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  Future Students Reveal The Need to Bridge the Gap Between Education and the Creative Industries
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01/11/2019
 


[This unedited press release is made available courtesy of Gamasutra and its partnership with notable game PR-related resource GamesPress.]

 

  • 71% of the future workforce aged 16-25 cite they have a desire to work in the Creative Industries, despite an absence of careers guidance
  • Stress for students is rising with 63% feeling pressured to select a career path to please parents
  • 43% of parents revealed they are more likely to pressure children into choosing ‘traditional’ career choices due to economic uncertainty
  • Art and design is losing popularity, as both parents and students rank it as the least important subject to study at school, despite showing an increased interest in creative careers

 

London, 11th January 2019: Ahead of the UCAS deadline, new research has revealed that 71% of the future workforce, aged 16-25, have a passionate desire to join the UK’s fastest growing industry - The Creative Industries. This sector is now worth a massive £101.5bn GVA to the UK economy, and with this growth one-fifth of all UK students are choosing to pursue roles in the industry over other sectors, according to the research, released by Escape Studios.

 

Despite this, 40% of students feel that they haven’t received enough information from teachers and careers advisors around the opportunities available to them within the creative industries - even though an estimated 1.2m creative workers are needed in the UK by 2022.

 

Confusion around the economic climate is creating extra pressure for students. 66% of 16-25 year olds surveyed revealed they believed their parents were more likely to push them into ‘traditional’ career options, such as accountancy and engineering, over a creative career path. In contrast to this sentiment, 43% of parents confirmed they would be more likely to steer their children towards more ‘traditional’ jobs, due to the economic uncertainty.

 

Parents seem to be one of the biggest barriers to entry into the industry, with over one-third of parents and guardians stating they would not be happy with their child pursuing a creative career - a 15% growth from research commissioned in 2018 - suggesting a growing lack of support and disconnect between parents and students.

 

Mainstream education fails to support creative talent within classrooms

Although there is a desire amongst students to pursue creative careers in Game Design (30%), VFX (21%) and Game Art (13%), our study reveals that support is lacking within the classroom. According to students aged 16-18 years old, one-third (33%) surveyed do not have a good understanding of the careers available in the creative industries, with 41% of 19-25 year olds agreeing they didn’t receive adequate careers advice.

 

The lack of advice and support offered in schools means one in three 16-18 year olds haven’t considered taking qualifications in the creative industries – despite employment within the industry itself predicated to grow by 5.3% over the next six years, double that of the average rate of employment, which will rise by 2.5%.

Escape Studios current student Maddison Gould comments; “Schools need to work harder when educating the future workforce about possible careers in the creative industries. The UK is brimming with talent; for example our art classes could hold a hub of future VFX designers. Teachers and career advisors should consider ‘less-traditional routes’ when offering information about employability in the creative industries, to ensure students who’re lost when choosing their options have a wealth of various career routes available.”

Parents are ‘out of touch’

Despite 35% of parents revealing they would not be happy if their child pursued a creative career, over a third of those surveyed stated they did not have a good understanding of the career options available within the creative industries. Showcasing a lack of support and education for parents around options for students in this booming industry.

 

Parents state that they would be happier if their children chose career options in industries such as Healthcare (14%), Engineering (14%) and IT (13%), even though the creative industries can offer many lucrative job opportunities.

 

A future Britain needs to become creative to succeed

Between 2010 and 2017, the creative industries grew by 53.1% and is predicted to continue growing despite economic uncertainty. In particular, the gaming sector now accounts for more than half of the UK’s entire entertainment market - more than video and music combined. Research from Escape Studios shows that a third (30%) of students would like to work in Game Design.

 

Despite all of this, students (30%) and parents (34%) still believe that Art and Design is one of the least important subjects they can take at school. Therefore, it’s imperative that schools better themselves in educating students, as it’s the future workforce who’ll help to build the continuously growing creative economy.

 

Dr Ian Palmer, Director of Escape Studios comments;“The creative industries continue to grow at a substantial rate; despite this, not enough students are aware of the opportunities available to them within the sector. However, we are thrilled to see that such a high percentage of UK students are showing an interest in creative careers. To support the continuing success of the UK's creative industries, we need to take a bottom-up approach to nurture future talent. We can do this by creating an environment to inform students and their parents of the career opportunities in the creative sector and provide more support for careers advisors.”

 

ENDS

 

For further press enquiries please contact Alfred London:

Email: [email protected]/Phone: +44 (0) 207 033 6566

 

Notes to Editors:

About Escape Studios

A university education, powered by industry experience and built by the best industry minds. Escape Studios are pioneering the next wave of visual effects artists, animators and game developers by transforming higher education. With industry engagement at its core, Escape Studios’ approach to industry-focused learning, is what sets it apart from the rest.

 

Escape Studios harnesses the expertise and relentless creativity of award-winning artists. Students are taught by well-connected industry experts that have worked on the likes of The Dark Knight, the Lion King and Harry Potter, plus games for multiple PlayStation titles; tapping into real insight built from years of experience in the creative industries. This is also harnessed through an industry-led Advisory Board, bringing together talent from the top studios in the sector, including Framestore, MPC, Cinesite, Double Negative, Dreamworks Animation and Sony Computer Entertainment Europe, to design, develop and deliver programmes.

Escape Studios’ thousands of alumni (dubbed ‘Escapees’) include BAFTA and Oscar winners; they’ve worked on VFX blockbusters like Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, The Jungle Book, Dr Strange, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, Captain America: Civil War, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Ex Machina, Interstellar and Gravity. They’ve also worked on bestselling games (Assassin’s Creed and Forza Horizon), award winning adverts, and some have even set-up their own studios.

About the research

Research was conducted by OnePoll on 500 parents and 500 child / young adults aged 16-25 between 4 – 8 January 2018.

 

Research was conducted by Censuswide on 500 parents and 500 child / young adults aged 16-25 between 7 – 10 January 2019.