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Nintendo discusses plans for smartphones, helping the Wii U rebound
Nintendo discusses plans for smartphones, helping the Wii U rebound
January 29, 2014 | By Christian Nutt




Today in Tokyo, Nintendo held its first shareholder briefing following its disappointing third quarter results, which showed poor Wii U sales.

President Satoru Iwata took the stage to address a packed room, according to live reports from the Wall Street Journal and Macquarie senior research analyst David Gibson, who livetweeted the event.

Iwata told the crowd that Nintendo has no plans to abandon its home console business, according to the Journal, and instead intends to refocus efforts on making the Wii U more appealing to consumers via its games, marketing, and improved responsiveness via firmware updates.

"The Wii U GamePad needs titles to take advantage of pad, [this] is [the] company's highest priority," Gibson tweeted. He reported that Iwata wants to see the profile of the touchscreen Wii U GamePad increased -- consumers believe that it's an accessory for the Wii.

The company also has plans to introduce an NFC title for the pad. Disney Infinity and Skylanders use this technology, which is also built into the GamePad. Nintendo has so far dabbled in it with downloadable game Pokemon Rumble U.

According to Gibson's tweets, Iwata said that a Wii U price cut is not an option for the company.

The company also announced the addition of the original DS to its Virtual Console service for the Wii U.

Nintendo's plans for smartphones, while its console business continues

Iwata denied that the company would make either full games or demos for smartphones but instead use the devices to drive interest in its own consoles. "It doesn't make sense for us not to do business in smart devices, [we] want to establish connections to users to drive to own devices," Gibson tweeted, paraphrasing Iwata.

"Short answer, he’s not going to release Nintendo’s titles on other platforms," the Wall Street Journal's liveblogger Kana Inagaki wrote.

[Update: In a transcribed version of Iwata's results briefing, the president expands on Nintendo's smartphone plans, explaining that, the company has assembled a "small, select team of developers" to explore opportunities on mobile to help create "stronger ties" with customers. That doesn't necessarily mean Nintendo mobile games, but it doesn't rule it out, either.

He says, "In the current environment surrounding smart devices, we feel that we will not be able to gain the support of many consumers unless we are able to provide something truly valuable that is unique to Nintendo."

He adds, "Accordingly, I have not given any restrictions to the development team, even not ruling out the possibility of making games or using our game characters. However, if you report that we will release Mario on smart devices, it would be a completely misleading statement. It is our intention to release some application on smart devices this year that is capable of attracting consumer attention and communicating the value of our entertainment offerings, so I would encourage you to see how our approach yields results."]

Nintendo's future hardware plans seem to revolve around convergence between its handheld and console devices, according to Iwata's comments, in the manner of smartphones and tablets. "Apple has one iOS platform as does Android, Nintendo has to do the same," Gibson tweeted.

Though handhelds and consoles were very divergent in the past, "Mr. Iwata says... technological advances have narrowed the architectural difference between the two," Inagaki wrote. "He adds he doesn’t know yet whether the two hardware will be merged in the future, but the two will become more like 'brothers.'"

Nintendo merged its console and handheld divisions almost a year ago.

Instead, as expected, Nintendo hopes to get people to sign up for Nintendo Network IDs on smartphones and interact with the company that way. According to Gibson, Iwata said NNIDs, which are already used on the Wii U and 3DS, will be used in its future handheld and console devices -- confirming the company has no plans to give up its core hardware business.

Instead, it plans to create new services based around the Nintendo Network to build network-based, not device-based, relationships with its customers, Gibson wrote. This service will not be designed to make a profit, but "advertising is not enough, it needs to be fun and engaging."

Nintendo may have no plans to go third-party, but according to the Wall Street Journal, Iwata mentioned plans to license its characters to new partners -- to "expand exposure," per Gibson. However, if this will undermine its own titles, Nintendo will not sign a deal. The company is already in talks with partners to do so, Iwata said.

Sailing Back to the Blue Ocean

The company found great success with the original Nintendo DS and the Wii by targeting a consumer base which had not approached video games before -- and Iwata said at the meeting that over the next 10 years, the company hopes to find more success by creating a health-based business.

The goal is "enhancing the quality of life through entertainment," wrote Inagaki, by creating what Gibson called a "quality of life platform" that will "propose [a] healthy structure for day-to-day" life via non-wearable devices -- though the company wouldn't explain what "non-wearable devices" are. Iwata expects "synergies between games platform and QOL platform," tweeted Gibson.

Nintendo's game design guru Shigeru Miyamoto promised that the company is building a "flagship title" to demonstrate the power of its quality of life platform, Gibson wrote.

Further details about these devices will be revealed later in the year, Iwata said. The quality of life platform will roll out in April 2015, Gibson wrote.

Looking Ahead

Over the next fiscal year, which begins this April, the 3DS "will be the driver" of Nintendo's business, wrote Gibson. The Wii U "will not provide big profit but software titles will drive restoration," he tweeted.

Iwata has "never considered quitting," reports the Wall Street Journal, though he has taken a pay cut as an admission of responsibility for the company's poor performance.

While the transition to the HD Wii U was rough for Nintendo, the Wall Street Journal's Inagaki wrote that Miyamoto promised that "there’s been an internal improvement in conditions for creating new titles."

Iwata expects increased interest in the Nintendo 3DS from global development teams thanks to its large install base, and as the Wii U rebounds, "third party will follow," per Gibson.


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Comments


Josh Charles
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Glad they're committing themselves to focusing on their existing hardware rather than going into mobile.

I'm most curious as to how the DS virtual console on the Wii-U will work. Specifically I'd like to know just how many DS games will be available from the start and how many will be available per week. Pricing is also a huge question mark. And will all of this happen after they update the Wii-U to tie eShop purchases to an account rather than the system?

Bob Johnson
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Titles will cost more than you think, rollout will be slower than you want and it will start before they untie eShop purchases to hardware.

Josh Charles
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You're probably right Bob but I guess we'll just have to wait and see when Nintendo feels like explaining more of this in detail.

Curtis Turner - IceIYIaN
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The ability to play cell and handheld games is probably the main reason they don't want to un-force the Wii U gamepad. With 100++ million people playing these types of games, it can lead to a worthwhile venture. Like many have said though, the added $100 to the device is perhaps a little too expensive for most people.

Nintendo doesn't get a lot of credit for the virtual console. It's probably one of the main reasons Wii has such a massive userbase.

Josh Charles
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You're right Curtis, I do think Nintendo deserves credit for simply having the virtual console. But I think we need to also be cautious in giving them too much credit here because the current virtual console is just a fraction of what its potential is.

It's 2014 and we have not 1 not 2 but 3 separate virtual console platforms - the Wii, Wii-U, and 3DS. None of them talk to each other and they each have different games, some of which overlap. None of the individual platforms on the virtual consoles (NES or SNES for example) offer anywhere close to the full catalog of games that were released on the original hardware. On the current gen hardware (Wii-U and 3DS), not even most first-party titles from the NES, SNES, N64 era are even available. That is just mind-boggling.

I don't know how they programmed their virtual consoles but I would have thought that they would take a cue from the numerous emulators across the internet that already run their games and design one emulator that's compatible to all current and future hardware that doesn't involve needing to modify the original code for each game. The emulator should be able to read the code for each game, know which hardware its running on, and display that game appropriate. As it stands now, it seems that they are manually modifying the code for every game per system which could explain why it's taking so long to bring games onto each system.

A W
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@Josh You right that is what they are doing. when you DL a Rom on the Wii, Wii U ,or 3DS you are DL a modded emulator tailored to the use of that game. This may be because A) the hardware architecture is different between consoles and handhelds, and B) the games they are offering where cart based which allowed software manufacturers (including Nintendo themselves) to hard mod the hardware in the cart to do things the system itself was not capable of doing (think Starfox on the SNES and the FX chip that allowed mode seven graphics to be mapped to polygonal forms.) Some of the best emulator on PC still can't run every game in the SNES or NES catalog completely well and it my be do to some of the hard modding of sounds chips or graphic chips that cause them not to display or act properly when being run by the emulator. So Nintendo is doing the VC network in a archaic way yes, but it is because that's the only way you get the optimal performance from each game being emulated with out the excess of blotted unneeded emulator code.

Sony doesn't worry about this kind of thing because all of their gens started on on disc which didn't allow programers to hard mod a chip. Everything had to be done by hardware specifications. All they need is the raw program and one emulator to run the system. That is why the cloud is a good option for them.

Eric Harris
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@A W
You make a very good point.

Benjamin Quintero
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"there’s been an internal improvement in conditions for creating new titles." what does that even mean?!? I tried to think of an even more vague response and my nose started bleeding from the strain... That had to have been crafted from a business buzzword generator.

So in short, they aren't turning this ship in any direction; steady as she goes Captain. From what I've gathered, "we are targeting fat people.. because they'll buy anything." Nice...

I can't say I'm all that surprised. Fitness stuff was some of their largest sellers. They seem hellbent on getting the Wii crowd back. It's hard to say that they will return, but my bet is on NO. I don't know how I feel about this... I just wanted some fun games on an affordable console. WiiU could have been that; now it's being pitched as a heart monitor. (insert flat-line joke here)

At least they realized that there is a chance to create a unified Nintendo ecosystem instead of a buckshot of hardware devices that don't talk to each other. baby steps...

"non-wearable" is getting overplayed here I think. He's probably talking about something like using Pokenmon pocket monster that you toss in your pocket to count your steps and track your calories. Whatever this QOL platform is, it's probably an App that let's you upload stats to your NNID and track your progress WiiFit style. All good and well - has nothing to do with playing video games. The bigger question here; is Nintendo getting out of the games business??

Christian Nutt
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What it means is that they had a difficult time transitioning from SD to HD games, just like everybody else did, but years later. But within a year they've sorted it out.

Eric Harris
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Sounds like you just love to hate Nintendo, or haven't got the time to read or visit their site. They are staying the course instead of abandoning ship because there is no reason to. The hardware can make plenty of money. They acknowledged a key factor: games. Nothing wrong with making fitness games especially if you do it better than Sony or MS. The Wii U has the most fun games on the most affordable system. Just wait, there will be plenty of games coming out. Really why are you mad at Nintendo?

Benjamin Quintero
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@eric - ugh.. had a long response, but i used an Apple product and now it's gone. I actually like Nintendo, just not anything they've done in years. It's just an opinion; pretty sure I still had that right :). If you really want to hear me pour on the hate, ask me about my iPad someday :).

@james - I wish the world was as progressive as you give them credit for. According to the Today show, video games for men over 30 is defined as "weird ones playing in the basement." Plenty of people saw that and didn't even blink.

@christian - a third pillar would make more sense than a digital platform tied to WiiU. If this is just another weapon in their war chest and it doesn't distract them from supporting their game consoles then it could be fine. It probably won't be something I follow but fitness is certainly a gimmick that makes boats of cash. The weight loss business is a $20b+ industry.

Eric Harris
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@Benjamin
What have they done wrong in years? Ok so the Wii did not go to HD. HD was new technology when they started developing their Wii system. The whole HD DVD v. Blu-Ray was still going on. Retailers were still selling HD tube TVs and HDMI cables cost $70-$80. Nintendo wanted an affordable console with older technology. Its a core philosophy of theirs to not use bleeding edge technology.
they made billions sold more consoles than the PS3 or Xbox360. They also made some great games. Really what is not to like?

G Irish
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@Eric Harris
Is it really a core philosophy of Nintendo to use older technology? The NES, SNES, Nintendo 64, and Gamecube were all just as powerful as the competition for the most part.

I think keeping the price down to around $200 and making a profit on each unit have been core philosophies of Nintendo, not necessarily making a console with old tech.

In that respect, the Wii U is actually a departure in strategy for Nintendo since at launch it cost $300-350, mostly because of the cost of the GamePad.

Eric Harris
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@ G Irish
Here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunpei_Yokoi
Read his career then read the Lateral Thinking part. This will answer many of the questions you have about Iwata-san and Nintendo. You will also see why the suggestions being made by many are never going to happen.

Benjamin Quintero
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eric - I assume you are referring to "...just not anything they've done in years." To that, I'm talking about the business direction they've chosen to take; not specifically how successful they've been. Yes Wii bank rolled; I'm happy for them. It doesn't mean I bought one for myself, that's all. I think that some of their games actually suffered in trying to prove that motion controls were useful, but overall it proved to be a commercial win.

I think Nintendo has done well to make fun experiences on "dated" hardware. It certainly is the way to maximize profits, when it works. I've enjoyed the DS series very much but my last Nintendo home console (still plugged in) is GameCube. The Wii just didn't grab me, and though the WiiU looked very promising their complacency with the success of the Wii and their underestimating the struggles of HD lead to poor timing of their next console. That lead me to have a wait-and-see attitude with them yet again. I still have 1 eye on the WiiU but that's about it; no fire in my gut to go buy one.

None of that means the WiiU is a failure or a success yet. Technically it's still early in the console cycle and they may even end up in the black when all is said and done because Nintendo tends to have long tail products.

Personally, their business practices are downright frustrating sometimes =) which is why they seem to make the headlines so often. It's easy clickbait, but they still manage to pull it off somehow, in spite of most common knowledge saying they will face plant.

Eric Harris
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I think I am beginning to understand you more. I too would like to see more mainstream games come from Nintendo(1st party or whoever makes them). I am not really looking forward to more QoL products, but I am sure someone out there is.

You are a game developer. Would it really be too difficult to produce a game you might like from the Wii U hardware? If yes, why? Would it be easier to develop a game with Wii U over PS4 (especially because you have more ways to distinguish yourself from other games, and an audience that does not need photo realism to be happy)?

Benjamin Quintero
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Eric - Well making a game for any console is not the easiest thing to do, mostly having to do with the business side of acquiring kits. I think that's what made XNA/XDK (though not exactly handled properly) such a promising idea and spawned what many people would classify as the XBLA experience (like Braid, Super Meat Boy, Fez, etc)..

I would consider developing a smaller WiiU title, but currently Nintendo doesn't make it easy. It's difficult to get dev kits and they generally try to push indies towards the Web SDK or Unity as the affordable alternatives. I kind of like working a little closer to the metal. GameCube was a half decent dev environment; fairly friend API, but the compiler had bugs and the linker was dog slow. I can't say if Wii or WiiU has improved any. If you are used to working on PC, going to console for the first time is a rude awakening.

The WiiU hardware itself, the streaming capability, is actually neat idea I think. I recently blogged about it:

http://ubm.io/1fv9N9q

wishing they would decouple it from the console and allow indies to create experiences on PC as a testbed or proof of concept while still profiting on Gamepad sales.

I don't know what PS4 has to offer, but some indies certainly appear to be impressed by Sony's support. I would imagine that Sony's choice to go with x86 architecture and more PC-like raster hardware has made development easier. I can at least hope that the common issues that really burdened previous generations are getting cut down by the use of more optimized and refined x86 compilers. But that's all conjecture; I haven't worked on any of the latest consoles.

Kaze Kai
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Nintendo still doesn't have the kind of cross-platform support Sony does so I don't see myself getting too excited. Them releasing DS games on the Wii U just means I'll have to repurchase games I already own on the VC store. I don't know how Nintendo hopes to accomplish a decent unified OS when they can't even grasp the concept of a unified ID that isn't locked to a single console.

Benjamin Quintero
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Correct me if I'm wrong here but also if your WiiU dies or you lose your 3DS they still aren't tracking your digital purchases, so it's "too bad, so sad" instead a Steam approach to just re-downloading them on your new device... Is this still how it works??

John Flush
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If you have a mynintendo account you can also get a Nintendo ID (this is new in the last few months). It tracks all your purchases and you can link that account to a device or change the device.

They have solved this problem. Though again, have failed to communicate it out very well.

Bob Johnson
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IF your WiiU or 3ds dies you need to send it in to NIntendo in order to transfer purchases. IF you lose your Wii U or 3ds you are out of luck unless Nintendo is persuaded otherwise.

Christian Nutt
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Yeah, they really have done a poor job with the NNID stuff thus far, but it sounds as though they will be ramping up development on it. They had better.

E Zachary Knight
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Based on this article, I got the impression that a unified NNID was on the way. One that you could use across platforms. So it will become more like Steam of XBLive.

Bob Johnson
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unified NNID is here. But purchases are still tied to hardware for now.

