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Can You Create A Must-Have Wii Game?
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Can You Create A Must-Have Wii Game?


March 9, 2009 Article Start Previous Page 2 of 3 Next
 

In fact, Seider claims that he chose his development team for the titles -- Big Bear Lake, CA-based FarSight Studios -- specifically because the 20-year-old company goes back to the old 8-bit console days and has experience creating arcade-like games, such as Pinball Hall of Fame.

"When I was doing my due diligence, they proved to me that they had a good understanding of how to attract the casual gamer," Seider added. "Not every developer knows how to do that."

As executive producer, Seider budgeted around his understanding of what the casual gamer would and would not accept.

"We could have made the graphics twice as good," he says, "and if we had been making an Xbox 360 or PlayStation 3 game then that would have been important since cutting-edge graphics and sound are clearly one of the selling points of their front-line titles."

"But if we had put a few extra really hardcore rendering pipeline engineers on the project, we might have had to charge more."

"Instead, we focused on our customers. In my mind, they are eight-year-old kids and their 40-year-old parents who are more concerned about getting good value for their dollar than photorealistic graphics."

He continues: "So we decided that we wanted the graphics to be good enough which enabled us to charge $19 for Game Party and $29 for Game Party 2."

"In fact, we have come to the decision that $29 is pretty much the highest you can go and still attract the casual gamer."

"Above that it's a very dangerous place to be -- people start comparing you to the other frontline games and clearly what we are creating is a very different type of game."

But while value for the customer's gaming dollar is important, says Seider, it's equally important for the game box art to shout that the game inside is no bargain-bin special.

"We don't spend a lot on advertising," he says. "So the product needs to have enough eye appeal that the consumer won't reject it just because it's cheaper than the other games on that shelf."

And because ad dollars are typically limited for value-priced Wii games, some of those interviewed believe that sales are more dependent on positive word-of-mouth than for other gaming platforms.

The customer needs to be able to load up the game, understand it immediately, and not be frustrated by the longer learning curves that are typical elsewhere. And then to tell their friends about it.


Article Start Previous Page 2 of 3 Next

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