Gamasutra: The Art & Business of Making Gamesspacer
View All     RSS
October 31, 2014
arrowPress Releases
October 31, 2014
PR Newswire
View All





If you enjoy reading this site, you might also want to check out these UBM Tech sites:


The future of Nintendo, straight from the horse's mouth
The future of Nintendo, straight from the horse's mouth
January 30, 2014 | By Mike Rose

January 30, 2014 | By Mike Rose
Comments
    43 comments
More: Console/PC, Business/Marketing



Yesterday's Nintendo shareholder briefing was a particularly sprawling (and sometimes confusing) spectacle. Following disappointing third quarter results, the company was keen to stress that it isn't going to change its course -- but, well, maybe it might do if the correct scenario presents itself.

Updated notes from president Satoru Iwata's results briefing have shed additional light on what Nintendo is hoping to achieve in the coming years, and how the company plans to rise from the slump its currently experiencing.

Here, we've collated the main takeaways from Iwata's discussion, which spread wide and far across a variety of different topics.

"We are not planning to give up our own hardware systems and shift our axis toward other platforms."

"I am here to tell you about our future, and to begin with, I would like to mention what Nintendo will not change," Iwata began with -- although as we'll see later, he was maybe stretching the defintion of "will not change."

Nintendo says that it will continue to focus on console hardware and software as its core business, and that it plans to plug more cash into research and development for future hardware.

However, Iwata acknowledged that smart devices are altered lifestyles dramatically, and thus what gamers are potentially looking for. "We must once again change our definition of video games to keep up with the times," he said. "Nintendo’s history definitely suggests that Nintendo has always flexibly innovated itself in line with the times."

He said that Nintendo is currently exploring which video game elements from the past should be kept, "and what should be dramatically changed in order to leverage our core competency."

"Our top priority task this year is to offer software titles that are made possible because of the GamePad."

Nintendo isn't giving up on the Wii U, despite poor sales figures, Instead, the company hopes to finally explain to consumers exactly why the Wii U GamePad is so innovative, and why it isn't simply a slight step-up from the original Wii.

"We have managed to offer several of such software titles for occasions when many people gather in one place to play, but we have not been able to offer a decisive software title that enriches the user's gameplay experience when playing alone with the GamePad," he admitted. "This will be one of the top priorities of Mr. [Shigeru] Miyamoto's software development department this year."

He also noted that the company is yet to properly utilize the near-field communication on the GamePad, and says that in 2014, Nintendo will finally "make full use of this function by preparing multiple proposals." We should expect to see what the company has cooking at E3 in June.

Iwata also discussed the GamePad's quick start functionality as a means for grabbing attention -- we reported on that here.

"The number of companies who have approached Nintendo with an offer to provide Nintendo 3DS with the titles which they originally designed for and grew on smart devices has been increasing."

Turning to the Nintendo 3DS, Iwata was keen to note that while the hardware isn't selling as well as expected, it's still achieving high sales compared to other available hardware.

And he noted that, while plenty of people are calling for Nintendo to make a move on mobile, the opposite has begun to happen, as some large mobile companies are finding success on the 3DS.

GungHo's Puzzle & Dragons, for example, has now sold over 1 million units in less than a month on 3DS, while Rovio's Angry Birds Trilogy has topped half a million units sold -- barely comparable to mobile sales figures for both franchises, but of course, it's worth noting that retail prices of the 3DS installments are much higher.

"As this example illustrates, the Nintendo 3DS platform has already reached a scale with enough business potential for not only the titles invented for game devices, but also the ones originally made for other platforms," Iwata says. "With the overall software lineup, we aim to make this year and the next one a profit-generating phase for Nintendo 3DS."

"I have not given any restrictions to the [smartphone] development team, even not ruling out the possibility of making games or using our game characters."

Here's where it gets most interesting. While Nintendo has claimed recently that it won't be making smartphone games anytime soon, Iwata today admitted that it may well happen -- if the conditions are right.

