Gamasutra: The Art & Business of Making Gamesspacer
View All     RSS
October 22, 2014
arrowPress Releases
October 22, 2014
PR Newswire
View All





If you enjoy reading this site, you might also want to check out these UBM Tech sites:


Nintendo Denies That Miyamoto Is Changing Roles
Nintendo Denies That Miyamoto Is Changing Roles
December 7, 2011 | By Kris Graft

December 7, 2011 | By Kris Graft
Comments
    26 comments
More: Console/PC, Design, Business/Marketing



[UPDATE: A spokesperson for Nintendo has now denied that Miyamoto is changing position at the company, stating that there has been "a misunderstanding."

"This is absolutely not true," the statement given to Reuters said. "There seems to have been a misunderstanding. He has said all along that he wants to train the younger generation. He has no intention of stepping down. Please do not be concerned." Nintendo shares had dropped 2 percent following the news.]

If there's one person who you could point to who has had the most influential hand in shaping the modern video game industry, that person very well could be Nintendo's Shigeru Miyamoto.

So when the 59-year-old game design icon makes any major career move, industry watchers are going to take notice.

On Wednesday, Wired.com reported that Miyamoto, the creator of iconic game franchises like Donkey Kong, The Legend of Zelda and Super Mario Bros. would be stepping down from his current position at the company, where he is head of Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development.

But don't fret too much -- he'll still be with Nintendo. He just wants to get his hands dirty again.

"Inside our office, I've been recently declaring, 'I'm going to retire, I'm going to retire,'" said Miyamoto via an interpreter. "I'm not saying that I'm going to retire from game development altogether. What I mean by retiring is, retiring from my current position."

"What I really want to do is be in the forefront of game development once again myself," he added. "Probably working on a smaller project with even younger developers. Or I might be interested in making something that I can make myself, by myself. Something really small."

Miyamoto said working to nurture young developers is important to the future of Nintendo -- he's going to have to go into full retirement sometime.

As a driving force behind Nintendo's games and hardware, even decades after he originally joined the company, the game designer has taken on a larger-than-life persona, making surprise appearances at game conventions with sword and shield in hand, and showing off new products in person, such as the successful Balance Board-based Wii Fit, a game he said was inspired by his weight scale at home.

"I'm interested in doing a variety of many other things," he told Wired, without divulging further details.


Related Jobs

Nexon America, Inc.
Nexon America, Inc. — El Segundo, California, United States
[10.22.14]

Localization Coordinator
Petroglyph Games
Petroglyph Games — Las Vegas, Nevada, United States
[10.22.14]

Producer
DeNA Studios Canada
DeNA Studios Canada — Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
[10.22.14]

Analytical Game Designer
Xsolla
Xsolla — Sherman Oaks, California, United States
[10.22.14]

Senior Business Development Manager










Comments


Andrew Ekeren
profile image
Looks like Miyamoto caught indie fever.

Christopher Enderle
profile image
It reminds me of Double Fine. They stepped away from big retail games and have had pretty good results. I would love to see Nintendo doing something similar, especially if the Wii U's online store is halfway decent at all.

xie shen
profile image
not sure if it is a good idea. i think it would be more important to believe and have faith in the current young developers who have been playing latest games and more aware of players thoughts. but i am curious as well to see what he will come up with.

Daniel Martinez
profile image
Japanese publishers have not been very aware of anyone's thoughts but their sharehoders' as of late. I think Miyamoto may be answering the call for a "hero" in Japan's video game market mentioned in another Gamasutra article published this fall (the title of which currently escapes my mind). As an avid fan of his work, I am rooting for him in earnest.

David Rodriguez
profile image
This man revolutionized gaming so if anything the main man himself is rolling up his sleeves to show people how it's done. I predict it being very much like how Keiji Inafune and a small team created Dead Rising with Inafune saying something like"during the time, Capcom had 600 people working on 4 games" while his small team, with little corporate influence created Capcoms next AAA franchise.



I almost say this is coming about from 3DS's slow reception and a questionable Wii U that's going to be released sometime. What better time then now to have corporate get out of his way so he can help revolutionize it's library once again without making Mario Kart 9:Luigi's Redemption.

Jan Kubiczek
profile image
app store ni kite kudasai! haha.

