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May 25, 2019
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Neil Gower's Comments

Comment In: [Blog - 06/27/2009 - 01:24]

Hey Gabriel, great post About ...

Hey Gabriel, great post About the undo style of game design Prince of Persia, Braid, and friends , I think this approach is the extreme way of reducing the annoyance factor of difficult challenges. Super strictly timed jumps in a platformer are irritating if you have to go through a ...

Comment In: [Feature - 06/11/2009 - 06:05]

High quality downloadable remakes like ...

High quality downloadable remakes like SSF2THD and BC Rearmed are great, and show that a good game idea can be kept relevant with a fresh coat of paint every now and then. The only thing holding this sector of the industry back now is the business end. Case in point, ...

Comment In: [Blog - 06/04/2009 - 04:58]

Great post, you make some ...

Great post, you make some really good points. The distinction between documents for pitching and contractual obligations versus what's needed to actually make the game seems to be overlooked more often than not. The production documentation can be very fluid, maybe even better suited to a wiki or similar collaborative ...

Comment In: [Blog - 04/16/2009 - 06:27]

My 0.02: Of course it's ...

My 0.02: Of course it's good to pursue relevant education - computer science or art school or a game specific program. Besides that though, I think one of the best things you can do is produce some game content yourself. When someone is looking at your application, they need some ...

Comment In: [Blog - 04/15/2009 - 09:50]

I think you're right, while ...

I think you're right, while there are definitely hardcore and casual gamers , classifying games themselves as hardcore or casual is less cut-and-dry. The major distinction between hardcore and casual players is how much time and effort they're willing to dedicate to the game. I'd like to think that all ...

Comment In: [Blog - 04/14/2009 - 03:50]

I didn't agree with Sirlin ...

I didn't agree with Sirlin either when I first read Playing To Win. The way he describes scrubs strongly polarizes the discussion, since most casual players can see a little of themselves in his descriptions. As other commenters have noted, the thing to keep in mind is that his discussion ...

Comment In: [Blog - 04/06/2009 - 01:55]

Bob, you're right, it's not ...

Bob, you're right, it's not hard to do the install and it only has to happen once per user. Nonetheless, people perceive browser extensions as a hassle to set up and this deters them from trying out things that depend on those extensions. I listed the actual steps I went ...

Comment In: [Blog - 03/26/2009 - 05:50]

Hey Ted, thanks for checking ...

Hey Ted, thanks for checking out my blog. I think we agree that an adversarial relationship between programmers and artists is bad for the game, whether you're looking at shader performance as I am here, or other aspects of the game's quality. However, you go on to advocate having artists ...

Comment In: [Feature - 03/16/2009 - 02:10]

I thought this was a ...

I thought this was a valuable article because it did a good job of bridging the gap between artists and programmers re: shader creation. Having worked with various combinations of GUI based shade trees, property driven uber-shaders, and plain old shader code, I agree with the conclusion that node-based environments ...

[Previous Neil Gower Comments]