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PS3 Motion Controller Pushed To Fall 2010
PS3 Motion Controller Pushed To Fall 2010
January 20, 2010 | By Leigh Alexander

January 20, 2010 | By Leigh Alexander
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    20 comments
More: Console/PC



Sony says its yet-unnamed motion control peripheral for the PlayStation 3 will launch worldwide in Fall 2010, despite previously targeting a spring release.

The reason for the push-back? Sony would rather launch with a wider and stronger software lineup, says Sony Computer Entertainment president and CEO Kaz Hirai.

"We have decided to release the Motion Controller in fall 2010 when we will be able to offer an exciting and varied line-up of software titles that will deliver the new entertainment experience to PS3 users," he said in a statement.

The company also stressed its high aims for the new input device, claiming it would make it the "de facto controller" of the platform along with its DualShock. This would differentiate it from a simple accessory intended for just a few games -- as has been the case with the PlayStation Eye camera, with which the motion controller will work.

It's a reiteration of the stance expressed by Worldwide Studios boss Shuhei Yoshida, who in an October 2009 Gamasutra interview said its motion controller would be positioned "as a hardware platform."

Says Hirai today: "We will continue to work to have a comprehensive portfolio of attractive and innovative games for the Motion Controller, not only from SCE Worldwide Studios but also from the third party developers and publishers, whom we have been working closely with."

"We look forward to soon unveiling the exciting software line-up that further expands and defines the PS3 platform as the ultimate entertainment system for the home," he concludes.


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Comments


Tawna Evans
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It looks so phalic. :-/

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E Zachary Knight
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@John,



I think you are correct.



I large portion of the 360 and PS3 fan base have already dismissed the Wii and its motion controls. There are some 360 and PS3 fans that are excited about the prospect of Wii style games in HD, but I think they are in the minority when taken from the overall PS3/360 fanbase.



I also don't think this will win over many people who only have a Wii. Most will consider it unnecessary to buy yet another console and an accessory in order to play the same style of games they are currently playing on the Wii.



So I don't think this or the Natal will do as well as Microsoft and Sony hope.

Roberto Alfonso
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"The company also stressed its high aims for the new input device, claiming it would make it the "de facto controller" of the platform along with its DualShock."

That is the important part. Wii is a success because the remote is mandatory. And that is why I think Natal will have a hard time building its base, since it will be considered an addon.



By the way, the dual shock is too big to be held in a single hand, maybe they should create some smaller version, with just one analog and two buttons, adding some motion sensing capabilities to it as well...

Joshua Sterns
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If Sony or Microsoft find a new blockbuster game that utilizes motion controls, then the new tech may find a larger following. Something revolutionary that can hook the jaded players.

david vink
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I think this could work. I like this controller more than Natal, personally. And the idea that they want to make this the main controller with the sixaxis as backup sounds great to me.

Caleb Garner
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I personally think that MS and Sony just want to "check off" on the one aspect that really did give the Wii a unique spin that the others simply couldn't touch. No matter how many shaders and HD options. The Wii has always had them both beat in this aspect. Most likely it's not to win "this round" but gearing up and working out issues for the next generation of game systems. Nintendo won't be able to rely on gimmicks to offset keeping up with the graphics war Sony and MS fight over.

Jean Auguste
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Hi (and happy New Eve),





Wii/Arc redefined the relationship you had with your console. Natal intends to redefine the relationship you have with your refrigerator (which also happen to be a console).



While the former can't possibly have the same appeal to the already equipped Wii audience (and at a more affordable price), the latter has the sole purpose to sell tons of services without it looking like services placement.





The decision from Sony (fall 2010) has a lot to do with counter hyping Natal or whatever tool Nintendo will invent, a lot to do with crowding the market with a third look alike product, a lot to do with confusing the customer's mind during Xmas 2010 purchases.





Intelligent move but no long term intention behind.

William Rosas
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This definitely has promise, but I worry about making it the main controller over the dual shock. What happens with the existing catalog of games? Are they supported by the new controller? If I remember right, trophies used to be optional and developers hardly used them. For it to take over as the main controller, I'd imagine Sony would have to make it mandatory in all future games.

Bob Stevens
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It took Nintendo at least 3 tries to get motion controls that caught on, I don't see why people should immediately dismiss this. If I cared about motion controls I wouldn't be particularly happy with the Wii's limitations. On the other hand this looks like it could be interesting, especially since it's a separate peripheral and thus the only games that will use it are the games that are designed for it.

Bryson Whiteman
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Sony and Microsoft have interesting motion peripheral technologies but they still don't have Nintendo games. It'll take some incredibly compelling software to warrant buying new peripherals for already expensive consoles.



I'm hoping for the best.

