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 Streets of Rage  Fan Remake Taken Down At Sega's Request
Streets of Rage Fan Remake Taken Down At Sega's Request
April 12, 2011 | By Mike Rose

April 12, 2011 | By Mike Rose
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    26 comments
More: Console/PC, Business/Marketing



A fan remake of the classic Genesis beat 'em up Streets of Rage has been removed at Sega's request.

Developer Bomber Games has been working on the unofficial remake for over eight years. The freeware title was finally released last week, complete with over 100 new and remastered stages, 19 playable characters, 64 enemies (from all the Streets of Rage games), 83 remixed songs, over 40 cutscenes, and eight endings.

The remake also added a Survival Mode, Boss Rush Mode, Events Mode, Volleyball Mode, Allied CPU Mode, Profile Editor, Image Gallery, and more than 30 customizable options.

However, later in the week the download links were removed. It has now been revealed that the game was taken down after a request from Sega.

A Bomber Games forum moderator said, "SEGA have contacted regarding the download hosted on this site. While this issue is being resolved, please do not upload the game for others to download. Any links posted on this site will be removed. Thank you."

There is no word as of yet regarding the fate of the release.

[UPDATE: In a statement issued to Kotaku, a Sega Europe representative said the company "need[s] to protect our intellectual property rights and this may result in us requesting that our fans remove online imagery, videos or games in some instances."]


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Comments


A W
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So why don't people who can do this kind of stuff not just make their own original titles?

Kamruz Moslemi
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One has to wonder in case of these sort of fan remake efforts, why not just put that energy behind a original game of your own? Really seem like a waste of opportunity to me.

Billy Bissette
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There are several reasons. The most obvious is personal fandom. You like a game or series, and want to more. A second is a built-in audience. You take a series that has an established fan base and you'll get more attention. A third is assistance. Taking from other sources means that you don't have to do all the work.



But what I think the crippling factor for people who would want to make original games is is artwork.



Everyone has ideas. Most people can take a level design program and make a level, or a character design program and make a character. Coders are relatively easy to find, and there are free engine options that can reduce or even eliminate the need for coders. And all of the above can be learned at least to a passable degree through perseverance even if a person lacks natural talent in those areas.



That isn't true for art. Passable artists willing and capable to work on a large scale project for free are almost non-existent. Coders are a dime a dozen in comparison. And while you can manage with coding or design, no amount of perseverance will turn a naturally poor artist into a good one.



So you've got ideas. You can write scripts and use assistance tools. Maybe you can code, or can learn enough to do what you want, or maybe you just grab a free pre-built option. But it you can't do decent art, you are still pretty much out of luck. Maybe you can manage some gamer response with bad art, but it will be an uphill battle, and it is possible your bad art is bad enough to actually interfere with game design. On the other hand, if you make a fan remake, you've got a ready supply of professional game art to "borrow". Maybe you even have enough talent for some modifications, even if you aren't capable of making new from scratch.

Maurício Gomes
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Although I too agree people should make original stuff, I still think that SEGA is a frequent target of fans besting SEGA...



I mean, look at the lastest remakes of Sonic, all of them bashes Sonic 4 to oblivion for example...



I really hope SEGA hire that people, or buy the game from them and release it, or something like that, because they did a job much better than SEGA would ever do with their current internal studios. (how I miss old SEGA :( )

Andrew Traviss
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I don't agree with all of the criticism that is levelled at remakes. Taking an existing IP and expanding or refining it is a great way for an inexperienced designer to learn to handle the detailed design without having to answer many Big Design Questions. The original game design acts as a high-level guide in lieu of a senior designer.



Walking in the footsteps of a great designer can also give you a much better understanding of their decisions than any post-mortem or design document alone because you can directly observe what effect your own ideas have on the end result. Building something always grants you a deeper understanding of it than simply observing it.

Maurício Gomes
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But that does not apply for example to fanfic...



I mean, I see on a forum I moderage, bazillions of Naruto games... What for? Why not make your own fighting game with your own characters, why create a game from scratch based on Naruto?

Mega Zell
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Ever heard of a game called 'The Black Heart' - It's an excellent fighting game with unique characters, combos and story lines but only the truly hardcore freeware/indie gamers would know about it. You can get a lot more coverage by expanding on an established fan base. Billy Bissette did a great job covering the reasons and rhymes for fan made games.



So long as it's explicit stated that it's a fan based game and they are making no money from the endeavor companies should back off. Personal SEGA lost a fan in me when they made this move. This game has been around for a long time and the creators reached out to them a long time ago and now they respond with a ban hammer? If anything they just gave this game even more coverage and now pirates will be using this to cash in on it through various means.

A W
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I can agree to that Andrews... It's like when I research for a piece of art I want to create, whether it be fan related or not, I may research the original designs concepts to get the knowledge and better my own before producing the piece. I totally agree, but It just seems that major cooperations are overlooking the vast amount of talent that goes in to emulating. What will happen when a group of people just decide to ignore the SaD Letters? Tat seems not to happen often.



