Gamasutra: The Art & Business of Making Gamesspacer
View All     RSS
September 24, 2017
arrowPress Releases






If you enjoy reading this site, you might also want to check out these UBM Tech sites:


Valve to replace Steam Greenlight with a fee-based game submission system

Valve to replace Steam Greenlight with a fee-based game submission system

February 10, 2017 | By Alex Wawro




Less than five years after launching the service, Valve has decided to close down Steam's Greenlight platform and replace it with a more formalized process for developers to submit their games to Steam.

This is potentially a huge deal for developers because in the 4+ years since Valve debuted Greenlight, the number of games released on Steam every year has skyrocketed.

On the plus side, this has led to a game marketplace with remarkable diversity and scope -- visual novels and free-to-play shooters rub shoulders with interactive fiction and triple-A open-world games. But it also makes it much more challenging for devs to get their games noticed amid the crowd, and that's something Valve is hoping to address by replacing Steam Greenlight with a new system, Steam Direct, later this year.

The most important takeaway for devs is that Steam Direct is currently being conceived of as a system where you submit paperwork to Valve and then pay a fee every time you want to put a game on Steam. If your game sells, you recoup that fee; if not, no dice.

Today Valve published a blog post outlining how this change will work and why it thinks this is a good idea. The company sent around a copy in advance, and since the whole thing is worth reading if you're a developer who releases games on Steam, we've taken the liberty of republishing it below.

Evolving Steam

When we consider any new features or changes for Steam, our primary goal is to make customers happy. We measure that happiness by how well we are able to connect customers with great content. We’ve come to realize that in order to serve this goal we needed to move away from a small group of people here at Valve trying to predict which games would appeal to vastly different groups of customers.

Thus, over Steam’s 13-year history, we have gradually moved from a tightly curated store to a more direct distribution model. In the coming months, we are planning to take the next step in this process by removing the largest remaining obstacle to having a direct path, Greenlight. Our goal is to provide developers and publishers with a more direct publishing path and ultimately connect gamers with even more great content.

What we learned from Greenlight

After the launch of Steam Greenlight, we realized that it was a useful stepping stone for moving to a more direct distribution system, but it still left us short of that goal. Along the way, it helped us lower the barrier to publishing for many developers while delivering many great new games to Steam. There are now over 100 Greenlight titles that have made at least $1 Million each, and many of those would likely not have been published in the old, heavily curated Steam store. 

These unforeseen successes made it abundantly clear that there are many different audiences on Steam, each looking for a different experience. For example, we see some people that sink thousands of hours into one or two games, while others purchase dozens of titles each year and play portions of each. Some customers are really excited about 4X strategy games, while others just buy visual novels.

Greenlight also exposed two key problems we still needed to address: improving the entire pipeline for bringing new content to Steam and finding more ways to connect customers with the types of content they wanted.

To solve these problems a lot of work was done behind the scenes, where we overhauled the developer publishing tools in Steamworks to help developers get closer to their customers. Other work has been much more visible, such as the Discovery Updates and the introduction of features like user reviews, discovery queues, user tags, streamlined refunds, and Steam Curators.

These improvements have allowed more developers to publish their games and connect with relevant gamers on Steam. One of the clearest metrics is that the average time customers spend playing games on Steam has steadily increased since the first Discovery Update. Over the same time period, the average number of titles purchased on Steam by individual customers has doubled. Both of these data points suggest that we’re achieving our goal of helping users find more games that they enjoy playing. (You can read a more detailed analysis of our recent updates here.)

A better path for digital distribution

The next step in these improvements is to establish a new direct sign-up system for developers to put their games on Steam. This new path, which we’re calling “Steam Direct,” is targeted for Spring 2017 and will replace Steam Greenlight. We will ask new developers to complete a set of digital paperwork, personal or company verification, and tax documents similar to the process of applying for a bank account. Once set up, developers will pay a recoupable application fee for each new title they wish to distribute, which is intended to decrease the noise in the submission pipeline.

While we have invested heavily in our content pipeline and personalized store, we’re still debating the publishing fee for Steam Direct. We talked to several developers and studios about an appropriate fee, and they gave us a range of responses from as low as $100 to as high as $5,000. There are pros and cons at either end of the spectrum, so we’d like to gather more feedback before settling on a number.

Just the beginning

We want to make sure Steam is a welcoming environment for all developers who are serious about treating customers fairly and making quality gaming experiences. The updates we’ve made over the past few years have been paving the way for improvements to how new titles get on to Steam, and Steam Direct represents just one more step in our ongoing process of making Steam better.

We intend to keep iterating on Steam’s shopping experience, the content pipeline and everything in between.

As we prepare to make these changes, we welcome your feedback and input on this and any other Steam issues. As always, we'll continue to read the community's discussions throughout the Steam forums and the web at large, and we look forward to hearing your thoughts.



Related Jobs

Naughty Dog
Naughty Dog — Santa Monica, California, United States
[09.22.17]

Graphics Programmer (Game Team)
Insomniac Games
Insomniac Games — Burbank, California, United States
[09.22.17]

Mid/Sr UI Artist
Insomniac Games
Insomniac Games — Burbank, California, United States
[09.22.17]

Mid to Sr Gameplay Programmer
Insomniac Games
Insomniac Games — Durham, North Carolina, United States
[09.22.17]

Mid to Sr Gameplay Programmer









Loading Comments

loader image