Gamasutra: The Art & Business of Making Gamesspacer
View All     RSS
July 30, 2014
arrowPress Releases
July 30, 2014
PR Newswire
View All





If you enjoy reading this site, you might also want to check out these UBM Tech sites:


Nintendo Files Patent For 'Massively Single-Playing Online Game'
Nintendo Files Patent For 'Massively Single-Playing Online Game'
August 12, 2011 | By Tom Curtis

August 12, 2011 | By Tom Curtis
Comments
    22 comments
More:



While Nintendo has historically hesitated to fully embrace online connectivity with its games and hardware, a recently-published patent from the company outlines the concept of a "Massively Single-Playing Online Game."

The patent, first filed in early 2010, says that in this type of game, users playing a single player title could influence the characters and world of another user playing the same single player title, reports Gamespot.

Based on the patent's description, this concept hopes to capture the positive elements of online play without the need for human-to-human interaction: "Those who want to play games that are more dynamic, not-based on Al and not-pre-scripted like multiplayer games, however, don't want to 'deal' with other people, appreciate the privacy it provides," the patent says.

Elsewhere, the patent refers to the "a home video game system such as the Nintendo Wii 3D video game system," a seemingly different console than the company's previously announced Wii U system.

Despite Nintendo's patent, however, no other evidence suggests either the "Massively Single-Playing Online Game" or the "Wii 3D" will ever see an official release. Nintendo has previously filed a number of patents that never saw the light of day, such as a mood lighting system for the Wii and even a blow-up horse saddle.


Related Jobs

Nexon America, Inc.
Nexon America, Inc. — El Segundo , California, United States
[07.30.14]

Localization Coordinator
Firaxis Games
Firaxis Games — Sparks, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
[07.30.14]

Senior Visual Effects Artist
Gearbox Software
Gearbox Software — Plano, Texas, United States
[07.30.14]

Release Engineer
Turbine Inc.
Turbine Inc. — Needham, Massachusetts, United States
[07.30.14]

Software Engineer, Mobile










Comments


Matt Glanville
profile image
So Demon's Souls then?

Christopher Enderle
profile image
That's the first thing that sprang to my mind as well. I hope From has lawyers.

Kenneth Arcieri
profile image
My thoughts exactly too. How can you patent a game type?

David Eckelberry
profile image
Funny. I thought of WoW and every heavily instanced MMO.

Ben Sullivan
profile image
So many things wrong with this - not least of which is the fact it's patentable to begin with...

E Zachary Knight
profile image
Well, there is a difference between filing for a patent and something being patentable.



Anyone can file a patent on anything. It is up to the patent reviewer to decide if it can be granted.



I would hope that this is denied because as has already been pointed out, there is plenty of prior art.

Ian Uniacke
profile image
I don't think we can conclude there is prior incarnations without seeing the details of the patent. Perhaps there is a specific ingenious mechanic to the design that defines it.

Matt Robb
profile image
Didn't Spore do this as well?

Marc Audouy
profile image
Spore ?

Todd Boyd
profile image
This. Also, wasn't Little Big Planet single player, but you could push your content elsewhere?

Adam Bishop
profile image
I'm pretty sure Will Wright actually described Spore as a massively single player game, so Nintendo might have a smaaaaaaaaaall problem with prior art.

Jack Menhorn
profile image
Nintendo has also patented the "Sanity Meter" from Eternal Darkness. If that hadn't been patented there could be spiritual successors out there.

Todd Boyd
profile image
I'm pretty sure any game that lends itself to H.P. Lovecraft's universe has already used such a thing. There was a web game called "Cthulhu Nation" (that's probably still around) which used a Sanity Meter in its game-play.

Christopher Enderle
profile image
Doesn't Amnesia have a sanity meter of sorts?

Samuel Batista
profile image
Nintendo applying for a patent on a game concept... that doesn't feel right, not at all. Patenting software and ideas is pretty absurd if you ask me.

Jeffrey Crenshaw
profile image
There is an anti-software patent petition here: http://www.petitiononline.com/pasp01/petition.html. Anyone interested, feel free to sign it.

Jonathan Murphy
profile image
Wait, what? Silly Nintendo confusing me.

Carlos Sousa
profile image
I would wonder how that would relate to social games? I mean, from what I've seen, on many social games you play by yourself but you can influence the the game of other people I think. I'm not sure though, haven't played a single "social"game yet. But the bottom line is that I agree this is kind pretentious.

Christopher Enderle
profile image
Yes, you play by yourself but you can visit other people and do upkeep or give them stuff.

Tom Cadwell
profile image
Sounds like a defensive patent -- looking at the thread, lots of prior art is being cited...

Jacob Crane
profile image
I find this strange and somewhat scary. I guess, as a developer, it's scary to think ideas I implement could place myself within a legal nightmare. I feel patents like these hurt our industry as a whole.



When we start to be afraid of creating , and implementing ideas due to fear of possible legal ramifications. What would that mean the industry is coming too?

Michael Thornberg
profile image
It's impossible (In the US, South Korea and Australia) to write any kind of software today without tripping on someones software only "pathentic". I'd say it's a non-issue until you actually get sued. Besides, it's only in the listed countries where this sort of nonsense is legal to begin with. The rest of the world has a bit more common sense than to allow this sort of crap.


none
 
Comment: