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September 19, 2021
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David Hayward's Blog   Expert Blogs

 

I work for Mudlark, doing game design, teaching and event work, as well as conducting and writing up research projects. At the moment, in my spare time I also tinker with Arduinos, Systema, unicycles and mountain bikes.

 

Expert Blogs

Posted by David Hayward on Tue, 12 Oct 2010 11:29:00 EDT in Design
The addictive mechanics of Minecraft find a pleasant harmony with freeform multiplayer creation. If I were writing a genealogy of it, the two biggest things on it would be Farmville and Dwarf Fortress...


Posted by David Hayward on Fri, 14 May 2010 12:53:00 EDT in Business/Marketing
There’s been a bit of a furore this week instigated by EA planning to charge $10 for an online pass for their EA Sports titles. Looking past the nerdrage, I'd like to state a case as to why this is a good, unsurprising, and ultimately acceptable move.


Posted by David Hayward on Tue, 27 Apr 2010 10:00:00 EDT in Design
Summary: A lot of pervasive, game-like things are pretty boring. Games should be exceptional, not an extra layer of weaponised mundanity.


Posted by David Hayward on Mon, 15 Mar 2010 11:37:00 EDT in Design
Zynga is not a threat to traditional video game development, but it is most definitely a threat to developers' sense of identity.


Posted by David Hayward on Tue, 02 Mar 2010 12:40:00 EST in Design
Jesse Schell's DICE talk is doing the rounds. I've often thought about designing game rules into everything: what if a mundane job could be made compelling by game rules?


Posted by David Hayward on Sun, 28 Feb 2010 12:43:00 EST in Design
Virtual worlds aren't the escape we thought they'd be. While VWs were led by MUD and Ultima fans, the virtual world movement will end with a mass market, and interaction design will see to it that the most effective are those that tie to real lives.



David Hayward's Comments

Comment In: [Blog - 10/12/2010 - 11:29]

Three addenda I didn't want ...

Three addenda I didn't want to put in the post: ---- There's a bit of nostalgic gamer nerd in me that Minecraft fulfills too. Many years ago, before I even had dialup, I remember a very excited magazine article about a game made with voxels. At the time they were ...

Comment In: [Blog - 05/14/2010 - 12:53]

William, I'm not sure what ...

William, I'm not sure what you don't buy. Noone has claimed EA is making a yearly loss for one single reason not an EA spokesperson, nor any of the journos I've read, nor Andrew Oliver, nor me. Loss of revenue will be down to a very wide array of factors. ...

Comment In: [News - 05/10/2010 - 03:59]

That's the most tactless rofl ...

That's the most tactless rofl I've ever seen Robert. Sad to hear this is going on just down the road from our offices, and hope all the Rebellion guys find new things soon. Derby used to be a giant for the games industry, but just about everything except Eurocom and ...

Comment In: [Blog - 04/27/2010 - 10:00]

Thanks, all. Nathan, I have ...

Thanks, all. Nathan, I have come across Skinner boxes before, but was trying to stay away from the comparison as I've seen it quite a bit recently. It's fascinating and has a lot of substance for analysis, but I think the term is also at risk of becoming a default ...

Comment In: [Blog - 03/15/2010 - 11:37]

@craig: Disagree all you like ...

@craig: Disagree all you like they weren't contributions from Zynga, they were contributions from their users, channeled through Zynga, which they then happened to make a 1.2M arrangement fee or whatever from. Donating 100 of the subsequent campaign was laudable, but well, in general that's not something you could say ...