It just seems to me (having been the target of my own SaD letter) that the real problem comes from profiteering off of the work. Say said team had done this all for free, but they place in on some ad site which generates money for traffic. That when the SaD letters seem to mysteriously appear in the e-mail.

Joseph Amper
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But it's not really a mystery. I'm all for research but to take your art example, it's as if these guys (talented and dedicated as they are) made The Starry Night Remake and put it in a gallery.



Even if they were giving it out for free, the SoR name is probably what got people interested and visiting their site.

Andrew Traviss
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Weighing back in a bit late, but I don't think that a comparison to other art forms captures the full picture when it comes to game development, because what we build has a mechanical component to it. There's more value in imitation as a learning exercise because there are a much higher number of discreet decisions made in the creation process, both practical and creative.



Of course you are at the mercy of IP holders, but I don't think you should have to face the scorn of other game developers as well.

Ardney Carter
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At least they played it smart and released after it was finished instead of showing demos or screenshots in the middle of the process. Now it's out in the wild and it can't be taken back.

John Martins
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They didn't... SoR Remake has been available for download in various states of completion for years now. I played it so long ago I'd forgotten it existed until this news came up.

Ujn Hunter
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I'm sure it's out there somewhere...

Leandro Pezzente
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I can state as a fact that it is. You can call it Google Magic if you want to.

Luis Blondet
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SEGA is stupid.



Why not use that fan energy to their advantage? Hire them, legitimize the work, get your piece of the pie and it's done. It's that really so hard?



...so, so, stupid....

Rey Samonte
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Was asking the same thing. The work is already done.

Maurício Gomes
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If SEGA was smart they would not do what caused they lose the Dreamcast in first place.



Neither they would make stuff like... Sonic... on the Wii, with a sword... Or Sonic 4 that is worse than a fan remake of Sonic 2.



The only thing they did right recently was Bayonetta... and they did not actually developed it.

Leandro Pezzente
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I do think it actually is. While Art in games goes in a "More Quality" direction , Business in Games goes in a "Return Over Investment" opossite direction.

Ron Dippold
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'Piracy is a product of a market failure'. Here's another one, SEGA.

Brandon S
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Don't know... seems a bit hypocritical to complain about Originality from these guys in the comment above. The concept of being original for most professional in the gaming industry with legally published work goes as followed; creating one very generic IP derivative of COD or a bad action movies or ripping off tolken/star wars with countless sequels always with a white male protagonist on the advertisement



. In addition to having some faceless PR/hype guy to come out and talking about creative maturity of there brand new IP.



Not to mention both gamer consumer and publisher will burn anything that is somewhat different from what is being sold now .

Western Artist like the mythology /fantasy behind originality kinda like the fantasy behind a soul mate, rather than the reality of it . Fact of life people are drawn to familiarity and most thing are created from existing concepts and story , and professional developer are really not any more creative than these guys making there fan-remake . Professional can make a legal fan-remake off of existing IP and ride the well known name to instant profit . We call them " IP relicensing" "Sequels " and "Reboots" while the amateur cannot legally do the same thing for some dead game most people have forgotten.

Paul Orlemanski
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I know that this is going to sound controversial, but I look at Sega/Platinum Games similar to the Disney/Pixar syndrome a number of years back. Where the company that is the publisher/distributor is just a shell of their former self and the company under their wing is the real deal/innovator and is basiclly whats keeping the bigger company around in the media or in people's minds for that matter.

Leandro Pezzente
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Now , as I stated before in a previous post. Look at the amount of time this guys dedicated to developing this game " Developer Bomber Games has been working on the unofficial remake for over eight years.". Eight Years ... EIGHT Years . Now , I dont see any AAA game company dedicating that effort ( except probably Blizzard with Diablo 3 and Starcraft 2 ) and Energy into creating Art , designing levels , debugging code and implementing Engine features and funcionality into a game. They just preffer to get it all cooked and ready in 6 months along with their " Known - Shippable " Bugs and lack of good judgement and desition making process.

Jason Johnson
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Sega had enough embarrassment after getting schooled by Sonic Fan Remake. Can't let that happen again.

James Smith
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Hopefully all this attention Sega are drawing to the game will be enough for him to pay an artist/musician to do some new assets and then he just turn around and sell it instead! If the game has recieved as much love as it seems to have, I wouldn't mind paying for it.

Kevin Milner
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Games Workshop has the same sort of attitude with their fans. "You are only allowed to consume, no creativity on your part!". Yeah, ask their accountants how well that is working for them.

Josh Foreman
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I can't see how this could hurt SEGA. But I'm not a business/legal expert, so my perspective is limited. But from a fan perspective this looks bad. Really bad. SEGA comes off looking like dicks. Why not just take any financial losses and count that as advertising/publicity expense?


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