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The Girl Scouts hosts its first-ever video game course
The Girl Scouts hosts its first-ever video game course
July 11, 2014 | By Mike Rose

July 11, 2014 | By Mike Rose
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The Girl Scout Leadership Institute has hosted its first-ever video game programming course, through which it hopes to encourage more girls to get into a career in making games.

As reported by DNA Info, this latest initiative aims to help girls explore and pursue jobs in fields that are male-dominated, such as science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

A group of girls aged 13 to 16 were taught how to design objects and people for their own virtual 3D world. The hope is that some will enjoy the experience to the degree that they'll want to go on further and consider a career in a STEM area of expertise.

Last year, the Girl Scouts worked alongside Women in Games International to create the first video game patch for Girl Scouts.

[Photo from DNA Info]


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Comments


Katy Smith
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I wish this was available when I was a scout! This is pretty cool :)

Mark Velthuis
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Am I missing something here? Aren't scouts supposed to be about nature and survival and stuff ?

Katy Smith
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Not really. Girl Scouts is supposed to be about building confidence, courage, and character by empowering girls. This means the skills taught have changed a lot over the years. It used to be all about life skills. When I was a scout, they were adding a bunch of entrepreneurial skills. In recent years, they have been adding more STEAM stuff. I'm not sure about Boy Scouts and what their goals are. Maybe that's what you're thinking of?

John Flush
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You are right in a lot of regards though, it seems 90% of the items they work toward are what you think Mark, and the few technology ones they have are outdated before they can even approve them. But at least they are trying.

Matthew Calderaz
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Both the Boy and Girl scouts have adopted technology themed merit badges in recent years.

The overall goals of the programs, I believe, has been to offer positive role modeling and mentoring for youths; primarily with an emphasis on getting and being used to being outdoors; but I think so long as the badges promote personal growth and development, sneaking a few technology oriented ones in doesn't betray the fundamental charter.

Amanda Lee Matthews
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Do the Boy Scouts get this too?

Dave Bleja
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Great. Having more female game designers would be one of the best things for gaming, if only to diversify the types of games we get.

I'm as tired as everyone else of the tired cliches of gaming - the buxom warriors in metal bikinis, the grotesquely over-muscled gruff male leads, the gang warfare fantasies.

Though I think it probably has less to do with overt misogyny and boys' club syndrome in the games industry, and simply more to do with the lazy lack of imagination that comes from having so many people in the industry coming from the same demographic.

When a woman was given the lead design role at Valve (one of the few times this has happened in a AAA studio that I'm aware of... I could be wrong) , she created an innovative and distinctly non-blokey game that was nevertheless one of the most widely adored games of all time (Portal). If there were many more people like her, the gaming landscape would be amazing.


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