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 EVE: Valkyrie  drops Unity in favor of Unreal Engine 4
EVE: Valkyrie drops Unity in favor of Unreal Engine 4
May 1, 2014 | By Alex Wawro

May 1, 2014 | By Alex Wawro
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    10 comments
More: Console/PC, Design



CCP Games announced yesterday that its upcoming virtual reality space dogfighting game EVE: Valkyrie has been completely redesigned to run on Unreal Engine 4. Until now, the game had been running on Unity.

The shift was announced during the keynote of CCP's annual Fanfest event, which is going on right now in Reykjavik, Iceland. PCWorld reports that the engine change was due in part to the development team's greater familiarity with the Unreal Engine, which also powers Dust 514.

During the keynote CCP also announced that it has hired Katee Sackhoff, who played Starbuck in the most recent Battlestar Galactica TV series, to play a leading role in EVE: Valkyrie.

The VR dogfighting game, which began life as the EVE:VR prototype, was showcased almost a year ago at CCP's last Fanfest event in Iceland. Last September the company recruited former EA DICE developer Owen O'Brien to lead the EVE: Valkyrie team as executive producer.

The game is planned to come to PC and PlayStation 4 via the Oculus Rift and Sony's upcoming Project Morpheus VR headset. Oculus VR is still co-publishing the game, and thus EVE: Valkyrie is still expected to launch as a Rift exclusive alongside the retail version of the Rift headset.


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Comments


Terry Matthes
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Why anyone is with Unity now is beyond me.

Chris Book
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Well, its still more newb-friendly I think. The asset store is pretty fleshed out and basically anything you need to get going can be downloaded or bought. But between UE4 and the CryEngine subscription model, I can see Unity starting to take some serious losses to its licenses.

Greg Quinn
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One word... C#

That and perhaps immature mobile support are the only things from Unreal Engine completely owning Unity.

But when UE4's mobile support matures...

Michael Thornberg
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Not to be blunt but UE4 also have support for C#. Being part of the whole Visual Studio infrastructure and all.

Chris Hendricks
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Unreal still seems to be geared towards the creation of only certain kinds of games: first-person shooters, car racing games, MMOs, etc. But would you choose Unreal to make a hidden object game, or 2D physics-based puzzler, or a side-scrolling platformer? Maybe, but I'm not aware of many. Unity caters to all kinds of games and game creators.

Michael Thornberg
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So does UE4. I'm guessing you haven't tried it? :) It supports making the same kind of games as Unity does. They have plenty of material to start from, use freely etc.. with as well. Personally I haven't regretted changing for even a second. The best change I ever did. Which is a pity, because I honestly like Unity, their pricing however is bonkers.

Chris Hendricks
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Correct, I haven't tried it. However, when I go to the Unreal site, the types of games used to showcase the engine are limited to pretty much what I described. If they want to attract a larger variety of developers, perhaps they should promote the engine's versatility?

Jennis Kartens
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UDK/UE3 sure. UE4 has matured and offersm ore as Unity does for less money. There is no reason for Unity anymore. Thankfully.

Rui Mota
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Only, or when, they get a better 2D support/ pipeline (paper2d was hinted for 4.2) they will challenge unity´s crown.
I´m specially interested on seeing how Blueprints evolve. If epic + community can build some kind of library of templates (functions?) in proper English that can totally override the need of C++. Something like Playmaker plug-in is for Unity.

Mikhail Mukin
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For now, I think they both have their use. We are using both for current projects/prototypes (Unity for mostly 2D mobile games/parts, UE4 for PC/consoles).

It is much easier to make 2D with Unity/NGUI. It is also much easier for me to write C# scripts compared to lots of boxes and arrows in blueprints. Unity is fairly stable and does not crash that much (apart from Mono/Unity debugger attachment/restart locking that seem to be not fixed for a few years now - but you just learn to detach debugger every time manually). "Change script/run game" loop is really fast (well, in Mac Editor... iOS is a different issue).

UE4 has its good parts for visual quality on high end PCs and nice and user friendly tools. I'm surprised (and concerned) with removal of script. Yes, it was not pretty - but it sort of worked for some cases. Blueprints seem to be a nice way for super simple things (or for people who do not know programming and want to do only simple things). But it is a mess to try anything complicated - blueprints do not "scale" to complicated logic, harder to check revision history, harder to debug, find specific places (blueprint search needs work...) etc. There were attempts to make "Visual programming" languages (for C++ from IBM etc) like 15 years ago - but they (AFAIK?) failed. They work nicely for "simpler" things though - like designing DB schemas etc. So if you are careful and do most of "logical" things in C++ and simple "trigger - response" in blueprints - it should work nicely in UE4.

The software cost ($20 subscription or $1500 + x) does not really matter for "real projects" in US (a tiny fraction compared to "$10k/person/month" average costs) but 5% royalty might be unpleasant for "real projects". But it is really great to have cheap and somewhat working prototyping tools! Thanks to both Unity and Epic!


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