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Microsoft teases DirectX 12 unveil for GDC
Microsoft teases DirectX 12 unveil for GDC
March 5, 2014 | By Christian Nutt

March 5, 2014 | By Christian Nutt
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Newsbrief: Though details are as yet scant, Microsoft has put up a site to tease the reveal of DirectX 12, its latest collection of APIs for game developers. No word has come so far on what operating systems or devices DX12 will support.

The simple message "Rumors of our demise have been greatly exaggerated... #DirectX12 is coming to #GDC," was tweeted on the new DirectX 12 Twitter account -- as of this writing, its only tweet. It's an acknowledgment of rumors that DirectX would not be continued after version 11, which launched in 2008.

The DX12 tweet also contained a link to a teaser site for the DirectX 12 unveiling, which is set for March 20, 2014 at 10 AM Pacific time, alongside the upcoming Game Developers Conference in San Francisco.

You can expect more coverage on DirectX 12 from Gamasutra at that time.


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Comments


Nathan Mates
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I would hope that they bring such changes to older OSs. For example, DirectX 9 was backported to Windows 2000 through the February 2010 release.

I will not be upgrading my operating system (main box at home: Win 7/64) to get a new DirectX. Or a new Internet Explorer. In recent years, Microsoft has tied such components to operating systems, as if people will upgrade just for kicks. Operating systems aren't like cars where you can tweak the seat and mirrors and drive off. They're closer to houses, where moving is a significant amount of work, and a pave-and-reinstall for anything but simple changes to Windows versions.

The Mantle drivers (currently in beta) on AMD's site are for Windows 7+, and 32/64 bit. According to the latest Steam survey, that covers ~89% of their users. I hope that kind of widespread support is also seen from DX12.

Merc Hoffner
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Well, the problem is that software isn't like physical stuff: it never wears out and it weighs nothing, so it doesn't degrade or appreciate over time (otherwise it would need to be replaced or traded).

Unlike a house or a car, as long as software is stable and efficient, the only reason to buy new software is if it offers new features. Microsoft really painted themselves into a corner with XP, because since it was finally stable and feature rich users could finally live without upgrading. Their only incentive to replace the operating systems is new features.

So Microsoft tries to work any new bit of kit they have into being a feature point to sell the new OS. Because they have so little else. And if it's available on the old OS (for free - that's the expectation and the standard), then they've run out of reasons for you to buy the new gear. Unfortunately DX12 is some of the best stuff they can come up with as a reason to buy beyond Windows 8. Heck, beyond Windows 7!

Ron Dippold
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What they sent out a year ago was 'The XNA/DirectX expertise was created to recognize community leaders who focused on XNA Game Studio and/or DirectX development. Presently the XNA Game Studio is not in active development and DirectX is no longer evolving as a technology.'

I guess they changed their minds or the wording was poor.

bukan iJam
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They change their mind of course. directx 9 is the last directx that are heavily used by the industry(xbox360). although directx 10 and 11 are used in some pc games, theyre are insignificant and used mostly as gimmick.

Freek Hoekstra
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well Xbox one requires you to use Direct X in fact I believe it is fully compulsory at this time.

Michael G
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I don't think they ever said DirectX was no longer in development, just that it was being folded into the main Windows development (since it's now a required and pre-installed component).

Ron Dippold
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@Michael: If that's what 'no longer evolving as a technology' means, then it's definitely very poor wording. I could see that, though.

Michael G
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Well that's what they did. Messaging tends not to be done by programmers.

Ron Dippold
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After checking out the description of this on GDC's site ( http://schedule.gdconf.com/session-id/828184 ) it sounds an awful lot like AMD's Mantle thing. Perhaps that lit a fire.

Curtis Turner - IceIYIaN
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Dang, DX11 in 2008. Seems like forever ago... Doesn't XNA use DX9?

What else is in competition with DX? Besides OpenGL?

I assume DX12 is going to link Windows 8, Windows Phone 8, X-BoX OnE, and possibly Internet Explorer(?) together. Mainly focused on C++ programming. I wonder if there will be a C# version for n00bZ like me?

Honestly, there's so many platforms these days. With cross-platform development overtaking, it seems more logical to just make an OpenGL game these days?

Greg Quinn
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October 2009 is actually the correct release for DX11. Something about 2008 just seemed too long ago :)

Olivier Riedo
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At MS techdays the official stance regarding c# directx support is to use sharpDX, which is a managed wrapper for all available directX versions, and to be fair it's excellent advice, SharpDX does the work well.

Patrik Kotiranta Lundbeg
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C++ isn't hard, you will soon feel at home if you are coming from C#. I traveled int the opposite direction and was coding within a day but if that isn't your cup of tea...

Why not give Unity3D a shot? That engine is the reason why I learned C#. I personally love to work with the engine, its simple but flexible, got a nice license and is cross-platform (supports all major platforms from mobiles to computers and consoles) etc.

Alex Covic
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Cross-platform OpenGL instead - ... just a thought ... unless you want to be a "MS Windows 9" exclusive game?

Freek Hoekstra
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well Xbox one requires you to use DX anyways...
and most games on windows use a similar DX path as well... (sometimes shared with openGL)
so this is not completely fair.

Michael Thornberg
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I wouldn't worry too much about xbox one since it's a failure. Besides.. most platforms supports some variants of OpenGL so it won't hurt to have some focus on that.


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