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Trion's DRM-free digital games shop Glyph is now open for business
Trion's DRM-free digital games shop Glyph is now open for business
June 3, 2014 | By Alex Wawro




Trion Worlds is launching its new digital distribution platform Glyph today in a bid to compete with established services like Steam and Origin by offering developers a smaller marketplace with a built-in audience: the millions of players who have to launch Glyph to play Trion titles like Rift.

The company announced Glyph back in March, a week before GDC 2014, with the stated goal of curating a marketplace for digital goods and games.

"Because we very intentionally have a smaller number of partners, we'll be able to pay far more attention to those partners," Trion Worlds CEO Scott Hartsman told Gamasutra in a recent phone call.

"We're able to make sure that we don't add so many games to the platform that A, users have a bad game experience or B, developers get flooded out."

Today the platform's online storefront officially opens for business, though Trion has been quietly transitioning the launchers for its games to Glyph for months.

The digital storefront's opening lineup includes both Trion Worlds titles like Rift as well as third-party games like Stoic's The Banner Saga and the Early Access version of InXile's Wasteland 2. Notably, all single-player games sold through Glyph can be downloaded and played offline without additional DRM safeguards.

Hartsman claims that Trion is looking to pursue a variety of partnership deals with developers going forward, from barebones sale agreements to co-marketing partnerships to crowdfunding and even full-on tech integration if developers want access to Trion's tools, including the in-game analytics platform that the company uses to track player behavior in MMO games like Rift.


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Comments


Michael Hartman
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We are super excited to be a part of Glyph. The folks at Trion are amazing. We were able to have two games ready for the launch and we can't wait to do more in the future.

Ardney Carter
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DRM-free is always welcome. I'll have to remember to check this out when I'm ready to do another round of game purchases.

Dane MacMahon
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I love GOG's DRM free aspect but they're lacking in many areas. For one thing I'm sorry Japan but I want regional restrictions on GOG so they can bring out more games. Secondly their patching system for modern games is terrible. Lastly their inflexible pricing on classics seems to be more trouble than it's worth, the market sets the price anyway.

If Glyph can bring competition in these areas and remain DRM free I will be glad to take a look.

Dane MacMahon
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Can't maximize the window, clicking store doesn't take you to the store homepage from a game page, forced me to make a lot of weird MMO style account protection systems. Not a good start.

Lex DeBussy
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What do you mean about Japan and regional restrictions? That sounds like a bad thing for foreigners who want to play Japanese games.

Dane MacMahon
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@ Lex

GOG has a "games that can be sold worldwide only" policy. This means a lot of games I could buy there DRM free don't come out, because they can't be sold in every country on the planet due to licensing issues. This most often is a problem in Japan from what I have read.

I feel bad for those who can't buy all games, but at the same time why punish me just so we're even? I'd rather GOG sell all the games they can.

Ian Uniacke
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I guess you should know that in a recent email from GOG they said (they will be) "unveiling .. GOG.com's new technology taking the platform to the next level".

Hakim Boukellif
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Wouldn't submitting to region restrictions mean they would have to have subsidiaries in every country they're selling to? After all, even if someone from Japan buys something on GOG, it's still technically being sold in Poland, so only the Polish legal situation should apply to the seller.

Anyway, I see regional restrictions as being almost as bad as DRM, especially on a platform where digital distribution is the norm, so I consider GOG's decision to only accept games that can be sold worldwide to be consistent with their decision to only accept games that don't have any DRM. I'd rather have a future situation where stores like GOG become an unignorable force and publishers have no choice but to sort out their licensing issues.

Jennis Kartens
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"I see regional restrictions as being almost as bad as DRM, "

Indeed. It actually is part of DRM in my opinion.

Region restrictions are one of the major reasons people still lean over to uncomplicated illegal versions instead of buying originals.


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