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Analysis: Price Premium On 3DTVs Coming Down Fast
Analysis: Price Premium On 3DTVs Coming Down Fast
June 30, 2011 | By Kyle Orland

June 30, 2011 | By Kyle Orland
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    5 comments
More: Console/PC, Business/Marketing



The high cost of TVs equipped to show content in stereoscopic 3D has so far limited the potential audience for 3D console games. But a new report suggests the price for such TVs is coming down fast, and may be just $150 more than comparable 2D TVs by the holiday season.

A price study by analysis firm Retrevo finds the cost of a 47" to 50" 3DTV currently averages roughly $400 more than a similar TV without 3D, down from a $900 premium this time a year ago.

At this rate of decline, 3DTVs could be only $150 to $200 more than their standard HDTV counterparts by November, when the holiday shopping season is set to pick up.

Steroscopic 3D support has been a focus for many game makers of late, with Sony in particular stressing the PS3's ability to render 3D scenes on compatible televisions.

Ubisoft marketing head Murray Pannel said last year he thinks 3DTV technology could "be installed in everyone's living room in three year's time," and said the company is positioning itself to be ready for that transition.

But Microsoft Game Studios corporate VP Phil Spencer said last October he felt stereoscopic 3D wasn't yet ready for the mass market, saying "its hard for me to see this as really being accessible.‭"

A recent study of British TV owners predicted that less than half of the 11 million homes equipped with a 3DTV in 2016 will actually use the feature, which requires bulky, battery-powered glasses to experience.

At last year's GDC Online, Interpret's Michael Cai presented survey data showing 69 percent of consumers considered 3DTV's cost-prohibitive, with 46 percent saying the glasses would prevent them from using the technology.


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Comments


Marcus Miller
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Is looking at 3D for hours and hours while gaming really good for your eyes? As an older gamer my eyes are getting bad enough aside from the fact 3D gives me a massive headache.

Amy Austin
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The only thing that 3DTV is good for is the fact that 3DTVs are actually better 2D HDTVs than "regular" HDTVs. This tells me that 1) the industry is realizing that 3DTV isn't the next big thing, after all (I could have told them this in 2009) and 2) despite this realization, TV manufacturers are STILL hell bent on forcing 3DTV down our collective throats.

jayvee inamac
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so its a case of having to drop prices because nobody's buying them?

Glenn Sturgeon
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No its a matter of the tech and components becomming cheaper so companies pass some of the savings off to customers in order to sell more TVs.

Paul Shirley
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At one point last year it began to look like it would be impossible to buy a high end set without 3D. That explained a lot of the 3D sales, to buyers with no intention of using it.



It's easy to believe the high incremental cost was inflated by that bias, partly because they could get away with higher margin, mostly because they really needed to use higher quality panels to make 3D work well. Buyers were really after the necessary 2D quality improvement needed to support 3D, not the 3D. The premium wasn't all for the 3D components.



I'd guess the price coming down will be driven by the general rising quality of panels. As good enough panels move downmarket we'll end up just paying the incremental cost of the actual 3D hardware.



And still probably won't use it ;)


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