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October 24, 2017
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Phil Maxey's Blog

 

I started with Flash way back in 2004, after gaining coding experience working on personal Atari ST/Amiga and PC projects. I worked until 2008 as a Flash designer/developer on various Flash projects for advertising agencies, creating games and banners for high profile campaigns. In March of 08 I decided to work full time on creating Flash games. That first year was pretty tough, but at the end of it I created a game which would change my life, that game was Christmas Crunch. Over the years that followed I created many games that were sponsored by various game portals (Mochigames, Armor etc). In 2012 I released my first 2 iOS games (created with Adobe AIR) Wordora and Balloodle. I'm currently working on a fantasy/strategy/async/MP game for iOS.

 

Member Blogs

Can we ever know the future? probably not but here's my take on what might happen in the games industry in 2016.


Posted by Phil Maxey on Mon, 07 Dec 2015 09:59:00 EST in Business/Marketing, Indie
Game discovery is a problem. It’s at the heart of why the “Indiepocalypse” was a real event. Despite all the seemingly easy access to large numbers of players, the reality is that access is now more limited than it’s ever been for indie game developers.


Posted by Phil Maxey on Fri, 25 Sep 2015 12:31:00 EDT in Business/Marketing, Production, Indie
Is the "Indiepocalpyse" real? or just the usual scare story put out by struggling indie game developers? Here's my 2 cents. If you're an indie game dev just starting out it might not be what you want to hear...


Posted by Phil Maxey on Thu, 26 Feb 2015 02:10:00 EST in Business/Marketing, Programming, Production, Indie
There are lots of choices we make as indie game developers that have lasting effects on our careers, from the platforms to the tools to the game genres we choose to spend time on. This post is about some of those choices.


Posted by Phil Maxey on Sun, 17 Nov 2013 08:06:00 EST in Business/Marketing, Programming, Production
This is a tale of when over ambition meets reality. I had an idea over a year ago to create a "big" iOS strategy/fantasy/multiplayer game. The following describes the end of the beginning.



Phil Maxey's Comments

Comment In: [News - 02/10/2017 - 01:03]

The App stores have proved ...

The App stores have proved that you need some kind of barrier to entry when it comes to submitting content. In an ideal world where people didn 't game the system that wouldn 't be needed, but it is needed. And if you can 't have the community curate the ...

Comment In: [Blog - 10/19/2016 - 10:02]

To me AAA means a ...

To me AAA means a game dev team having lots of money to spend on development AND marketing. And in that regards most of the top mobile games are indeed AAA, which is why mobile might have an easy onramp, but it 's a road that then turns into a ...

Comment In: [News - 10/20/2016 - 10:06]

This is exactly the type ...

This is exactly the type of machine I talked on this very website a good number of years ago. A true portable console with it 's own screen and you can plug it into the TV. So from that point of view, great. I just wonder if it 's 4 ...

Comment In: [News - 10/18/2016 - 04:46]

Great talk, which hits a ...

Great talk, which hits a lot of very pertinent points in regards to indie game development. I made indie games for a number of years, but stopped about a year ago to concentrate on writing, and that 's going pretty well. If I were to get back into indie game ...

Comment In: [Blog - 09/29/2016 - 10:06]

I think it 's fine ...

I think it 's fine to scale up on development if you can equally scale up on promotion. But spending years working on a game, without having the same equivalent or probably more amount of funds it took to do that, for promotion is a huge risk.

Comment In: [Blog - 09/15/2016 - 10:26]

Good article. r n r ...

Good article. r n r nThe game industry has got itself into a bit of a bind. What we have now is a He who has more advertising money, wins situation. Completely devoid of the game itself. So I agree with your point that the price of the game is ...