Amir Sharar
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"If Sony or Microsoft find a new blockbuster game that utilizes motion controls, then the new tech may find a larger following. Something revolutionary that can hook the jaded players."



Bingo!



I feel that much of the gaming industry still doesn't get it.



It's ALL about software. The hardware itself is important (ultimately it is the accessibility that encourages users to try the game out, but there must be an appeal to the game in the first place) but still takes a backseat to what sort of software is available for it. And so Sony's move here has to be appreciated.



People didn't buy a DDR Dance Mat...they bought Dance Dance Revolution. Users didn't buy a plastic guitar, they bought Guitar Hero. Didn't buy a Wiimote for the novelty, they bought Wii w/ Wii Sports for family fun.



Yes, the controller should be user-friendly, reliable, and robust, but too much focus on selling the controller and not enough on software can turn it into another "Activator" (motion based peripheral from SEGA, which was responsive and largely technically sound, but lacked appealing software).



"Appealing software" meaning that the games are understandable and appealing; things like EyeToy mini-games aren't going to cut it. People can relate to playing guitar, dancing, singing, or bowling. People can't necessarily relate to juggling balls on their arms, no matter how much us programmers like to think how fun that is.



Whether consumers think the controller is an "add-on" or not doesn't mean anything. Add-ons like Wii Motion Plus as well as peripheral based games like DDR, Rock Band and Guitar Hero sell well regardless. Being a pack-in isn't as important as having enticing software.

Jean Auguste
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erratum :

"has something to do with" instead of "has a lot to do with".

Ian Uniacke
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"The company also stressed its high aims for the new input device, claiming it would make it the "de facto controller" of the platform along with its DualShock. "



That comment just makes no sense whatsoever while at first glance it sounds like it says a lot. What does this even mean? Nothing that's what. It's just Sony trying to make people feel like their eye toy add on will be well supported.

Uyiosa Iyamu
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I agree with David Vink, from a gaming perspective, the PS3 controller has a lot of potential.



Despite how innovative and hands free the Natal is, the lack of a standard controller will turn a lot of developers off. Depending on what they do with the motion control wand, it could go a long way to actually being the controller (or the basis of one) of all the future PS3 games. They are making the right call pushing it back, although unless they release a bunch of top tier and unique software lineup in the fall, or they won't grab a lot of gamers.



Copying the Wii's mini-game collections, FPS or exercise games won't cut it, especially if they want to convert traditional gamers on the hardware.

Mark Tran
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The new MS and Sony control schemes may not be as big of a hit right upon release, but I can see it working really well for them in the long run. The PS3 and 360 are consoles with a lot of power. They'll be able to last a long time, and I think that's exactly what Microsoft and Sony have in mind. Their "next-gen" doesn't require a new system, it just requires new control. While right now, the Wii holds the market in terms of motion control games, and will likely not lose its reign to its competitors, once software begin to push the boundaries of the Wii's hardware, they'll have to upgrade. In other words, consumers will have to buy a new Nintendo console, or, they could continue to use their PS3's or 360's. That would be a huge, possibly lethal blow to Nintendo, when the time comes. It's a battle of attrition, and while the Wii lays fortified in its tower, eventually, its just going to run out of processing and graphical power.

gstarr W
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By the time Nintendo decides to go HD, the technology will be cheap. The Wii-HD with the SuperWiimote that already has motion plus built in it, that will come in varying colors, will cost only a $100. The gaming press will label it "3 Gamecubes duct-taped together" and the public will run out and buy it because it will be backwards compatible and include an HD copy of - your choice - Wii sports HD, Pokemon HD, or Zelda HD. You know I'm right. Some of you are already salivating.

Ryan Schaefer
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I'm a skeptic too at this point. I haven't seen anything the wand will do that the Wii hasn't already done. It seems that most ps3 owners aren't interested in the Wii and those that are already have one so there's not really a compelling reason to buy this. We would need to see something really impressive and unique to convince ps3 owners that this isn't just a wiimote clone.

Jonathan Gilmore
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I think the motion controller devices could work for both Sony and MS in that they attract members of the household that are non-gamers to the consoles. Parents of gamers might get interested if they can also participate and it might lead to more software purchases in homes that already have consoles and non console owning families could buy a console as a result.



Still, as others have pointed out that all depends on there being some compelling software. Neither Sony nor MS will be able to rely on Mario but if they can make a more compelling version of Wii Fit or Wii Sports there might be some success, though still probably not the same kind of success that the Wii has had. MS will be able to immediately compete with the Wii on price but it is still a more intimidating (albeit more complete) machine than the Wii. Sony may by holiday 2011 be able to price compete with the Wii and 360/Natal, and it will probably have to even if the console continues to sell at a small loss.


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