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November 16, 2019
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Nicholas Kinstler's Blog

 

I'm Nick Kinstler, and I'm a game designer, project manager, and director that specializes in card game design and virtual team management. Though I most often work in design and management, I've also contributed art, writing, and prototyping.

 

Member Blogs

Posted by Nicholas Kinstler on Mon, 23 Jul 2018 06:49:00 EDT in Design
So, is randomness a force of good or a force of evil? In this article, Nick Kinstler claims that it's neither...and both.


Posted by Nicholas Kinstler on Fri, 20 Jul 2018 11:11:00 EDT in Design, Production
With a card game set featuring anywhere from 80 to 200+ cards, documentation and organization is incredibly important. In this article, Nick Kinstler explains what a card file is and provides an outline of the card game development process.


Posted by Nicholas Kinstler on Mon, 16 Jul 2018 09:58:00 EDT in Design
Though we view our games as a single item, no two people see the same game. In this article, Nick Kinstler explains how players can perceive the same game in different ways and provides some insight on how to account for variations in perception.


Posted by Nicholas Kinstler on Sun, 08 Jul 2018 06:13:00 EDT in
Randomness is a key element in any card game and a hotly debated topic in the world of game design. In this article, Nick Kinstler discusses how different forms of and approaches to randomness can define the nature of a card game.


Posted by Nicholas Kinstler on Mon, 02 Jul 2018 12:19:00 EDT in
One of the ubiquitous design mechanisms of card games is the keyword. In this article, Nick Kinstler explains what a keyword is, what role they serve, and when you should use them.


Posted by Nicholas Kinstler on Thu, 28 Jun 2018 10:08:00 EDT in Design, Art
It's possible to make design decisions that turn players away, but it's also possible to make art and writing decisions that cause similarly negative reactions.



Nicholas Kinstler's Comments

Comment In: [Blog - 07/20/2018 - 11:11]

Hi Wendy, r n r ...

Hi Wendy, r n r nSharing knowledge and helping people are why I 'm here, so I 'm glad you found this article to be useful. Starting a new project is a really exciting thing, and I wish you and your team well

Comment In: [Blog - 06/22/2018 - 10:21]

I 'd like to point ...

I 'd like to point out that my example card, The Magimaster, has a horrendously overpowered second ability thanks to the way it 's worded. It should be something more like You may play a spell card from your discard pile once per turn. If you do, remove that card ...