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 Watch Dogs  hits hard, as Ubisoft needs it to
Watch Dogs hits hard, as Ubisoft needs it to
May 28, 2014 | By Christian Nutt




Today, Ubisoft announced that the hotly anticipated title Watch Dogs -- available for PC, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, and Xbox One across the major Western territories -- has broken its record for most copies of a game sold in its first 24 hours on sale.

The company calculated this using its own internal metrics; third party sales data has yet to be released.

This is good news for the company -- it is relying on Watch Dogs to help pick up slumping sales moving into its next fiscal year. With the help of Watch Dogs, the current fiscal year "should see a return to double-digit profitability," said CEO Yves Guillemot, alongside its most recent yearly financial results. "The yearís performance will be led by five games -- Assassinís Creed Unity, Far Cry 4, Just Dance, The Crew, and Watch Dogs," Guillemot added.

Creative director Jonathan Morin recently spoke to Gamasutra about the challenges of developing the open-world game, saying, "You need to define something that is not just a gimmick, but can deliver new gameplay in the entire game... The core challenge is always, 'Let's find something that will change the game.'"


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Comments


Eric Finlay
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So is the game actually fun to play? Reddit seems to be obsessing about the graphics.

David Keen
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It's fine. If you like stealth games and you like open world games, you will probably find something to like here. There's not much special or extraordinary about it, though.

Shea Rutsatz
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Seems tough to even *get* to play on PC, nevermind the graphics!

Ron Dippold
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Consensus (if there can be one) of the dozen or so reviews I've seen and a little bit of time I've spent playing is:
- GTA + ACreed + magic (the hacking is so silly it's effectively magic spells)
- Takes itself way too seriously. Nobody liked the plot or the character.
- Overwhelming number of side-things to do. Some of which actively work against the plot, but since you don't care about the plot it doesn't matter.
- Missions are very samey, but a few are very interesting.
- Once you figure your loadout you can have a ball.

Basically, this is not the next gen experience you were looking for, except maybe graphically, but you can have a lot of fun with if you ignore all the writing.

Also, if you were going to get it on PC, hold off till they fix it and uPlay.

Bruno Xavier
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I'd like to meet a game that is not like this these days.
I'm not saying these games are 'bad'; I'm just saying that is how AAA devs think games should be today. Maybe they come up with something better than that one of these days.

Eric Geer
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Definitely wouldn't want the hacking to be anything but "magic". I could imagine something terribly wrong where every hack would be a mini puzzle or quick time events.

With the amount that you use the hacking, any thing but magic wouldn't work.

Ron Dippold
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@Eric: besides the lack of effort, I'm thinking of all the physically impossible things like hacking a giant underground steam pipe to explode instantly. But, as you say, those are the right game design decisions. I mention the magic thing because I found thinking of it that way helped me go from 'hacking can't DO that' to 'whatever, it's magic, just roll with it.'

Eric Geer
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I gotcha. Yea, I guess it's weakly described in the way that ctos is the central control of everything within the electrical infrastructure in Chicago. But if you imagine real hard you could see how the steam pipe valves are probably controlled by the electrical infrastructure. I dunno. either way, i'm picking up what you're putting down.

Dane MacMahon
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Reaction seems to be kind of "meh" so far, but hype + advertising is a deadly combination. That's why companies use it.

Jarod Smiley
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It's not all hype at all man...Game is fun, its just not mind blowing, revolutionary gameplay or storytelling. If you think about it, those titles are very rare.

Dane MacMahon
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Decent fun games are something I personally feel like I am drowning in.

Terry Matthes
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I've heard Ubisoft Montreal's lead animator talk about the project at the Montreal International Games Summit and from what I saw they put a lot of work into making the open world feel alive. The animation systems in the game are quite good. They use different animation sets based on the area of the city you are in. I don't know if this is across all consoles or just Xbox One and PS4, and PC.

There are a lot of other things that make the game interesting, but from the talks I saw that impressed me the most.

Yes the hacking is like "magic", but what else would you expect? Would you rather whip out a virtual laptop and start putting in code? That would be cool with about 5% of the audience :\

Olivier Riedo
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Quadrilateral Cowboy is precisely doing the laptop coding thing and seems like it'll be tons of fun, but it's true it aims for a smaller and completely different audience.

Eric Salmon
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I was sold from the first few minutes in PewDiePie's video. Definitely picking it up (probably after E3).

I'm still waiting for GTA V's PC release date, so a good new open-world game is welcome here.

Also, I don't see how the hacking is any more magical than controlling a vehicle or handling a weapon in most video games. That's what most mechanics are all about -- cutting out the dull crap to get to the core fun.


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