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Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer will retire within 12 months
Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer will retire within 12 months
August 23, 2013 | By Mike Rose

August 23, 2013 | By Mike Rose
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    15 comments
More: Console/PC, Business/Marketing



Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer today revealed that he will retire from the company within the next 12 months, as he makes way for his successor.

Ballmer will remain as CEO while a special committee, appointed by the Microsoft Board of Directors, decides on who will lead the company next.

The Microsoft boss says that there is "never a perfect time for this type of transition, but now is the right time." Of course, Ballmer will be stepping down in the first year of the company's Xbox One console.

Although the CEO has carried Microsoft's Windows PC business far over the years, many investors have criticized Ballmer for missing the mobile and cloud computering trends in recent years.

With previous Microsoft entertainment head Don Mattrick leaving the company earlier this year, Ballmer has taken control of Microsoft's Xbox business, although the company hasn't said whether this is a permanent move.

Within minutes of the announcement that Ballmer is stepping down, Microsoft share price has surged pre-market, up roughly 9 percent.


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Comments


Kujel s
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I am very pleased to hear this, I do not like Ballmer and have been hoping he'd leave MS for quite some time.

Merc Hoffner
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For this particular company I think it would be a terrible missed opportunity if they fill the position from within. And it would be an equal shame if it was filled by a management-type even-keel boss. They need someone with big dynamic vision and strategy, not afraid to push a technology through with the full weight of their resources.

Michael Joseph
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tomorrow the following link will be available:

http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/198888/Bill_Gates_to_reclaim_M
icrosoft_CEO_position_within_12_months.php

Harry Fields
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And you're saying *no one* at Microsoft has "big dynamic vision and strategy and is unafraid to push a technology through with the full weight of their resources"?

Um wow. You just discounted a hella' crapload of sharp cookies. You can have the right ideas but if you're not the top dog and have to do it the top dogs way, then it's all for naught. I've met some peeps within MSFT who are genuinely very much at an exceptionally high level who would be able to take the role if they would look down a level or two for candidates.

Michael Joseph
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I guess a test could be, were there any folks within MS proposing any new ideas that were rejected internally but which eventually became very successful products/services for competitors? And if these folks weren't speaking up then they're not the types of leaders anyone needs.

Recruiting from within is great if the culture is right. But if the culture is... well... tainted by years of bad leadership, it's probably best to recruit from outside.

That said, if you look under the "Chief Executive Officer" heading
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Ballmer
Balmer since 2006 is credited with some positives but there's a sense that Microsoft did well despite his leadership rather than because of it.

Microsoft is so powerful even their CEO Steve Balmer couldn't bring it down.

http://www.businessweek.com/ap/2013-08-23/microsofts-stock-slumpe
d-under-ballmer


Lazslo Anton Zapotec
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Too bad the Microsoft Board of Directors has decided to outsource the CEO position to Infosys after Mr. Ballmer leaves. I am sure I am not the only one who was hoping they would slap a GUI on their stack rank process and fill the position by holding a MOBA tournament over the next 12 months.

Call it Stack Rank Warrior.

Harry Fields
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Now, that would be fun.

Doug Poston
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End of an Age.

Thank you for supporting us developers Ballmer (really).

Kevin Fishburne
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No doubt the stock bump was due to projected savings in office chairs and deodorant.

Jane Castle
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Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers, Developers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Dane MacMahon
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It has been time for him to go for a while, he was not adapting to current market changes, trends and competition well enough.

The selfish part of me hopes the rumors of shareholders wanting to drop Xbox and focus on Windows and office software is true.

Dave Hoskins
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He always reminded me of a used-car salesman, or that crazy guy on TV that sells double glazing. I'm so glad he's finally gone. But I doubt MS will start making good decision as fast as they need to, as they're stuck in the corporate clay mud of their own making.

Harry Fields
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So what is it Microsoft has done so abysmally?

http://www.engadget.com/2013/01/24/microsoft-reports-q2-2013-earn
ings/

Those are some very solid fundamentals. Sure, a misstep or two in some of the business units, but still... Microsoft does make their shareholder's decent money. Hell, their share price is pretty much as high as I've seen it in a LONG time and poised to go up from here.
You can disagree with what they do, but they're not exactly like an AMD or the like.

Dane MacMahon
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I didn't do a research paper on it, so correct me if I am wrong, but all their profit comes from Windows and office software. All their various ventures outside of that for the past decade have either failed or succeeded on much smaller terms than their competitors.

Jane Castle
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You hit the nail squarely on the head. This is also why the stock is flat for more than a decade. There is no significant growth at Microsoft.


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