David Holmin
profile image
tondemonai!

David Holmin
profile image
How can't you love Nintendo for things like this? Here's hoping he makes some NES-like game(s) on Virtual Console.

Mark Venturelli
profile image
This is very exciting!

Maurício Gomes
profile image
Aaaaw... It was not true at all :( This is bad then.



It would be awesome to see Myamoto-San back in developer ranks, we probably would see new awesome franchises.

A W
profile image
Well it could have been worst...

Gil Salvado
profile image
the updates quintessential: "Nintendo shares had dropped 2 percent following the news."



capitalism just like i "love" it ...

Jeremy Alessi
profile image
I've wondered so many times what one of his games would be like if Miyamoto created it solo! This is really cool, someone get the man a copy of Unity stat!

A W
profile image
wasn't Unity suppose to be made for the GCN?

Bob Johnson
profile image
Lost in translation.

Olivier Besson
profile image
"Something very small".



What??? Shigeru creating a flash game? ;-)

Sean Currie
profile image
Flash is dead, yo. ;)

A W
profile image
@ Sean Tell that to the ICO Guy.

Harry Fields
profile image
I always felt their franchises suffered when Miyamoto-san stopped being the hands-on visionary and became more of an executive producer. Miyamoto going back to team level will be a wonderful thing for gamers.

Eric Geer
profile image
I think(even if it is or is not true) that Miyamoto stepping aside to do his own thing would be incredible and let the younger group start stepping up---Miyamoto isn't going to be around forever--they need to train some new masterminds for games--relying solely on 1 person is not good business practice..



No doubt he will be reviewing/commenting on games..but I think it's great if hes not the lead any more..I would like to see Nintendo continue to have a good track record when he has moved on--only way to do so is to train the new bunch of developers..Ninty has been relying on Miyamoto for so long it would be nice to see him create some smaller games just from his mind..while the new crew steps up under "some" supervision to get some more great Nintendo games out there for years to come.

A W
profile image
I agree very much with that, but he needs to do that with some of the western companies Nintendo is partnered with (owns) too; like N-space and RetroStudios. I still think Retro could be headed for greatness if Nintendo just let go a little and said OK develop 4 to 5 demos of games you would like to create and well help you turn the best of them into actual games. Sometimes I think Nintendo can be too conservative about creating new IP. I do understand the have a reputation to think about, but Mirmax and Touchstone pictures never hurt Disney's reputation.

Matthew Mouras
profile image
Miyamoto recently made several public statements about the benefit of developing on a small scale. He has talked at length about all that he learned from solo development and that too many game developers nowadays are too specialized... He's argued that we aren't creating the kinds of visionaries that made the medium what it is today.



I'd have to disagree with a part of that. There are a bunch of young visionary personalities out there now.



Still - I'm interested to see what, if anything, Miyamoto will create by himself or with a small team.

A W
profile image
I have to agree... when we see that it took a movie crew to make a game that has serious flaws in it, one has to think about why that happens more often than not.

Gil Salvado
profile image
@A W



The size of a team doesn't matter, and even it's expertise can't make up for a utopian game idea.

A skilled team and a focused vision can create games like Batman:Arkham Asylum - which isn't that kind of a big AAA title actually. It's intense, focused and polished. And Arkham City doesn't even try to reinvent the wheel, it's Asylum only 2/3 bigger with some nice new features.



We have a mayor problem in this industry, which is innovation can mostly be found at indie devs, but the money is made with AAA. We wouldn't think twice to go to the cinema if the new Pirates 4 ticket would sell for 60 bucks, and no one would even bother to think of watching King's Speech if the ticket would go under 3$.



I'm sure Miyamoto would make great games with smaller teams, but I doubt he'll be allowed to if Nintendo's stocks will drop due to some narrow minded investors.

Cordero W
profile image
I don't know about you guys, but this inspires me to make games even more. I feel like we're going to have a responsibility soon to do what Miyamoto has left behind. Even if he's not truly retiring, the fact that this news hits close to the heart makes me have to try to think of a world without Miyamoto.

Harry Fields
profile image
And that, good sir, is a world of great sadness. I owe that man and those who worked with him for so many happy childhood memories.


none
 
Comment: