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Women spend more on mobile games than men, says new study
Women spend more on mobile games than men, says new study
August 7, 2014 | By Mike Rose

August 7, 2014 | By Mike Rose
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    8 comments
More: Smartphone/Tablet, Business/Marketing



Women spend more on in-app purchases in mobile games than men, and spend more time playing mobile games than men, according to a new Flurry report.

The analytics company has found that women make 31 percent more in-app purchases than men, while women spend 35 percent more time playing mobile games than men.

Flurry also found that women are more loyal when it comes to sticking with a mobile game. The study found that women have a 42 percent higher week-long retention average than males, meaning that on average, they keep playing a game they are enjoying much longer than men.

But what kind of games does this apply to? Says Flurry, women spend more on genres like management, simulation, match 3 and endless runners. Men tend to stick around longer when it comes to digital card games, strategy games, sports games, shooters, and RPGs.

The full report can be found on the Flurry blog.


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Comments


James Coote
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Interesting on those genre breakdowns. I wonder which way around the cause and effect is. Whether certain genres are innately appealing to men or women, or whether the success of one or two games with a particular gender has meant developers have sought to focus their subsequent games in those genres on that specific audience?

Ian Richard
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I know in my experience "competition" is one of the biggest differences between making a game women will like vs. a men will.

Games that tend to do well for woman are usually about building up. You start with nothing and over time you'll get more. Even in the social aspects, the games are about helping one another rather than beating them down.

Games for men tend to do better if they are competitive. Men tend to want to overcome other players to prove their own skills. Leaderboards, Duels, challenges etc. are all staples of a successful "game for males".

Keep in mind these are just observations of general tendencies of the masses. They do not apply to all people* nor do I claim it's science, upbringing or plain ol' marketing.

*Personally, I hate competition and I play plenty of female market games. But I am not usual.

Christian Nutt
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Actually, "I am not usual" is the thing that sticks out to me there. It seems that things aren't cut and dried as they're often implied to be, nor are they as simplistic as they're implied to be (which is what prompted James Coote's original comment.)

I mean, look at Animal Crossing: It's very gender-neutral and it's played by people of all kinds all the time, and that's a big part of its success. But it's a rare exception (being gender-neutral, I mean.) It's also got a diversity of activities in it, as compared to a lot of superficially similar and more gender-targeted games.

Curtiss Murphy
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My wife asked me to make a game that: 'builds up', isn't full of frustration, and centered around 'helping other people succeed.' I've incorporated some of that in my current title, which oddly leaves me with a significantly female oriented experience in a typically male genre game. Only time will tell if that was a good decision or not.

After the MVP goes out (i.e. ver 1.0), I'll go back and add in some networked, collaborative, team-oriented activities that will hopefully appeal to both genders.

Christian Nutt
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There's a lot of both "build-up" and "tear-down" in one of the only genres that I've seen have a really significant gender split: the JRPG. Often you spend a lot of time in the menus working on your party layout, and then you go adventuring and kill monsters (of course, with significant storytelling along the way, generally.)

Ian Richard
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I will say that Animal Crossing is an interesting example. Normally, I'd respond "But remember, that IS a niche title"...

But after the latest release it's either a bigger niche than I'd expect or they successfully appealed to everyone inside the niche. Either way, it is indeed something worth thinking about.

Cordero W
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Color me surprised.

Evan Combs
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I'm not all that surprised. When I think about the people I know, I find that girls are all over games that are on phones while guys still very much prefer consoles/PCs.


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