makes it applicable to disliking developing games?

Andrew Quesenberry
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I like that you enforce gender and nerd stereotypes in the same breath there.

Emily Thomforde
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This article and these comments were the one last push I needed to finally write this post: http://thegrene.tumblr.com/post/55697973599/i-have-decided-to-bec
ome-a-role-model
So hopefully instead of just talking about the problem, I'm now doing something about it. Thanks, everyone.

Emily Thomforde
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Better link to Gamasutra blog: http://www.gamasutra.com/blogs/EmilyThomforde/20130717/196468/I_H
ave_Decided_to_Become_a_Role_Model.php

MrPhil Ludington
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Maybe the problem here is our thinking that only women can be role models for girls? Perhaps, maybe, humans are good role models for children?

Tawna Evans
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Perhaps many guys in the industry perceive women as being "illiterate" of games, hence when a female tries to working an entry level-job, her male supervisor is likely to feel skeptical of her ability to do the job well.

I once worked as a game tester for a company, and within a week, my supervisor gave me a flier that explains all the basic controls for the Wii... It looked like something that would be handy for someone who had never touched the console, before. I felt insulted when he gave that to me, but I didn't complain.

A few days later, the company let me go. When that happened, I naturally asked why, but nobody gave any straight answers or concrete explainations.


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