Benjamin Quintero
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Thanks. Yeah I haven't had the confidence in Nintendo to purchase anything digital from them. I hope that someday they can make it feel safe enough to use someday. I kind of still like to feel the product in my hand and know that it won't just disappear on the will of some digital platform. And not at least giving me the false sense of security that my purchases are tracked to re-download is just the nail in that coffin.

Bob Johnson
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This is the Nintendo I know. Stay the course. Resell old games for $$$ on new systems. Keep releasing quality games slowly but surely. And come out with new experiences ala NFC stuff and new "QoL" stuff.

Stuart Leslie
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Adding a controller to the console would be a good first step.

Eric Geer
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There is a multiple controllers...there's the gamepad, pro controller, and Wiimotes/nunchucks. Depending on the bundle you buy, you can get various controller options.

Stuart Leslie
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It doesn't need multiple controllers, it needs one that just works and is supported by all games.

Eric Geer
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It does....the gamepad.

John Mascarenas
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To me this sounds like their plan is to keep doing what they are doing. By definition this is insanity. Nintendo will continue to struggle. There are so many things wrong with the Wii U, and I don't believe being under powered is one of them. I remember when it was first announced, I was confused myself if it was actually a new console. There were all those pictures and videos of people using Wii-motes, and the console itself looks strikingly similar to the Wii. I could go on forever with my opinions of what they could do better but it wouldn't really matter, would it?

Bob Johnson
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It probably wouldn't matter and we might have heard it all before, but it could be interesting to hear what they could do better.

Michael Wenk
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I dunno what I expected. I'm glad their not throwing in the towel, but I wish they'd face objective reality. I don't think many look at the U as an accessory to the Wii. They look at the Wii U as an expensive hobbled tablet. They wonder why should they spend 350$ + 60$ per game when they can spend ~250$ + either F2P or 1-5$ per game. And they get a full featured tablet. Nintendo needs to either compete with Sony and MS on games, or with Google, Apple, Amazon, etc on the tablet space. Trying to both is a recipe for failure. And unfortunately for Nintendo, I don't see the Wii U succeeding in either space. Its too weak a game system, and doesn't have 10% of the functionality of any tablet.

Paul Speed
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This. I know games. I play games. I develop games.

Still, when I watch my son play Wii-U games in the store I have a hard time understanding why this isn't just like we've plugged his DS into the TV. If I don't get it then how many other consumers are struggling with this.

Joe Consumer: "Hmm, I can buy a 3DS for $170 or I can pay twice as much to plug it into my TV... or I can just buy a PS4 if I want to spend that much."

Regardless of how much the Wii-U costs to make, I think it's priced about $100 too high for its target audience.

Never mind that this is a 180 degree step backwards from what made the Wii cool (family multiplayer). It's probably telling that when the Wii consoles were scarce, so were the extra wii-motes. Hmm...

Bob Johnson
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@Paul

Well if you can't figure it out then there is a problem. The Gamepad lets you play console games off-tv. The Gamepad is really just a game controller with a screen. The Gamepad also introduces new ways to play console games.

And actually there is a lot of family multiplayer on the Wii U. It's a big attraction for my family.

Bob Johnson
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@Michael

Nintendo was deliberately trying to do a unique product. They weren't trying to be MS or Sony and weren't trying to be a tablet.

Christian Nutt
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"I don't think many look at the U as an accessory to the Wii. They look at the Wii U as an expensive hobbled tablet."

Because you have access to the market research that Nintendo does, right?

Paul Speed
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@Bob, then the stores are selling it wrong.

When I watch my ten year old play the store models, he's standing there playing on the handheld and barely looking at the screen (ie: essentially playing like he would his 3DS), meanwhile I get to stand and watch him play. I think to myself, "I'm not paying $350(?!?!) for that."

It is not at all obvious that there is anything as much fun as Wii Sports was, for example.

I mean, I know better and still I have to convince myself every time I see one of these displays.

The funny thing is, if they've just have put out an HD Wii a bit earlier, I'd have bought one. The regular Wii just looks awful on modern displays so ours was retired from the 'game room'.

If they sold the Wii-U as more of a Wii++ instead of 3DS++ then maybe they'd move some more units.

John Paduch
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@Christian - He said "I don't think", and that was clearly meant to carry over to the next sentence. Also, he's not the only one who gets that feeling. Technologically speaking, the WiiU tablet is a hobbled POS compared to any other tablet on the market, and since Nintendo has done fuck-all to let people know the capabilities of it (ie - why it even exists), there are probably a very large number of people who look at it and think "dafuq?"

