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Activision CFO Tippl Gets New Role, Compensation
Activision CFO Tippl Gets New Role, Compensation
March 29, 2010 | By Leigh Alexander

March 29, 2010 | By Leigh Alexander
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    11 comments
More: Console/PC



Activision chief financial officer Thomas Tippl will become the mega-publisher's chief operating officer, continuing to hold the CFO role until a replacement is hired to fill that spot.

Tippl has also been the company's chief corporate officer, a title he resigns as he migrates roles. In the SEC filing that unveils the title shuffle for Tippl, who's held financial chief executive roles with Activision since 2005, it's revealed he'll be earning $850,000 per year going forward.

Tippl will also have the opportunity to earn annual percentage increases for his salary, an amount "at least equal" to a percentage that the company's Board agrees upon for executives at Activision. He'll also be eligible for a yearly bonus aimed at 120 percent of his salary, depending on his performance and that of the company.

Tippl also receives various stock options, including performance shares that vest every February from 2011 to 2014, provided the company makes its goals. Even if it misses some, his shares will still vest, according to Activision, if the company "over-delivers" in a subsequent year and makes up for its shortfalls.


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Comments


Adam Piotuch
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A little overpaid much?

Matt Ross
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no wonder these publishers have to set about destroying the fun of playing and developing games in search of a quick buck when they are paying executives this much.

Alan Youngblood
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If I understand this right, it sounds like this guy makes just about all the decisions involving money and crunch. That being said:



A message to Mr. Tippl: even if it means cutting some of your own wealth, look out for the workers of your company. Pay them what they are worth. Do not force them to crunch. Games can be made, and made well without crunch. It's not only a good idea, and "good for business" to do all this, it's now more than ever your job.



Does anyone have doubts about how pyramidal hierarchies work? There's a lot of strong support at the bottom(the foundation). Otherwise everything would topple. Support them if you want to support yourself. That is all.

David Tarris
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@Adam and Matt - Can we drop the "why don't I get paid that much?" whining already? This isn't some evil publishing empire determining these people's pay, it's the market. Supply and demand. There is a limited supply of people who have the talent and experience to do these jobs, and they get paid a lot. It's no different from what any other company would do, and despite how "unfair" it may seem, we as consumers enable it to happen. Public companies wouldn't pay these people this much if it didn't help the company in the end (for the most part).



@Michael - Do you like Huey Lewis and the news? Their early work was a little too new wave for my tastes, but when Sports came out in '83, I think they really came into their own, commercial and artistically. The whole album has a clear, crisp sound, and a new sheen of consummate professionalism that really gives the songs a big boost. He's been compared to Elvis Costello, but I think Huey has a far much more bitter, cynical sense of humour.

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Ishaan Sahdev
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Am I the only one that looks at that picture and sees Gene Hackman?

gus one
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The reality is if you want the best people then that is the cost. If you want seasoned experienced executives then you have to be prepared to pay the market rate period. It's not complicated and as David said it applies to all industries not just this one. Still it gives the have-nots and the jealous a stick to beat the air with and a chance for them to do their "The World isn't fair' speech. I'm a shareholder in ATVI. I want the best man in the job and I'll pay him whatever he wants to do that (within reason and market rates applied).

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Mark Morrison
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@ Ishaan, that is just plain wrong. Gene deserves better.

Mark Harris
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@bob dillan



Fine examples of mismanagement, and if you are a shareholder for either Ford or a bailed out financial company then you have every right to call for those executives to be fired. With your indisputable logic and facts you should have no trouble convincing the other shareholders and board members to let those ignorant morons go.



As an aside, governments bailing out industries is as much a failure of the government as it is the failure of the companies. It just distorts markets. Think of it this way, if Joe Exec is being paid X dollars and runs his company into the ground, the company then fails, and Joe's salary falls to 0. He is then being paid exactly what he is worth, as determined by the market. However, if that company is bailed out then he is rewarded for his stupidity and has a chance to continue down his path. Well played.



Regardless of the economic theory, Activision is a successful company and can afford to pay it's execs well. If shareholders are pissed then they have every opportunity to let the board know, and if the board doesn't act they can elect a new board. Shareholder action can fix any problem, since they own the company. Most shareholders don't bother, though.


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