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Steam, Origin and Battle.net hit by DDoS attacks
Steam, Origin and Battle.net hit by DDoS attacks
January 3, 2014 | By Mike Rose

January 3, 2014 | By Mike Rose
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    17 comments
More: Console/PC, Business/Marketing



Various large-scale game platforms were hit by distributed denial-of-service attacks last night, including Valve's Steam platform, with the affects still ongoing this morning.

DDoS attacks usually see services and networks taken down or slowed to a crawl by an overload from an outside source, meaning that users are unable to utilize these services fully while the overload is ongoing.

Electronic Arts' Origin platform first became unstable last night, with users unable to log into the EA servers. A group called "DERP" claimed responsibility on Twitter.

This same group were also allegedly behind DDoS attacks on EA.com earlier this week, as well as attacks on Blizzard's Battle.net.

Later still, both the Steam platform and Blizzard's Battle.net were taken offline, with users receiving error messages when they tried to access either website. A different pair of Twitter users claimed responsibility this time around.

The affects of the Steam downtime in particular appear to have had adverse affects for developers, who apparently were unable to access the forums or upload new game builds.

Although neither Valve nor Blizzard have acknowledged the downtime as-of-yet, EA said that it is "working to resolve connectivity/login issues affecting various platforms/games."

DDoS attacks on game servers and platforms are becoming increasingly problematic in recent years. CCP suffered large-scale attacks on EVE Online and Dust 514 earlier this year.


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Comments


David Hanson
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This sux...

Maria Jayne
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I wonder how much of this would cease if people stop acknowledging them by name.

Luis Guimaraes
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That's my take on school shootings too. Stop making worldwide news and Wikipedia pages out of killers (I don't have a Wikipedia page, do you? Yep, mass shooters have...) and they might just skip to the part they kill themselves which I believe is the main plan, they're just suicidals that want their death to become big news so they drag a lot of people along to achieve it. Because we allow it.

Wow that was off-topic :O

Err... I agree with you Maria. We're too used to just passively watch and talk about everything, and that's what makes these problems worse and more frequent, maybe we should hm... ya know... game this kind of stuff?

fred tam
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Hopefully we get an extension on sales and the expiring trading cards, because we've lost the last day of the event.

And to be frank steam has been barely functional during the entire Christmas holiday, this is just the final push over the edge.

Alex Covic
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Unfortunately, every idiot can start a DDoS attack. It is hard even for large scale services with decent Internet architecture to avoid getting hit by those, as every senior admin/CTO can tell you.

Hopefully, they were not clever enough to cover all their tracks & they'll get caught, eventually. These kind of people WANT publicity. They beg to get caught, in a sick way.

Kujel s
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I know this is an unpopular opinion among some but I'm glad somone went after Valve, they've been given too much slack for far too long and so I'm always happy when bad things happen to them.

John McMahon
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It didn't happen to Valve, it happened to me and other players. It happened to developers trying to provide service to their customers. Valve just has to clean it up.

Mike Poe
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Its hallmark of some one who has never seen personal success. Its easy to count the people here who dont actually work in games and will likely never see their own name in the credits.

Jeremy Helgevold
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Liking when bad things happen to people/companies isn't an 'unpopular' opinion. Its an asinine, uneducated, and childish position to take.

Carter Gabriel
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"Liking when bad things happen to people/companies isn't an 'unpopular' opinion. Its an asinine, uneducated, and childish position to take."

Says the steam fanboy...

Merc Hoffner
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DDoS attacks are one thing, but exposing infrastructure weaknesses is sometimes a public service. Better that attention seekers publicly and dramatically humiliate companies with irresponsibly weak infrastructure (forcing them to rapidly tighten security), than a cyber-criminal syndicate surreptitiously cracks networks and steals from user accounts for months under the radar. Better yet would be if companies listened to academic groups that identify potential weaknesses instead of belittling/suing them, but companies are often more interested in near term market confidence than mid-term system stability.

That's not to say any of that is the case here. Just saying that public chaos and exposure can sometimes serve a useful purpose.

Arthur Hulsman
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The world would be boring without things like this.

Jeremy Helgevold
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I dunno its pretty boring looking at an error screen when trying to log into a game.

Terry Matthes
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Why do multiplayer games not work when Steam is down? Are all the servers for multiplayer games on Steam hosted by Valve?

Jeffrey Crenshaw
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Would this explain why Skullgirls online matches over Steam were like power point presentations for me recently, or is that a separate connection that wouldn't be touched by this?

Zak Evans
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I was watching a popular League of Legends streamer at the time which they used for publicity in order to get their message out, which seems to be their intention. The Streamers name was 'PhantomL0rd', he had contact with members of the 'Derp' organisation. Apparently it was all a test to see whether shutting these servers down was actually possible. You should be able to find out more with a little searchup of the streamers name. definitely an interesting night for that guy.

Troy Walker
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I wonder if the idea of a reward system to thwart these flaws would be more affective to curb the behavior... aren't these companies supposedly grossing mega-millions? Doesn't Google do that and pay cash to people who find bugs or vulnerabilities... this and some name recognition in a positive way would be better imo.


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