PS - You're supposed to be a contributor to this site, so using a snark-heavy comment that we normally hear from fanboys is beneath you. Just FYI.

Bob Johnson
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@John

Christian has a point. Nintendo has the market research that most of us can only guess at.

And Iwata, in his presentation earlier today, actually stated that ...worse than consumers not understanding the Gamepad is many think it is a Wii accessory.

So consumers are thinking it is a Wii accessory. And if so it makes the $300 pricepoint look pretty expensive in that light.

Anyway Nintendo acknowledged there is a problem understanding what the Wii U is. And will attempt to fix that through marketing.

It is funny how adding just a dumb-screen to an otherwise typical game controller can cause such confusion.

Bob Johnson
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@Paul

Not sure it is the stores fault. It is Nintendo's fault. Part of their job is to adequately communicate their product to consumers.

Personally I think Nintendo could use some stores across the country to help demonstrate, promote, and explain their products in a hands-on best light environment. They do have one big store. But they need 50 stores across the country in major cities to show off their products.

Eric Harris
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@Paul
Depends on the game. Some games make really good use of the Gamepad some make very little use of it. The Gamepad can also double as a hand held. The hand held can also project on to a TV screen. Maybe the store had one of these other configurations going, in which case, yes the store is selling it wrong.

Michael Wenk
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I have no access to Nintendo's market research. However, considering they have made some bad decisions and that research was a factor, I'd argue that their research is not real accurate. This is what I mean by objective reality. We know from independent companies that the Wii U is not selling.

All I have is sales numbers and common sense. I go to a local store, see people using demo stations. It doesn't seem like those people have any uncertainty what the Wii U is. Since they're not buying the product, common sense says it doesn't fit any need they have. Do they look at it as a hobbled tablet? Well, that is my inference. Believe it or not as you see fit.

I am not, nor have I ever said I'm an expert. However, if the only way you can cast doubt on my statements is to point at their market research, which assuming they are competent in business, has to be wrong, then I wonder about your arguments.

Bob Johnson
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I guess this means there goes any thought that the Gamepad was going to be removed. They announced a NFC title for release this year.


OH and they didn't mention they were removing the Gamepad either. ;)




SD Marlow
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... as the Wii U rebounds, "third party will follow." Yeah, way to look forward.

At this point it looks like they will just dig in their heals and hold steady against the (obvious to everyone else) tide that may eventually drown them. The only BOLD move for them might be releasing a BLUE Wii U (OMG, it's now BLUE!!!).

The quality of life stuff just sounds like they have been a little too isolated, or, Iwata had some kind of health scare last year and is building the company around an audience of one.

Bob Johnson
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You think Blue? I'm thinking Mario Red or Luigi Green.


as for the 2nd part...come on... you don't know what the quality of life stuff is. Plus stuff like FitBit have been popular as of late. Ok QoL stuff aka any sort of health related entertainment products might not be something that gets you excited. I will grant you that.

But it seems the lesson they learned from the Wii is a lot of consumers like entertainment products that get them to move around a bit. The best thing about WiiFit were the mini-games.

Bob Johnson
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Here's a link to the presentation Iwata made today.

http://www.nintendo.co.jp/ir/en/library/events/140130/index.html

Good stuff in there.

No limits placed on the small development team for smartphone app including use of characters etc. It doesn't mean Mario games on iPhone. But Iwata keeps mentioning it has to be entertaining. They know they need consumers to check the app out on a consistent basis and are competing with various other mobile titles. it doesn't seem to rule out Nintendo making short mobile time wasters or other entertainment app nuggets to entertain and help sell Nintendo platforms.

IT's an NNID future. Acccount-based not system-based. Take from this what you will about eshop purchases in the future. IT sounds like they are moving towards that, but nothing specific. IT's about maintaining customers ties between hardware transitions.

IF some functionality of today's dedicated platforms makes more sense to be supported in other devices they will move resources towards that. Iwata mentioned buying games for your NIntendo platform through other devices.

