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Apple not interested in 'traditional gaming' says CEO Tim Cook
Apple not interested in 'traditional gaming' says CEO Tim Cook
May 30, 2012 | By Mike Rose

May 30, 2012 | By Mike Rose
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    7 comments
More: Smartphone/Tablet, Business/Marketing



Apple is not interested in getting involved with what is perceived as "traditional gaming," CEO Tim Cook said this week.

Speaking at the D10 conference, and as reported by All Things Digital, Cook explained that games have evolved past big-screen console gaming, and Apple is not interested in exploring that particular area of the market.

"I view that we are in gaming now in a fairly big way," he said. "Gaming has kind of evolved a bit. More people play on portable devices. Where we might go in the future, we'll see. Customers love games."

However, he added, "I'm not interested in being in the console business in what is thought of as traditional gaming. But Apple is a big player today, and things in the future will only make that bigger."

When asked whether Apple intends to focus on games on TV, he responded, "I think it could be interesting."


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Comments


Nathan Mates
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Apple has always seemed to have a reaction to gaming that varies between neglect and outright disgust. Starting with ProDOS on the Apple /// and Apple ][ series, and especially on the early Macintosh line, Apple had an outright attitude of "we're making serious machines for serious people, and gaming is beneath us." Those that tried making games for Macs had some success, but Apple would tease out a useful API (sprockets, anyone?) they'd knife that in the back soon later.

Lately, Apple seems to be in their best mood about gaming, actually working with Steam to get ports for the mac, and seeing that games on iOS are profitable. Maybe that's because they've finally dropped that "we're trying to be serious" attitude. Or the "we're for creative types" attitude. Part of that might be the iPod proving that it's a whole lot more profitable to cater to people who want to consume media rather than the "serious" (1980s) or "creative" (1990s) mentality. However, given their past history, I'd recommend that those trying to make games for Apple products enjoy Apple's current good mood and always watch out for the knife in the back that has happened so many times before.

Disclaimer: the last Apple product I owned was an Apple IIgs, which I consider the last Apple machine made in the spirit of Steve. Wozniak, that is. I've not appreciated the Macintosh line or the used car salesman that the other Steve is.

Nicholas MacDonald
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Okay, is it just me or did he basically say "no to console games" followed by "games on TV could be interesting". If Apple starts aiming itself towards gaming experiences on a television, they will immediately be moving more towards the console gaming space. It might be a different experience thanks to Airplay and whatnot, but ultimately, it's still you on a couch, staring at a TV, playing a video game. The game market is changing drastically, but it's not transforming into a strictly mobile affair.

I'm thankful Apple isn't yet trying to move into the console space because they have no experience as a game company. They have an excellent platform for apps, and many developers have leveraged that to their own benefit, but the target audience for mobile gaming wouldn't likely be excited by the prospect of iOS on the big screen. For that reason it will probably be several years yet before Apple even moves an inch towards console/PC gaming.

Joe McGinn
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Yup that's exactly what he said Nicholas. So, he didn't actually say anything about gaming at all.

John Trauger
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It's not *too* surprising. If I read apple rightly, Mac OS is considered legacy and the company focus is iOS. "mainstream" games aren't where that platform is at.

Cook is probably more interested in plugging into the social game scene. It's a good fit for Apple and a potentially lucrative one as well. While he isn't saying what sort of games he *is* interested in supporting, I can't really see him thinking anywhere else.

Joe McGinn
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And yet he says they could focus on games on the TV. Which is, for all practical purposes, the area he claims not to be interested in. Overall incredibly confusing interview, I don't know anything more about Apple's approach to gaming than I did before I read it.

Jonathan Murphy
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Interview Summary: No to games, yes to games, remain vague. Did Tim Cook just troll us?

Ken Nakai
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The sort of broad attempts by Apple and Microsoft (just to compete) to migrate desktops to a mobile OS scares me. All I can see is a future of big fat buttons and little control over the OS as a "power" user. Want to scripting or use something we don't like (like Flash)? Tough. Lowest common denominator will always win...


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