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After dev goes silent, sales halted for Early Access dino game
After dev goes silent, sales halted for Early Access dino game
September 2, 2014 | By Alex Wawro

September 2, 2014 | By Alex Wawro
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    9 comments
More: Console/PC, Business/Marketing



Indie developer Supercrit's dinosaur-infested survival game The Stomping Land seems to have been removed from sale on Steam's Early Access service after going without a significant update for months.

The game still has a Steam Store page, but there is currently no way to purchase a copy and it is unclear why sales have been halted.

This is notable because it's the first time we've seen the game -- which was successfully Kickstarted to the tune of $114,000 last June and launched on Early Access in May -- functionally delisted from Steam, suggesting that something may have gone seriously awry during development.

The developer hasn't said anything publicly about the change, or indeed about the game at all in the past few months, except to issue a statement to Kotaku that the Unreal Engine 3 game was still in development and was being rebuilt to utilize Unreal Engine 4.

Developer Alex Fundora has gone silent for long periods in the past, which has driven some of his customers to launch a Change.org petition for a refund in light of their belief that Supercrit has scammed and abandoned its community.

If Fundora does decide to abandon development, he won't be alone -- the alpha-funded city-building game Towns was abandoned by its devs back in May, though you can still buy it through Steam.

Gamasutra has reached out to Fundora and Valve for more information, and we'll update with any meaningful response.


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Comments


Chris Book
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I just want to slap these people for ruining this stuff for the rest of us.

"Oh, you're Early Access? How do I know you won't end up like all these other idiots that can't plan things?"

Andy Lundell
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There were always going to be failures.

Game development is far from risk-free, and Early Access, almost by definition, is going to appeal to the studios on a tight budget.

Mark Ludlow
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If you weren't asking that question already then I think you misunderstand what Early Access actually is. It is a promise by developers that they are working to complete a game, however, as the recent change by Steam indicates after Towns' failure to complete, you are paying for the game at that point in time only and any future updates or continued development of the game is essentially a bonus.

Benjamin McCallister
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I just think its great steam actually took it off the list. The more stuff like this happens, the closer we get to more game curation on steam, which means less trash which means better games will make it on there (or at least last) while the trash dies a sad death.

Kevin Fishburne
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Someone should Kickstart a game called "Developer's Quest: So You Want to Be a Developer". The game itself will consist of GIMP, Blender, Audacity, a text editor and GCC. Beer, imagination, creativity, thousands of man hours of hard work and an inhuman force of will sold separately.

Marvin Papin
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Early access could be an opportunity. But too many people don't know what's about finishing a game. Now, if you are really able to finish the game, just do it and release the real version.

Maybe games are art, maybe not but how can you appreciate a not finished game, wouldn't it has been better to play directly the last version, can you think beyond low graphics or bugs.

Some have a limited money but if you're lacking of money even with a kickstarter, you're already failing.


I really want to heard what's the point. And it needs to point out to force people to finish their game and learn to finish games instead of failing much. I know it's not the whole independent devs who are concerned but it gives a really bad opinion of the game industry.

Since they release "something", doesn't it free them from their duties toward the kickstarter campaign ?

Sad.

I hope I'm wrong and it's just about something like a right conflict but with the level of polish of the game and the initial objective, I don't think so.

Dare Man
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I would hope Valve decides to take more proactive role in dealings on Steam store.

It's great they gave us developers and consumers Early Access but I hope there will be some minimum standards enforced by Valve. This would give some sense of security to people who decide to support the unfinished project.

Benjamin McCallister
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I've been saying for months the only thing they need to do is require a fully playable demo to post something to greenlight.

If the demo is nothing, or unplayable or buggy, guess what, NO GREENLIGHT

Todd Boyd
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change.org? Are you f!@#ing serious? I really don't think that people understand what that site is *supposed* to be about. Why affect change in our democratic system when instead we could bug the White House to force an indie developer to give us refunds on a game that was never guaranteed to see the light of day to begin with?!


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