"Many people say that releasing Nintendo's software assets for smart devices would expand our business," he said. "However, we believe that we cannot show our strength as an integrated hardware-software business in this field, and therefore it would difficult to continue the same scale of business in the medium- to long term."

Sounds like Nintendo isn't moving to mobile any time soon -- but wait! While mobile won't ever be Nintendo's core business, Iwata adds that the company is interested in developing for mobile in some form.

"We would like to, instead of directly expanding our business on smart devices, focus on achieving greater ties with our consumers on smart devices and expanding our platform business," he says.

He's putting together "a small, select team of developers" to act as Nintendo's smartphone experimentation studio, and he won't be giving them any restrictions on what they can produce.

"We feel that simply releasing our games just as they are on smart devices would not provide the best entertainment for smart devices, so we are not going to take any approach of this nature," he noted. "Having said that, however, in the current environment surrounding smart devices, we feel that we will not be able to gain the support of many consumers unless we are able to provide something truly valuable that is unique to Nintendo."

"Accordingly, I have not given any restrictions to the development team," he continued, adding, "even not ruling out the possibility of making games or using our game characters."

But we shouldn't expect the next Mario on smartphone, he warned. "It is our intention to release some application on smart devices this year that is capable of attracting consumer attention and communicating the value of our entertainment offerings, so I would encourage you to see how our approach yields results."

"We will not rule out the idea of offering our own hardware for new markets."

At this point, Iwata discusses how Nintendo approaches "new markets", and notes that "for a large majority of consumers in the new markets... the current prices of hardware and software in the existing markets are generally difficult to accept."

He is no doubt referring to those audiences in specific regions who aren't as willing to pay premium prices for games, and who are more used to picking up games for 99 cents (or for free).

Following this, he says that "To leverage Nintendo’s strength as an integrated hardware-software business, we will not rule out the idea of offering our own hardware for new markets, but for dramatic expansion of the consumer base there, we require a product family of hardware and software with an entirely different price structure from that of the developed markets."

Iwata adds, "As you might know from today's topics of redefining the concept of a video game platform and taking advantage of smart devices, we aim to connect with consumers who do not own Nintendo’s video game systems yet, which will play an important role in cultivating new markets."

"Once we can establish such a connection with consumers in these nations, we will be able to use smart devices to share our information as well as important content distribution infrastructure. We plan to take significant steps toward such a new market approach in the year 2015."

"What Nintendo will try to achieve in the next 10 years is a platform business that improves people’s quality of life in enjoyable ways."

Iwata finishes up by discussing Nintendo's newly-announced focus on "quality of life" products.

"We decided to redefine our notion of entertainment as something that improves people's quality of life in enjoyable ways, and take a step forward in expanding our business areas," he noted.

Says Iwata, this definition includes Nintendo's regular video game platforms, but it also encapsulates a move into "a new business area" with the theme of health, rather than learning or lifestyle.

"Please note, however, that rather than simply setting health as our theme, Nintendo will also try to expand it in a new blue ocean," Iwata suggested -- and this will involve ducking around "the exceedingly crowded market of mobile applications or the market of wearable technology" and aiming for what Nintendo is calling "non-wearable technology."

Although he didn't really give a concrete examples of what "non-wearable tech" he was referring to, Iwata that said that Nintendo "are considering themes that we have not incorporated to games for our existing platforms. Including the hardware that will enable such an idea, we will aim to establish a blue ocean."

"Our new business domain would be providing preventive measures which would require us to enable people to monitor their health and offer them appropriate propositions," he added. Nintendo plans to create health software that people will want to use, rather than giving up on days into a regime.

Note that Iwata believes this tech will still be a long time coming, hence the 10 year plan.

An analyst's take

Piers Harding-Rolls of IHS Research wasn't really taken by the way that Nintendo is attempting to turn the tide for the Wii U, referring to the proposed improvements as "bitty" and "less than comprehensive."

"There was no mention of significant further investment in marketing to actually tell consumers what the Wii U is, and to make it clear it is different to the Wii," he noted.

Harding-Rolls saw Nintendo's quality of life push as the largest factor at play here, noting that "This higher risk approach does not always work out - see the Wii U for details - but IHS believes that this dependence on innovation and individuality is core to the company staying relevant beyond the short term and protecting the Nintendo brand value."