Changing the way Nintendo games are bought. Flexible pricepoints for consumers meeting certain conditions. Buy more. Save more. That was one example. Or invite friends to play a title is another example of a condition that could result in a flexible pricepoint. IN other words stuff like STeam is doing. And realizing digital allows this model.

cheaper (more affordable) hardware/software platforms for new markets. whatever that means. I can only guess, but cloud gaming comes to mind.

Iwata says because they carefully crafted games with their IP over the years that they are in fortunate position today of having all this valuable IP, but are going to change that and start licensing them out to the right partners whether that's video games, toys or other digital uses. He notes they've been doing some of that in NA this past year.

Mission Gamepad. Priority to make use of Gamepad more this year especially in single player games. Miyamoto has been specifically assigned to this task.

Nintendo admits consumers don't know what the Gamepad does or worse that it is an accessory to the Wii.

Benjamin Quintero
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it will be interesting to see the new Nintendo when this is all in place. it's a big laundry list to knock out.

Jim Thompson
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If Nintendo plans on selling ip licences to 3rd party vendors Ocarina of Time to EA on ios would be a wonderful influx of cash.

And maybe Nintendo could learn a thing or two about its wii u along the way.

Bob Johnson
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I don't think that goes along with the message that Nintendo will not make smartphone games.

Paul Speed
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Furthermore, I think the one thing Nintendo still definitely has going for them are their first party titles. There can be no doubt that Pokemon, Mario, and Zelda sell hardware. Whether or not it can overcome a difficult price point aside.

Diluting these brands would mark the end of Nintendo, I think.

Josh Charles
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I agree with Bob and Paul. Your suggestion goes directly against the thing that they were most concrete about in the meeting: they won't put their games on other hardware.

Besides, even if they did do this, it could be potentially disastrous for the Pokemon brand. Fans of Nintendo who know the industry do not like EA and I just can't see them making a game that doesn't exploit the brand for the sake of get-rich-quick schemes.

Eric Harris
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Josh is right. If you look at the way EA handles IPs, you would never ever want them to develop for you.

Justin Kovac
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Not sure how using their current IP automatically turns into a great game that will probably have to be sold at $2 a piece and sell many millions to be worth their while and risk diluting their IP.

Benjamin Quintero
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jim - I don't think they will license core title IP's, just characters or alternate universes. It's kind of like when Link appeared in Soul Caliber for example. Or Hyrule Warriors may be a licensed title that uses the characters in an alternate world. Mario has appeared in just about every party game and sports game put out by Nintendo, it's likely that they may try to do the same across 3rd party games as well. They may license Kid Icarus or some other IP that is further out of their core pillars to an EA or Ubisoft, but I doubt that the character will leave the Nintendo platform, so don't expect him to appear on Xbox =).

There are plenty of "B" characters Nintendo would licenses.

- Wario is an easy choice to give to just about anyone.

- Nintendo Wars franchise (Adanced Wars, etc) could fit well in the Altus portfolio. The more I think about this one the more excited I get to think of the 2 screen tactical experience. Kind of shocking that it hasn't been done yet.

- Star Fox never seems to have gained ground since the original. EA DICE? might be a good fit for the large Battlefield experience in a Star Fox universe.

- Metroid has been pimped out to Team Ninja, so I'm sure it is in someone's hands. Reggie was trolling the fans during VGX and he almost said, "of course" when asked about another Metroid. I am dead certain that one is in production, the question is only who is making it.

Jennis Kartens
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Once again, Ben Parfitt from MCV nails it:

http://www.mcvuk.com/news/read/a-beginner-s-guide-to-iwata-s-plan
s-to-save-nintendo/0127421

Dave Long
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What did he nail exactly, how to act like a d-bag?

Jennis Kartens
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Or how to approach the situation with less fanboyism and a bit of humor instead.

Nintendo screwed up. Nintendo may did a lot right in their history, but they are not God and they are not what they present in their games. Nintendo is a company that had shown questionable actions in many territories for some time now, and it is good that they are not treated with too much hailing everywhere. In fact, its good. And entertaining in this case.

Christian Nutt
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How to misspell "Satoru" in the first sentence and get me to close the tab.

Eric Harris
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I had to laugh when I read the article. I think the writer is a wonderful comedian. He is poorly informed though... Why doesn't Nintendo make a Mario movie?....lol


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