Gamasutra: The Art & Business of Making Gamesspacer
View All     RSS
October 31, 2014
arrowPress Releases
October 31, 2014
PR Newswire
View All





If you enjoy reading this site, you might also want to check out these UBM Tech sites:


DirectX 12: How, why, and when
DirectX 12: How, why, and when
March 21, 2014 | By Mike Rose

March 21, 2014 | By Mike Rose
Comments
    10 comments
More: Console/PC, Business/Marketing, GDC



We knew DirectX 12 was on the way at GDC, but now Microsoft has lifted the veil on the next version of Direct3D, enabling richer scenes, more objects, and proper utilization of the latest GPU hardware.

The aim of DirectX 12, says Microsoft's Matt Sandy, is to provide an API that works across all platforms and devices, and provides a lower level of hardware abstraction than seen before.

It's all about reducing GPU overhead, improving CPU utilization and bringing far more efficient algorithms, such that games will be able to run far more smoothly with improved multithread scaling and concise pipeline state objects.

Notably, DirectX 12 will run on any PC with supported graphics hardware, which Microsoft says is around 80 percent of the "gamer PCs" currently being sold.

DirectX 12 is scheduled for a Holiday 2015 release. You can read more about it in the official blog post.


Related Jobs

InnoGames GmbH
InnoGames GmbH — Hamburg, Germany
[10.31.14]

Mobile Developer C++ (m/f)
The College of New Jersey
The College of New Jersey — Ewing, New Jersey, United States
[10.31.14]

Assistant Professor - Interactive Multi Media - Tenure Track
Next Games
Next Games — Helsinki, Finland
[10.31.14]

Senior Level Designer
Activision Publishing
Activision Publishing — Santa Monica, California, United States
[10.31.14]

Tools Programmer-Central Team










Comments


Ian Morrison
profile image
So... basically just a performance update?

Freek Hoekstra
profile image
directX 11 but then done well it seems.
might still have been a major overhaul but it is designed to utilize the same hardware.

Brad Borne
profile image
Going to be interesting to see. Looks like all of the performance gains are from developers being allowed to code closer to the metal, which could mean more card specific issues, performance discrepancies, and incompatibilities than ever before. I'd love to hear some thoughts from PC devs, though, if coding for each individual card will be a new circle of developer hell, or if this is actually as great as it sounds.

Michael Thornberg
profile image
pfft... yeah we know... OpenGL is getting popular again with so many platforms needing it. Time to update it again, and also.. let's do business as usual and tie it to [require] the next version of Windows *only*. Yeah... it will take some time before anyone cares. How about stop working against the rest of the world for a change? And isn't it time to update OpenGL in windows? Oh yeah.. I forgot.. you hate it.

Alex Covic
profile image
Goodbye 'managed DirectX code' - once again - welcome C++ ...

Olivier Riedo
profile image
It's a good bet that Sharpdx will add support for it though.

Chris Melby
profile image
If it doesn't support Windows 7, I don't care...

Jane Castle
profile image
If Microsoft's past behavior is anything to go by... it won't.......

Chris Melby
profile image
How dare you out dot me. :)

Daniel Burke
profile image
Oh, works across all platforms.. does this mean we are going to have to support DX12 in Linux, Android, iOS and OS-X as well?

Oh wait.. MS version of "cross platform" haha, yeah cool another new API I never need to bother learning, cool.


none
 
Comment: