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September 17, 2019
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Brian Rockwell's Blog

 

Stonegate Games is an independent game studio based in Seattle, WA. We are Brian and Amanda Rockwell, a husband and wife team who have been developing digital and tabletop games together since our university days in 2011. 

Player experience is the foundation of our designs. We believe that the best games deliver dynamics and strategy that go beyond rules and mechanics. The design fades into the background and the gameplay just feels natural. These are the kinds of games that stay with you—the kinds of experiences you want to relive over and over.

 

   NOTE: Blog entries awaiting initial Gamasutra approval.

Member Blogs

Posted by Brian Rockwell on Fri, 06 Sep 2019 10:27:00 EDT in Design, Indie, Smartphone/Tablet
Magicube began as a simple idea and nearly ended up as an unsolvable puzzle. I spent the bulk of development discovering all the ways it would fail as anything but a simple game.


Posted by Brian Rockwell on Tue, 07 Apr 2015 01:07:00 EDT in Design, Programming, Production, Console/PC, Serious, Indie, Social/Online
Responding to the call for blogs on MOBA, we will use the MDA framework to design a new MOBA.


Posted by Brian Rockwell on Mon, 20 Oct 2014 02:12:00 EDT in Design, Programming, Console/PC
Competitive play in all mediums engages players and spectators, but digital games are uniquely positioned to take advantage of randomness in a way with which physical games would be ill-equipped to replicate.



Brian Rockwell's Comments

Comment In: [Blog - 05/08/2017 - 11:46]

Really good write-up - you ...

Really good write-up - you could probably have spent a bit more time explaining what solving this problem does for the end user or what limitation this circumvents for added context, though my first thought was this is a lot of work that could be solved with sprite sheets with ...

Comment In: [News - 04/13/2016 - 04:00]

I haven 't played The ...

I haven 't played The Culling, but I have watched it streamed. It does some interesting things very well but from my limited viewpoint it hasn 't quite solved the between interactions problem yet i.e., player collision points are more interesting to experience and observe than the time between these ...

Comment In: [News - 12/30/2015 - 04:06]

Great post - I agree ...

Great post - I agree with many of the ideas in here. Twitch Plays Pokemon showed a demand for viewer interaction in streaming, even outside of the phenomenon being rooted in nostalgia. The game system described in the article is missing one thing that will push AAA to experiment with ...

Comment In: [Blog - 10/28/2014 - 02:14]

I 'd like to mention ...

I 'd like to mention that Ogre Battle 64 did account for this - there are three possible endings: Good, Bad, Worst. In the Worst ending you are deliberately removed from Palatinus after the war because everyone knows you are a brute and tool of war. r n r nGetting ...

Comment In: [Blog - 10/21/2014 - 02:00]

I like random elements in ...

I like random elements in games, but I waffle back and forth on how much value random map generation adds - while the possibilities are somewhat infinite, it takes a tremendous amount of work to make it feel polished. Depending on the kind of game you are making, it can ...

Comment In: [Blog - 10/20/2014 - 02:12]

Thank you for the feedback, ...

Thank you for the feedback, it is much appreciated I regularly keep up with Extra Credits, but I haven 't read Uncertainty in Games I 'll check it out. r n r nI think part of the problem was that I wanted to write an article about base principles in ...