He adds that it's clear that Nintendo still has a huge amount of work to do to get itself back in shape, and that it's unlikely we'll see any immediate or significant change for the company any time soon. However, he notes that Nintendo should be considering how it prioritizes its internal budgets, as the way it organizes its various investments in the future will no doubt prove a notable challenge to overcome.


Related Jobs

Vicarious Visions / Activision
Vicarious Visions / Activision — Albany, New York, United States
[10.31.14]

VFX Artist-Vicarious Visions
Magic Leap, Inc.
Magic Leap, Inc. — Wellington, New Zealand
[10.30.14]

Level Designer
Amazon
Amazon — Seattle, Washington, United States
[10.30.14]

Sr. Software Development Engineer - Game Publishing
Magic Leap, Inc.
Magic Leap, Inc. — Wellington, New Zealand
[10.30.14]

Lead Game Designer










Comments


John Paduch
profile image
My only questions is: why is this guy still employed by Nintendo? How many executives have been shifted to lesser positions or outright fired by MS and Sony, for far less? Yet here he is, with Nintendo still struggling to keep up on basic concepts like "online play" and networking, horrible sales for the WiiU, and 3rd parties looking at Nintendo as if it has the plague. No, let's keep him in this same position, letting him make ridiculous and childish videos of him interacting with mario, and just HOPE that he can somehow turn things around.

I just don't get it.

Bob Fox
profile image
"I just don't get it. "

They've been that way since the N64 era. First cartridges instead of CD's, then the gamecube with it's special 1.5GB discs vs 4.7GB DVD's which made porting for 99% of 3rd parties a no go. Then the Wii with it's underpowered hardware once again making 3rd party multiplatform ports impossible.

Nintendo's been screwing itself since the beginning. They never got that what made SNES #1 was third parties. You can't make a console on your own. They got massively lucky with the Wii and the Wii U is proof that the Wii was a one shot deal who sold mostly to non gamers (as we all said).

True gamers knew the Wii U was going to fail because of lack of games and the poor output from Nintendo on the Wii outside of mario.

Justin Kovac
profile image
Wii U has more variety of games now than what the PS4/One offer. "True gamers" would know that and own one.


The thing is most gamers wanted next gen graphics for their BF4/CoD/Shooters/Sports titles and not many are aware the Wii U is new hardware offering Nintendo titles in HD.

Josh Charles
profile image
It's simple, really.

A) Nintendo is primarily a Japanese company with a Japanese corporate culture which is not the same as our western corporate culture.

B) Firing Iwata does nothing when the whole company shares his philosophy. Everyone from Iwata to Miyamoto to Reggie on down believe in the Nintendo way which is to offer unique experiences through innovative hardware and software.

Sure lot's of people would love for Nintendo to not be Nintendo and to be like all the other big players but it would seem that ultimately, their investors are confident that Nintendo can focus on their strengths by doubling down on their hardware/software strategy and work to address their weaknesses related to that (as was mentioned during the investor meeting).

John Paduch
profile image
@Justin - Your mistake is assuming the WiiU is "next-gen" and belongs in a group that only includes the PS4 and Xbox1. The WiiU is on-par with 360 and PS3 technology, and needs to be compared to all 4 other consoles. When you do that, your silly argument goes out the window.

Also, stop with the "true gamers" bullshit right here and now. It's a garbage statement with no meaning, other than to make people see you as an irrational fanboy who judges everyone else based on himself. Just stop it.

Nick Harris
profile image
The Wii was a success because it attracted a broader demographic with simple gesture based controls and games based on sports to which they already knew the rules from real life. It was super accessible, yet over time got players to use more of its features as they gradually mastered the interface a bit at a time. If you put an ordinary gamepad in their hands they would hold it like a dead fish, unsure what to do with it and slightly repulsed by its ugliness.

Nintendo have copied the wrong console by making the Wii U not a sequel to the Wii, but a sequel to the DS for living rooms already well served by a HD TV. The news that they intend to develop more titles that will showcase the touchscreen controller is laudable, but to my mind they need to forget it as fast as they did their Virtual Boy and bring out something that uses a pair of wireless Nunchuks and precise electromagnetic field tracking similar to the Razer Hydra or STEM.

As this is quite a complicated proposal I wrote about it at length on my blog:

http://www.gamasutra.com/blogs/NickHarris/20140129/209544/Iwata_i
snt_Nintendos_problem_Its_Shiota.php

I agree that the Nintendo way is to offer unique experiences through innovative hardware and software, but I feel that the Wii U touchscreen frightened away many prospective casual consumers with it apparent complexity, the marketing message was confused, with some thinking it was yet another Wii peripheral not a new console, and through its design it threw away everything its broader base of users had learnt about motion controls with Nunchuks making them feel dumb and alienated again.

Time to start developing the Wii 3.

Bob Fox
profile image
@ justin and Jay anne

3 generations of consoles means your arguments are moot. Gamecube was underwhelming vs PS2 and Xbox. Nintendo allowed competitors to enter the console space instead of taking that money for themselves.

The reason Nintendo slipped from #1 during the SNES era was all about their poor decisions regarding third parties and just bizzare culture of Nintendo as a company. Japanese developers have been slowly learning the power of the western market. From software the developers of dark souls and capcom were at the forefront of porting japanese games to PC. Now darksouls 2 will hit all platforms and also make a killing on PC.

Without the games outside of Nintendo, Nintendo is on a sinking ship. They simply can't hold up so many properties by themselves.

Justin Kovac
profile image
It was in reply to Bob using the words. I took it as meaning gamers who appreciate a variety of good games and gameplay options, which the Wii U offers (unless you want shooters and a good online infrastructure for multiplayer).

Its next-gen for Nintendo's platform. Its the first to offer HD Mario. Why are Cod/BF4/AssCreed the top selling on PS4/One? You could play that on your 360 or PS3. Gamers wanted a next-gen update to what they currently buy every 1-2 years. I have talked to people who did not care what system they got, just as long as they got new hardware to play Madden with better graphics. The gameplay is practically no different than the 360/PS3 version.

Wii U is the first Nintendo platform offering Mario, Zelda, etc in HD. Much like the PS3/360 were promoted heavily as hardware that offered HD (for the most part) graphics. They should be promoting that fact since consumers do care about graphics. Which is why no one is buying Wii U to play Black Flag, CoD etc while their PS3/One plays it just as good.

Bob Johnson
profile image
@John

FAr less? Execs at Sony and MS have lost way more money the past 8 years than Nintendo so not sure what you're talking about.

Iwata made Nintendo a megaton of money over the past 8 years. That's one reason he's still there.

And not sure you've figured this out but Nintendo isn't interested in being the 3rd western 3rd party AAA console nor is it interested in doing the same online play the PS and Xbox consoles do. Nintendo is also targeting families and younger kids and their mascot is Mario and the company is run by creatives as much as execs. Hence silly videos interacting with Mario.

Daniel Boy
profile image
This is heating up!

Maybe we can first start defining what "Next Gen" means this time around before we throw consoles out the window?

1080p? 60fps? 3D? Rift? Second screen?
Stable multiplayer? 256 people on one Map? MMOs? Twitch? New forms of interaction?
Touch/ voice/ camera input? Cloud computing? AI?
Good developer support? Indie-friendly? Middleware?
Nice online marketplace? Casual-friendly? F2P?

Depending on what we may decide on all three "new" consoles might not be "true" next gen but poor pretenders.

Brian Peterson
profile image
He's still employed by Nintendo because they can remember events that occurred over a year ago. Here's what happened since Iwata became president in 2002:

The Wii was a huge hit that outsold every other home console in its generation.

The DS was the best-selling handheld of all time, despite performing poorly its first year.

While not reaching DS sales records yet, sales of the 3DS have improved immensely, despite performing poorly its first year.

The Wii U has performed poorly its first year.

Eric Harris
profile image
@John
You can't be serious. Wii U Hardware is way more advanced than Xbox360 or PS3. It is not as advanced as XBone or PS4, but saying it is "on par" with the last gen is an outright lie. You might not like it, but the stuff that is being put out by XBone and PS4 can easily run on the Wii U.

Sean Wilton
profile image
Well of course they do, the system's been out for over a year. Give the XB1 and PS4 time and they will catch up and surpass the Wii U.

The Wii U's problem is not just its name, its the fact that its 8 year old hardware being passed off as new.

Sean Wilton
profile image
Actually most developers say its less powerful then PS3 and about par with the 360. Its also harder to develop for then 360...

Also there's NO way anything being done on PS4/XBO can be done on Wii U unless you strip the game down to "Low" settings and turn off almost every feature that makes it "Next Gen".. Which in turn just makes it a horrible port of a Next Gen game.

Mike Rentas
profile image
Iwata is the problem.

James Coote
profile image
How about a GamePad jam involving all the indie developers signed up with Nintendo (and anyone else with a Wii-U devkit), to generate some cool ideas for how to use the GamePad?

Josh Charles
profile image
Fantastic idea

John Paduch
profile image
For Sony (with a strong non-japanese component to its games division) and MS, this would be a great idea. For Nintendo, with its notoriously stubborn japanese corporate culture, I doubt very much that this would change anything.. and that's assuming they'd greenlight (or even acknowledge with positive publicity) such an event to begin with.

Alex Rose
profile image
This is a really cool idea, and it could spread to everyone with a Wii U in the next year with the advancements made on modding the Wii U pad to work on PC.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8YgVVtNRjg

At Chaos Communications Convention they showed Dolphin successfully running, though crashing. If more progress is made there, a jam could totally happen that anyone with a PC and a Wii U pad could get involved with.

Benjamin Quintero
profile image
Alex - I saw this video and immediately saw the cool factor here. I would LOVE to see Nintendo release a driver/api for WiiU Gamepad much like Microsoft did for Kinect. It could be a huge boost for Nintendo, especially if they started selling the Gamepad at a profitable price point. The Gamepad may become larger than the console in the short-term but could spark new developers to join the 3rd party group under Nintendo.

Josh Charles
profile image
I guess I'll follow up to my first point saying that this is a fantastic idea.

First, I think we should open this up to include developers who aren't signed up with Nintendo. As some have alluded to, I don't think the value is in the ideas that may or may not come out of doing something like this. Nintendo has the resources for a lot of that as it is.

Rather, I think the value lies in getting dev kits in front of indie developers who may not have otherwise had access to or experimented with the Wii-U yet. The networking and relationship building opportunities and event like this provides could be especially valuable for Nintendo long-term if managed and conducted properly.

James Coote
profile image
Actually, I just remembered, Nintendo did a game jam with the Wii-U late last year in Ireland (I forget exactly where). But it wasn't well advertised, both before and after the event.

Also, that was using their Web Framework, whereas it'd probably be better for them to make Unity the focus (at least going by last weekend's Global Game Jam, where about 80% of games at my site were made using Unity).

The practical problem is the devkits are all covered by NDA's and strict controls over who gets one. I think the whole concept of a devkit is a bit of an anachronism and an anathema to indie game development, but I can't imagine Nintendo just throwing the doors open overnight to whoever fancies making a Wii-U game for the weekend.

Also, personally, I signed up to the big 3 console maker's indie programs at roughly the same time, and so far, I've only got a Wii-U devkit on my desk to show from it. So a Wii-U game jam would be a good way to maximise my own use of it.

Christian Nutt
profile image
The Web Framework is actually pretty decent, inasmuch as you can use HMTL5 engines like Impact.js with it!

Marouf Arnaout
profile image
Hopefully, Nintendo either gives in and starts making games for third party consoles or they make a proper next-gen console that can easily support blockbuster third party games and comes with a more traditional controller. They could even keep all the Wii stuff as an add-on in the same way the Xbox has the kinect and PlayStation the move. I don't know about other people but I know that if there was a console I could play both GTA V or Skyrim and Mario Kart on I'd buy it in a heartbeat. and while, they may have to wait for the next generation of consoles to do so, they could at least release an alternative controller for the Wii U which I think would give developers more incentive to make games for the system.

Eric Harris
profile image
Yeah but they don't make enough money that way. And if you chose GTA V over Mario Kart, what is preventing you from buying a Wii U, like you bought a XBone/PS4 for GTA V? I think it is very telling, you prefer GTA over Mario Kart. Therefore, you prefer PS4/XBone to Mario Kart. The systems must make exclusive software to survive, otherwise it is just comparing hardware.

Luis Blondet
profile image
Wow. No Pokemon or Zelda MMO for the Wii U? No 2-D sandbox with Mario characters?

WTF is wrong with Nintendo!? Fans everywhere are sitting here waiting for a good reason to give them our money. smh

Christian Nutt
profile image
Zelda MMO sounds like a good idea to you? Honestly?

Not trying to be flip, just don't see what "MMO" has to do with what's good about that franchise, at all.

Josh Charles
profile image
Fans everywhere seem to be buying those franchises just fine as they are.

Eric Harris
profile image
@ Luis
Which MMOs have been making the kind of money Nintendo makes?

Wylie Garvin
profile image
"However, Iwata acknowledged that smart devices are altered lifestyles dramatically"

Perhaps this sentence are a wrong word in it ?

Jake Ritchie
profile image
I won't pretend I understand the business enough to tell say what they should do but what I do know this: If Nintendo started to release games from their main series on Steam, myself and about 30+ of my friends, family and co-workers would snatch them right up. None of these acquaintances are willing to drop a cent on a Wii U or 3DS, however.

It seems to me that A LOT of kids who grew up on Nintendo in the late 80's and 90's have dropped consoles and switched to PC, unless the area around me is an anomaly.

Kids today know and care more about Angry Birds and MineCraft than Mario and Zelda. I think Nintendo over-estimates the power of it's influence with the youngsters. It might help them to try to tap in to existing fans and be less concerned about converting new ones.

Just saying, that's how it looks from here.

Eric Harris
profile image
Interesting point of view, but can you explain why you would not buy a Wii U console(assuming you had the money) to play a Wii U game, but will buy the game from Steam on a PC?

Bob Johnson
profile image
@Jake

You forgot 2006-2010 when Mario Kart and Super Mario Bros sold 25 million on the Wii and even more on the DS. And how successful those machines were.

Also I don't think there are many old adults who grew up in the 80s who would buy a lot of Nintendo games on STeam and yet never would buy a Nintendo console. It doesn't make a ton of sense. Yes I can see how many might only want a game or two, and thus wouldn't get a console. ...but if you really wanted to play Nintendo games you'd buy their consoles or handhelds. They really aren't very expensive especially if you wait a few years after launch and consider resale value after a few years.

Scott Lavigne
profile image
@Bob

As one such person, it makes sense to me. I've owned every Nintendo console since the NES until the Wii U and had all the handhelds until the DS.

As a young teenager whose entertainment budget was limited by my parents, I regretted having asked for a GCN near the end of its life (but Melee is my second most hours logged for a game ever) with probably only 12 titles owned, half of which I disliked. I got a PS2 two years or so after release and spent most of my time on that instead (thanks to 3rd party titles).

I did the same thing with the Wii. I was a bit older, so I had some money of my own to spend, but still not much. I ended up with maybe 5 titles for my Wii that I played to any notable extent. Friends and I played Brawl and Mario Kart for brief stints, but most of our get-togethers focused on 360 or PS2. I built my first PC a few years ago and bought a PS3 a little over a year ago. I have about 15 titles for PS3, and only regret buying a couple. I've already spent way more time on my PS3 than I ever did on my Wii, which I probably haven't turned on in 3 years.

I bought a PSP over the DS. The hardware was very apparently worse, I didn't care about what the touchscreen offered, and with time, I saw how poorly the touch screens held up to natural wear (although as I didn't own one myself, this could just be roughness from the user, irrelevant either way). There were a handful of titles I was interested in over the DS's life (just like ended up being true of the GCN and Wii), but not enough to split the premium of the hardware across the price, especially when I didn't want to play those titles on the unit anyways. Pretty much all of this has been true for the 3DS as well.

I feel bad paying a premium for a handheld (that I'll only use at home), for a touch screen, for 3D, for weak hardware (in the case of the Wii U). Because I get no inherent value from the hardware, I'm effectively just paying a higher price on each game that I want, with that amount becoming less as I buy more games. There's no title for Wii U that I will pay over $100 for yet. I doubt there ever will be. I doubt, based on history, that there will be enough games I care about for that price to become reasonable. I've never cared about Nintendo's hardware. Ever. I want their software, but I've learned over the last decade that there's tons of great software on other platforms, in comparable quality and greater amounts with some actual inherent value in the hardware I pay a premium for, that I don't need to buy their hardware anymore.

I want Mario. I want Zelda. I don't want a Wii U. If the next Zelda (for example) ends up NEEDING the little bit of exclusive capability the Wii U offers, I'm honestly probably not interested in it anyways, another thing that Nintendo has made an effort to teach players over the Wii's life. If they release all their first party titles for Wii U and I'm still interested in them near the end of the Wii U's life, I may pick them up, with everything at reduced prices, but there's no way I can justify buying the hardware before then.

Andy Lundell
profile image
Trading primarily on Nostalgia is risky.

It causes your age block to drift upwards, and makes it harder to attract people at the young end of the scale. Long term this causes a downward trend in numbers.

The (mainstream American) comic book industry go locked into this problem badly around the year 2000, and their solution was to be bought out by movie companies. I'm not sure Nintendo would have that out.

Douglas Scheinberg
profile image
If Nintendo made a phone, would you buy it?

Scott Lavigne
profile image
Potentially, but I doubt it. The titles I care about from Nintendo don't translate very well to all-touch, and I don't think they could tack on anything similar to a gamepad without it being cumbersome. I'd love to be proven wrong, but I doubt I will be.

Also, I feel like a Nintendo phone could very easily be a detriment to them with younger audiences if not handled well. Kids today already get real phones, the same toys the adults use, and they get to be responsible for them. If a Nintendo phone comes with heavy nanny features (like a lot of their software does), I could see having a Nintendo phone becoming a point of teasing for kids. That's pretty speculative, though. By no means am I an expert on the related fields.

Jonathan Murphy
profile image
$11 million Nintendo. Pay me, or hire someone who can fix your mess soon. Portable isn't their problem. It's the console.

SD Marlow
profile image
I guess this Campbell's commercial came out a few months ago, but I just saw it for the first time tonight (because I'm down too about 2 hours of worthwhile TV a week). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UaUmcgt87U0

If that is the level of awareness they are shooting for... well it's going to be a very bad year for them.

Jay N
profile image
Well, at least Nintendo now has a plan, a «10 year plan», something they seem to have severely lacked in the past. There was a time a Nintendo console wouldn't launch without a flagship title. The GCN, Wii and Wii U (and the 3DS) all launched without one, and all but one have underperformed compared to the company's expectations. Just goes to show how important it is to have a well-functioning production pipeline if you're going to pull the weight all by yourself.

Bob Johnson
profile image
THe reality there is a reason for this. Games take a lot longer to make nowadays than they pre-GameCube.

they just can't make a flagship title years in advance of when the hardware actually comes out. They are usually still supporting the current platform. And their next hardware isn't ironed out yet.

Huck Terrister
profile image
"I am here to tell you about our future, and to begin with, I would like to mention what Nintendo will not change"

Saying a lot with a little, there.

Francisco Javier Espejo Gargallo
profile image
Nintendo Brand is so powerfull and still they got so much to improve... the problem with Nintendo is that they mus kep their IPs relevant, or they will be in the horror task o getting relevant IPs from scratch.

By the Way, for me, what Nintendo is lacking the most are: A) Game series continues B) Social games.

Think that they should go that route on game apart from looking to new markets like Quality of Life.


none
 
Comment: