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Interview: Riccitiello Hates DRM, Respects Protesters, Tackles Controversies
Interview: Riccitiello Hates DRM, Respects Protesters, Tackles Controversies Exclusive
October 15, 2008 | By Leigh Alexander

October 15, 2008 | By Leigh Alexander
Comments
    32 comments
More: Console/PC, Exclusive



I personally hate DRM,” EA CEO John Riccitiello tells Gamasutra.

“I don’t like the whole concept; it can be a little bit cumbersome. But I don’t like locks on my door, and I don’t like to use keys in my car… I’d like to live in a world where there are no passports. Unfortunately, we don’t – and I think the vast majority of people voted with their wallets and went out and bought Spore.”

Earlier this year, it looked like EA was well on its way down the long, hard road back from being the core market’s most hated -- or at least, feared -- publisher.

The company’s E3 showing was practically inspiring, it surprised gamers with partnerships with renowned talent like Valve, id, Epic and Grasshopper Manufacture, its new re-commitment to quality was getting lots of buzz, and in some community circles, it had even begun to garner support for its bid to acquire Take-Two, which many analysts thought was quite likely to be a success.

But the two companies couldn’t work out a deal, analysts began to rumble about flat sales for Madden -- particularly on Wii -- an internet-wide backlash decimated Spore’s Amazon rating, and the company terminated previously-delayed Command & Conquer follow-up Tiberium, even prompting one analyst to raise concern about EA’s quality levels and management issues.

All this in just a few months – suddenly, it seems like hating on EA might not be out of fashion after all. So what does Riccitiello have to say?

“I think that, in general, a year and a half ago EA was pretty well hated -- and I think for good reasons," he says. "Today, you’d be hard pressed to go to a forum and not see a lot of people defending EA and its products.”

Riccitiello points to recent quality boosts for the company’s sports portfolio -- quantified by Metacritic -- along with fan enthusiasm for Dead Space and Mirror’s Edge and the successful launch of Warhammer Online, which he calls “a legit competitor with WoW."

“And whether or not they like the DRM, Spore’s a good game,” Riccitiello adds. “You could not come up with a list that long for any other company, and I think a lot of people are buying into that.”

And a small community initiative against Spore on the basis of its DRM is only one part of the story, Riccitiello says.

Spore and the DRM Story

“So far, Spore has outsold Sims 2,” he notes. “Commercially, it’s doing very well.”

“Everyone gets that we need some level of protection, or we’re going to be in business for free,” Riccitiello says. But he sees a lack of understanding among “a minority of people that orchestrated a great PR program. They picked the highest-profile game they could find,” he says. “I respect them for the success of their movement.”

“‘I'm guessing that half of them were pirates, and the other half were people caught up in something that they didn’t understand,” he says. “If I’d had a chance to have a conversation with them, they’d have gotten it.”

He notes that the company will soon be rolling out newly-announced relaxations on the account restrictions any day now, allowing users to deactivate one registered machine in order to activate another one.

“There are different ways to do DRM; the most successful is what WoW does. They just charge you by the month,” Riccitiello says, noting that the subscription model means that even those who pirate the software itself can’t play without paying.

“We’re going to see an evolution of these things. I wish we didn’t live in a world where we had to do these types of things. I want it to be seamless and easy – but I also don’t want to have a bonfire of money.”

Killing Tiberium

"If you want to put good food on the table and you’ve got chefs in the back, you give them better ingredients, better training -- and when you burn the omelet, you don’t serve it," says Riccitiello, discussing the recent cancellation of Electronic Arts Los Angeles' Command & Conquer franchise based shooter Tiberium.

Although one analyst pointed to the project cancellation as a cause for concern, Riccitiello disagrees. "This is a perfect example of EA investing in quality," he says.

"It’s a perverse notion – beyond perverse, bizarre, upside down, illogical, stupid to state that we’ve killed a project that wasn’t going to yield what we thought wasn't a high enough quality product as indicative of problems."

"When something's not meeting expectations... you can course correct by giving it more time, more money, changing the concept or killing the game. If you're committed to quality, you take one of those paths," Riccitiello adds. "If you preclude any one of those paths, quality will suffer."

"EA will kill a game or two a year. Forever."

Adds Riccitiello, "Any company that serves every dish that comes out of the oven whether it’s burned or not is not committed to quality... U2 made great albums, Steven Spielberg made great films. It doesn’t mean they don’t have their Tiberiums."

Going Head To Head With Zelnick

Some analysts -- both the professional and the armchair variety -- suggested that the battle between Riccitiello and Take-Two Board chairman Strauss Zelnick on Take-Two's value came down to an ego war.

"I've invested ego in a lot of things at EA," Riccitiello says. "In quality, in growth, in making it a place that people want to work, being able to embrace artists… I've invested zero ego in Take-Two."

Riccitiello, who often speaks highly of BioShock, says that while he has "a passion for a couple of products and teams at Take-Two on a personal level," notes that "I still get to play the games whether we own the company or not."

He says that there was a point in time during which the deal would have worked for EA, and when the period passed, the deal was no longer strategic for the company. "It didn't get us into new lines of business, or things that might ultimately have better legs toward the end of the cycle," he says.

And while Riccitiello says many in the media wanted to "impose their own personal narrative" on the dealings between Zelnick and himself, he says it was "surprisingly antiseptic."

"I don't remember ever getting angry, or any of that. Strauss and I remained civil... we honestly had a different point of view. He believed time was on his side... and we said we had a price and it was time-dependent."

Adds the CEO, "I don't get any more emotional about that than I do about my daughter's math homework -- which, actually, I occasionally get emotional about."


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Comments


Peter Olsted
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“Everyone gets that we need some level of protection, or we’re going to be in business for free,” Yes, but just do some simple serial code and maybe(!) a "DVD is required" thing, but DONT! do Spore kind of DRM! Why is Starcraft still played at LAN parties 1. Good game, 2. Doesn't require internet activation! You have good games, now stop doing that sickening kind of DRM. People will pirate the games anyway, but when why hurt legitimate customers as well? Just doesn't make sence. The average EA quality has indeed improved, and EA is more popular than before. But then why ruin your new and improved image with this DRM? Ridicules!



Please stop!

Anonymous
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“Everyone gets that we need some level of protection, or we’re going to be in business for free,” Riccitiello says. But he sees a lack of understanding among “a minority of people that orchestrated a great PR program. They picked the highest-profile game they could find,” he says. “I respect them for the success of their movement.”



“‘I'm guessing that half of them were pirates, and the other half were people caught up in something that they didn’t understand,” he says. “If I’d had a chance to have a conversation with them, they’d have gotten it.”



------------------------



Thanks for the lies about the DRM, John. Just two things:



1) Half of the people complaining were pirates. Really?. You know why I can tell you that's a lie?. Because pirates have no problem with the effing DRM. They play with a crack!.



2) We understand perfectly well, and we don't need a conversation with you if you are going to keep lying to our faces. What your DRM does is try to stop second hand sales, and you don't care if you have to inconvenience your customers to do it.



Sorry, John, is bad enough that you are punishing your customers. Trying to take the high ground is pathetic. And you are not getting my money until you dump all your DRM schemes.

Michael Lynn
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I think the head of EA should see games not as omlettes in a kitchen, but patients in a hospital. If somebody is sick, you do everything you can to fix them, not pull the plug. Why? You should be committed to seeing things through (and committed to the teams doing the projects). Throwing away a burnt omelette is a cavalier, pure business decision. Totally valid, but lacks an investment in your product. A company that cares about its employees and fans will have better overight to make sure the omelette doesn't burn in the first place, and if it does, it'll make a new one, rather than telling the customer "we burned it, here's some broccoli."



And DRM -- it's more like airport security than a lock on the car door. Only pirates care about it? Pirates care the least. Come up with a solution that doesn't punish legit buyers, and people won't mind.

Anonymous
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For PC products, I think you're going to see a lot more "internet connection always required" solutions. There may well be a day when we look back on current DRM solutions as the easy times.

Anonymous
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"I don't get any more emotional about that than I do about my daughter's math homework -- which, actually, I occasionally get emotional about."



I think you are just saying things because the deal didnt go through with take two. I'm sure you did get pissed when it things didnt pan out the way you wanted. Sure not pissed in the meetings but im sure this was somethnig you thought u could conquer.



"I've invested ego in a lot of things at EA," Riccitiello says. "In quality, in growth, in making it a place that people want to work, being able to embrace artists… I've invested zero ego in Take-Two."



I think EGO should be checked at the door, the majority of people in the industry dont want to work at EA, so you are fooling yourself with this comment! It just so happens that you guys own a lot of companies giving people a slim choice of removing themselves from your fold.

Anonymous
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"I think the head of EA should see games not as omlettes in a kitchen, but patients in a hospital. If somebody is sick, you do everything you can to fix them, not pull the plug."



I've worked on some crap projects and there are certainly points in development where a little more cash/TLC can 'revive' the game, but there comes a time when saving a game means rebuilding a lot of content/code from scratch and that usually costs a lot of money. Maybe EA made the right decision, who knows? We're simply not privy to enough information to make that judgment on them.



If one considers how many other games get canceled every year, one might stop to think about how odd it is that only EA gets flamed for it.

Aaron Eastburn
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"I think the vast majority of people voted with their wallets and went out and bought Spore.”



I think if they had offered a version with DRM and a version without THEN he could say whether or not people had voted with their wallet. As it stands all he can say is, “We didn’t lose as many sales as we thought we might.”. They still don’t have mine, and no, I haven’t pirated it either. However I AM considering boycotting all EA games if this is going to be his attitude.

Anonymous
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Hello I'm Anon1 from the controversial thread...



He is completly missing the point here. Cutting Tiberuim because it lacked quality GREAT! That's a great thing, however what your missing Mr. Riccitello is that your PROCESS and GAME MAKING CULTURE is completly broken.



It has been broken for many many years. With the large infuse of "CREATIVE PRODUCERS" a large miasma of non production developers have taken over your studios. These middle managers many of them without any specific development experience, from art to engineering are nothing more than couch gamers in very powerful positions.



That's the point Sir. Now if it took you guys FIVE years to get to this point of realization, then I would say, you're backwards, your process is backwards, its "STUPID" in your own words.



If you truly believe in your current process sir, take that SAME Tiberium team and give them a brand new IP to dev...hmm...do you think they'll be able to create something? I doubt it very highly.



Killing a project after FIVE years that no levels complete, after 40million spent is INDICATIVE of a problem! The fact that you are ignoring this is also INDICATIVE of a problem.



ITs like living a lifestyle of eating fast food, then you get cancer. You cut the cancer out. Now you say, "oh the cancer had nothing to do with eating fast food!" Now that's STUPID.



-ANON #1

Anonymous
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http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?story=20462#comme
nts

Sean Parton
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“I think that, in general, a year and a half ago EA was pretty well hated -- and I think for good reasons," he says. "Today, you’d be hard pressed to go to a forum and not see a lot of people defending EA and its products.”



*Looks at the comments for this news post*



Thank you for making my morning that much more jovial, John.

Craig Hamilton
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I still refuse to buy EA games, ever since they bought the rights to be the ONLY NFL licensed game. Make a better Madden? Why, when we can just buy our way out of competition...EA sucks just as much now as it ever has.



P.S. NO Pirated games, NOT a hacker, HATE Spore's DRM and won't buy it either. Nobody is naive or gullible enough to believe anything this guy says, regardless of the poor analogies he tries to use.

Michael Gehri
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"Riccitiello says. "In quality, in growth, in making it a place that people want to work, being able to embrace artists…"



All of the head hunter emails I get that want to get me into a EA studio, go straight to the trash!!!

Maurício Gomes
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John should be hired as a joker, no?

Aaron Lutz
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I wrote a response to DRM in the "other" article (the one hyperlinked above under "decimated Spore's Amazon rating), but I doubt it will be read, now, seeing as it's a month old. So, here it is again, in the new, and still relevant, article.



I've patiently read through all the rants and raves, rebuttals and counter-arguments, and various defendants' speeches for and against DRM. And I simply have to say that, for myself, I will not purchase a game that in any way hinders my personal ability to play the game on my computer or any computer I may wish to play my game on. DRM hinders my ability to play, whether now or in the future. I do not pirate games because often times they come with viruses, malware and various other destructive software. I'm not saying they are all bad, but I for one will not take the risk. So, to include DRM, limited installs, requiring the CD, or anything else that will hinder my enjoyment and playability of the game I legally purchase, will simply result in me not purchasing it.



I will not pretend to speak for the masses, here, but I believe that DRM does indeed prevent only legitimate buyers from playing the game unhindered; pirates are pirates because they will, sooner or later, hack whatever protective measures you have put in place to keep illegitimate copies of your game from being played, and distribute it to the masses. And I believe that, games that do not possess any form of DRM, and therefore do not generate negative user feedback regarding this feature, are the ones that will ultimately be the LEAST pirated games on the market. Why? Most normal people do not pirate games. And most normal people will not be driven to acquire pirated games UNLESS they have significant fears/reservations/negative reinforcement about what they will be expected to experience when they purchase a game. Personally, I don't feel like I want to ever have to call customer service to install a game - ever. Whether 3 installs or 30.



I do believe that a sound distribution/verification model is that employed by Steam and other similar companies. I recommend that the full game be playable on your computer with or without online access; if it is a multiplayer game, or can benefit from up/downloading content (such as Spore's Trade system), then when the player wish to experience these features, they send a verification to a server that checks its authenticity and then allows access. No limited installs; no disc required; no locks. It's like driving a car; having a fake license may work for the little things, like getting into bars. But when it comes to verifying the license with the police, or the Department of Motor Vehicles, it usually doesn't hold up.



So, that's my two cents. In my opinion, DRM is not the way to go; it only fuels piracy, and inconveniences legitimate buyers.

David Tarris
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Glad to see there are still people like Aaron left in this world who can voice their concerns without sounding like raving socialists and embarrassing this industry along the way. Some of you people seem so against a company like EA that it makes me wonder how you stomach working in this business at all.

Anonymous
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well every company isnt like EA... there is a spectrum just like in modeling see check it out: Runway----->Commercial Print----->Hustler. EA is our "Hustler" in the gaming industry because in most cases working there you have to be willing to go through almost everything, including bending over.

Cory McDonough
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The burnt omelette analogy is a decent one. I'm not going to argue that no project should ever be cut, and I also agree that some projects should receive extra effort if it's realized that they need it.



However one problem that the video game industry (and to a similar extent, the movie industry) has been having (in the eyes of me, a consumer) is the fact that games will be announced far in advance of when they should be.



It is very rare that a chef would bring out the omelette to show you before it's finished cooking - before he knows if it's burnt or not. In the game industry it's not uncommon to throw screenshots and videos at the public two to three years before a title is to be released.



Before you know if a project is going to make it or not, try keeping it "off the menu," so to speak. If not that, start working on the same menu item over again with lessons learned.



I'd love to play another good C&C FPS game, and I certainly wouldn't want to play a bad one - but now you've whet my appetite and I'm going to have to go to a different restaurant for my next meal.

Anonymous
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“I'm guessing that half of them were pirates, and the other half were people caught up in something that they didn’t understand”



I bought (yes, BOUGHT. With money.) Spore and I regretted it a little because of the SecuROM situation. After reading that comment, however, I hugely regret it now. I'm not bothering with any more EA products if their CEO thinks that all of the complaints about SecuROM are illegitimate.



It's not that all copyright protection is evil, it's just that the ones like SecuROM border on the ridiculous.

Cory McDonough
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Sorry for the double post. This is on the issue of DRM.



At first I had no strong opinions on DRM. I am against piracy, but didn't think one way or the other about DRM.



Now, however, after some consideration, I have realized that DRM is only guaranteed to effect legally paying customers. DRM to pirates is a small temporary setback. You're enforcing a permanent penalty on paying customers if only to slightly delay the thieves.



I sincerely doubt pirates are motivated to not pirate games because of DRM - to pirates DRM is a challenge - "try stealing this." On the other hand, I personally have avoided buying games with DRM.



People used to have their hands cut off for being caught stealing things such as fruit in a marketplace. DRM is like a system where paying customers are having the tips of their thumbs removed for legally purchasing the fruit, and thieves are not being punished because they can easily steal unnoticed and without injury if they're patient.



"They still don’t have mine, and no, I haven’t pirated it either. However I AM considering boycotting all EA games if this is going to be his attitude."



I've been on an EA boycott since prior to Battlefield 2 and have not pirated either. They have started to turn things around, but they're a long way from what I would expect from such a large company.



Noblesse oblige.



Be above the mire, EA. If anyone can afford it, you can. Your customers will love you and your opposition soon would too.



Spend your resources on coming up with a new, acceptable method of punishing the thieves without punishing the buyers - don't waste time and money on the current forms of DRM.



Once developed, this new DRM would certainly be worth a great amount of money to software publishers everywhere and would most definitely yield great financial returns in addition to securing your products.

Anonymous
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Am I the only person who's hoping this lying piece of dogshit gets hit by a bus?

John Barnstorm
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Considering how early Spore leaked onto the torrent sites, cracked, no, the pirates don't really care about DRM.



Could he be any more patronizing?



He makes it clear that he doesn't need the type of customer who cares about SecuROM, as the Wal-Mart purchasing crowd flocked to the game. He does have a point.



This interview was a mistake for him and for Gamasutra. For him, it generates bad blood among the strongest customer core. For Gamasutra, it paints them to be without a voice or editorial reaction.

Jamie Mann
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Big companies generally get held up to a higher "ethical" standard than smaller companies - Microsoft vs Apple being a prime example. As EA is the world's biggest games company, they need to be seen to be both maintaining high standards and blazing a trail for others to follow.



As with the adverts which are rammed down people's throats when they watch a DVD, DRM doesn't actually impact the people it's meant to target: instead, it complicates life for the people who actually paid for the media! Given that pirated media generally strips all the anti-piracy surround, it often offers a better experience.



There's also the nature of the DRM - it's one thing to block casual copying (which is already possible at the physical media level), but it's another thing entirely to tie a given item down to specific machines and a limited number of reinstallations: that just causes problems for legitimate consumers - especially as the timeline extends. Will people still be able to play Spore in ten years time? Fifteen? Twenty? I still play PSX and Saturn games (and C64/ZX Spectrum games!): will I be able to do that with activation-based DRM'd games?



EA's "relaxations" don't fix the underlying issue, they just pay lip service to the concept of consumers doing as they please with legally bought media. It's another step towards the rental model (and the death of the secondhand market): time will tell if this will have the effect the big companies want (increased revenue) or whether killing off the existing ecosystems will starve the golden goose...



Regarding the cancellation of Tiberium: I don't really see the issue. People can't lambast EA's quality control and then turn around when EA actually applies some metrics to a failing project and cancels it. If the cost of fixing the problems (or starting again) exceeds the projected revenues, it's time to cut losses and try something else.

Jamie Mann
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@Cory



The analogy of a burnt omlette is a bad one: it's a low-cost, mass produced item. The Chef doesn't need to bring it to your table partway through cooking: you know what to expect.



A better analogy would be of a street full of restaurants which all cook omlettes and are all trying to attract your attention with free samples. "Here: we add garlic!" "No, here: try this one with organic eggs!" The pre-cooked samples may not be representative of what will be delivered to your table - especially if the restaurant runs out of a given ingredient.



Games are generally (on paper at least) high-cost and unique items, and there's a very real need to maximise revenues and promote the uniqueness over and above all the other items being released at the same time.



This is why game promotion starts so early - even if the art assets, game design or underlying technology are higly likely to change. Duke Nukem Forever being an obvious example...



It's not a good situation - overly grandiose claims, carefully managed presentations and channel manipulation (no more free gaming swag if you write something negative!) mean that the entire process is flawed. But it's understandable.

Mark Kollasch
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I hope he reads at least some of these comments.



I did not buy Spore because I do not want SecuROM on my computer. I did not pirate Spore because I don't support piracy.



DRM did not stop one single pirate from playing Spore. Not one. It did stop plenty of honest would-be customers, like me, from playing it.



Why do they persist with this obviously broken model? Is there somebody in the chain of command who's clueless? Do investors cry for blood if they hear that there are no "anti-piracy" measures, and only totally counterproductive ones can assuage them? Is it some outlandish conspiracy, attempting to force players to buy multiple copies of the game, or to sabotage the platform, or implant mind-control bugs and go back in time with aliens to abduct JFK?



What I can't possibly understand is how anybody benefits from this except the designers of DRM.

Yannick Boucher
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I think Gamasutra is really putting oil on the EA fire here... and Riccitiello shooting off his mouth as usual is definitely not gonna help !! Then again, some things clearly have to be said and put under the spotlight at this point, EA is a broken company.

Yannick Boucher
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About DRM, I'm gonna have to quote what the latest GI.Biz editorial says, which is right on the point :



"Admittedly, Riccitiello's comments go a lot deeper than that convenient headline. Despite the fact that he "hates" DRM, he goes on to attempt to justify it - comparing it with locks on your door or other necessary evils which we all require for security.



The comparison is utterly flawed. Locks and keys are indeed a trade-off which we make between convenience and security, but they are designed to protect our own security - not that of the company that sold us the door. There is a real, tangible advantage to the person being inconvenienced. That doesn't exist with DRM. "



End of Story.

Craig Dolphin
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So John Riccitiello not only insults his unhappy former customers by calling half of them criminals and the other half ignorant, he then claims to want to have an opporunity to talk with them about the issues.



Never mind the open invitations that have previously existed for him to do exactly that over the past few months.



So, those self same gamers have now made this invitation very clear and personal for John. The gamers at www.ReclaimYourGame.com have emailed John Riccitiello and invited him to come talk with us. So, if he was being upfront, he'll show up and put up.



Otherwise he reveals himself as a craven jerk who ought to be replaced by his shareholders for driving EA stocks into the ground at twice the rate of decline of tech stocks over the same period, twice as fast as 2K's stocks have declined, while Activision Blizzard have gone up by nearly double over the same interval.



C'mon John. It's time for you to face up to your customers directly. Quit hiding behind journalists.

I Already
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"Today, you’d be hard pressed to go to a forum and not see a lot of people defending EA and its products.”



EXCEPT FOR THE SPORE FORUMS, for a start :).



Yeesh. What a dumb thing to say. He needs a new PR person.



At this point, set against the large number of good staff who've been running screaming from EA all year and claiming Riccitiello's talk has been exactly that - talk - and idiotic BS like this interview I'm finally 100% convinced that he's a fast-talking liar who has little intention of actually reforming EA, but plenty of intentioning of marketing the hell out of pretending to reform it, no matter how often and how thoroughlyl the facts belie his patter.

Rik Spruitenburg
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"But I don’t like locks on my door, and I don’t like to use keys in my car."



This is an invalid comparison.

1) The automaker put the locks in to protect me, the end user. As the user, I can just duct-tape in the keys if I want, or leave them under the floormats.

2) The automaker does not view each stolen car as a lost sale. Why would they?

3) Locks on cars make it a lot hard to steal cars and do not make it harder to drive cars. The so-called protections for Spore do not make it at all harder to steal but use up processing power and disk space of the intended end user even when not playing the game.



"There are different ways to do DRM; the most successful is what WoW does. They just charge you by the month"



Again, that's not logical. Did you hear the implied threat? "you are just glad we didn't tack a monthly fee onto Spore." Guild Wars doesn't charge monthly, and they also have the same protection that World of Warcraft does: They have accounts, and without an account you can't do much. To get an account, you need a CD Key, and to get a CD Key you need to buy the game. It's too bad Spore didn't have online account that required the use of a CD key. Oh, wait. It did. You had the power to use exactly this system and you took it. So you had a CD Key to keep people from accidentally stealing the game by loaning the game out and you had online accounts to keep people from getting all the features without an account. But that wasn't good enough, you had to put what amounts to spyware on my computer just to ... actually, I don't know what you hoped to gain by that, not enough to pay for the spyware or the bad press.

Marco Biechl
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You know i waited for months, if not years, to be able to buy Spore. The idea, the technology, it all amazed me. Finally a fresh idea on the market. But the DRM stuff spoiled it all to me. Simply the truth.

Under no circumstance i will ever buy a game that has that kind of "protection". You at EA and elsewhere know that it does not help a thing, you can get a ripped copy _anytime_ without that DRM stuff within a day or two, or even before release. If you don't know that, i ask myself where you've been around the last 20+ years.



But instead of realizing it and stop spitting your loyal customers in the face, you make it worse each time. What kind of DRM is upcoming next? I'm sure you'll finde even more creative ways to "protect" your games and scare off even more of the customers that once happily bought a lot of games from your company.



But of course we're all pirates or even stupid and don't get the cool and fanzy DRM thingy. Please enlighten us all, oh you mighty CEO, sent from heaven above. ;p



As you probably know by now, i'm really pi**ed because you at EA totally ruined the game for me, i was awaiting for so long. And NO, i don't have a pirated version, nor will i ever buy Spore - even if you give it to me for free, i don't want it anymore!



Of course it's not an EA specific problem only, Mass Effect for instance had a sick DRM as well, but i'm not commenting on MS here.

Both are very good games and were totaly ruined by DRM's which are senseless when it comes to copy protection. Get it, there will never be a working copy protection and if you don't making it worse each time and don't stop scaring off all of the customers that are _willing to buy_ your games, you should stop your business right now! You're doing just the same thing as the music industry and if you open your eyes a little bit you can see, where it lead them to. Please stop doing the same mistake!



To sum it all up:

You're trying to convert pirates into buyers, but instead all you do in fact is to convert once loyal buyers into pirates or non-buyers - you already converted me to the latter.



Seriously, think about it before it's too late, please.

flv converter for mac
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I don't get any more emotional about that than I do about my daughter's math homework -- which, actually, I occasionally get emotional about.

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Otherwise he reveals himself as a craven jerk who ought to be replaced by his shareholders for driving EA stocks into the ground at twice the rate of decline of tech stocks over the same period, twice as fast as 2K's stocks have declined, while Activision Blizzard have gone up by nearly double over the same interval.


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