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Gamasutra Versus Capcom: The Tatsunoko Interview
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Gamasutra Versus Capcom: The Tatsunoko Interview


November 9, 2009 Article Start Previous Page 3 of 3
 

In the West, it's very common when a company is launching a game is to make sure there's something on every platform. Even in the case where you can't make the same game for the Wii and PS3, for example, a game with the same title will come out. It will be different versions. You will see game ship on like seven platforms. But it seems like, in Japan, there's still a tendency to often make games for one platform. I was wondering if you have some insight on why it's more common in Japan and what the thinking is behind that?

RN: I guess you could say that when you put it on a system, you want to utilize the capabilities of each specific system, so if you put it out on the 360 or the PS3, you want to make it for those systems and utilize them to their full potential.

I don't know, maybe that's just something we do at Capcom. I don't know how other developers are thinking about it.

But if you take the Wii for example, we don't just want to put a game out on the Wii. We want to put out a game on the Wii that actually utilizes all the capabilities of the Wii.

Some games that are made for the Wii, they put them on the Xbox 360, change the texture maps, but it's generally basically the same. They just do some art cleanup. And at the face of it, I don't see any reason why that couldn't work for your game and also why that wouldn't be a good thing, but you may have a different opinion.

RN: Like you said, sure, that would be good for sales, but I like to think about the people who bought a Wii just to play a game like this. I want to take care of them, too.

I think, as I said previously, we've tried to exploit the Wii to its full potential for this game. Of course, that's just my opinion, but, I mean, Capcom might come down on me and say, "Hey, we want to make more money, so put on this," but that's on them.

To actually put this game, which I said utilizes the Wii's potential to its fullest capabilities, on, say, the 360, we'd really have to rework it. It wouldn't be a matter of just changing the texture maps or anything like that.

It involves so much time to actually rework the title that it would be a completely new title. And if we're going to spend that much time doing it, then we might as well just make a new title anyway.

Fair enough. I want to ask you about the way you chose the characters on the Capcom side. I'm sure you thought about the number of characters you'd like, then you sort of maybe chose them. How did you move forward and think about how that would become part of the game?

RN: One of the first themes for this game was we wanted to incorporate characters from different series when we made this game, so it wasn't just a fighting game, and it only had Street Fighter characters in it, for example.

We wanted to put a bunch of different characters in it, maybe supporting characters from past games, main characters from other games, non-fighting games if you will.

So, we get this list of characters, then we had to look at which characters had like similar attacks or similar looks. And if they were too similar and you couldn't really tell the difference between them, then we cut them out. And then we also want to keep a balance of like between male and female characters and also old and new characters.


Article Start Previous Page 3 of 3

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