Gamasutra: The Art & Business of Making Gamesspacer
View All     RSS
October 23, 2014
arrowPress Releases
October 23, 2014
PR Newswire
View All





If you enjoy reading this site, you might also want to check out these UBM Tech sites:


Game Developer Salary Survey 2014: The results are in! Exclusive
Game Developer Salary Survey 2014: The results are in!
July 22, 2014 | By Kris Graft




Gamasutra recently polled over 4,000 game developers worldwide, asking them the question: How much money did you make?

We did this as part of the annual Game Developer Salary Survey — the most extensive survey of its kind in the game industry. This year, the survey was run by Gamasutra in lieu of our beloved sibling magazine, Game Developer.

You can download the meaty eight-page report in PDF form right here. Gamasutra will be releasing Salary Survey highlights throughout the week on our special Salary Survey page.

So, onto the topline stats:

Salaried game developers

In 2013, salaried game developers in the U.S. made an average of $83,060 last year, down 2 percent from the year prior.

Business and management salaries topped all other disciplines once again this year, averaging $101,572, followed by audio professionals ($95,682) and programmers ($93,251). Quality assurance professionals earned the lowest average salary at $54,833.

Here are the rest of the disciplines we covered (U.S.):
  • Business and management: $101,572
  • Audio professionals: $95,682
  • Programmers: $93,251
  • Artists and animators: $74,349
  • Producers: $82,286
  • Game designers: $73,864
  • Quality Assurance: $54,833
  • In Canada, salaried game developers, including all disciplines, made an average annual salary of USD $71,445 (up 9 percent year-on-year) in 2013, whereas Europe-based game developers made USD $46,232 (flat).

    The indie report

    Non-salaried solo independent game developers made an average of $11,812 (down 49 percent year-on-year) last year, while individual members of an indie team made an average of $50,833 (up 161 percent). (These averages do not take into account indies who made less than $10,000, or over $200,000.)

    The drop in solo salaries seems alarming, while the rise in indie team salaries seems promising -- but be careful in making assumptions about this data. We’ve found that average indie salaries are prone to big fluctuations over the years.

    Check out the full report!

    Conducted in May 2014 for the period between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013, Gamasutra gathered well over 4,000 unique responses worldwide, with help from market research company Audience Insights.

    You can download the full PDF here, and check out Salary Survey highlights all this week at our special Salary Survey page on Gamasutra.


    Related Jobs

    Avalanche Studios
    Avalanche Studios — New York, New York, United States
    [10.22.14]

    UI Programmer
    Avalanche Studios
    Avalanche Studios — New York, New York, United States
    [10.22.14]

    UI Artist/Designer
    Wargaming.net
    Wargaming.net — Hunt Valley, Maryland, United States
    [10.22.14]

    Lead UI Engineer
    Wargaming.net
    Wargaming.net — Chicago, Illinois, United States
    [10.22.14]

    Lead UI Engineer










    Comments


    Guillaume Boucher-Vidal
    profile image
    Am I the only one who think these salaries are way off? It might be because devs aren't paid as high in the province of Quebec, but I've never seen a game designer paid 73k, a QA paid more than a few dollars above minimum wage or an audio guy who wasn't struggling to make ends meet.

    Seems like all of these numbers except management are bloated.

    Stephen Korrick
    profile image
    I'm guessing this is because of how many people work, and therefore must pay rent/survive in, California. But certainly the numbers I'm familiar with in Vancouver generally seem systematically somewhat lower than these numbers across the board.

    mr jasler
    profile image
    It's because you live in quebec ;) everyone I know that works in the industry there (ubi or gameloft etc..) know that the salaries are the worst.

    Alan Barton
    profile image
    @"these salaries are way off"

    I totally agree. Even for the US they sound high, and as for here in the UK, its no where near "Programmers: $93,251"

    In the UK its hard to find full time *games* lead programming jobs that want to pay even $70k (£41k). They often want to pay up to just below about £40k ($68k) (and £45k ($76k) scares them off and they don't usually want to know) ... Its been low for years. Its taken more than a decade for it to rise from about £35k ($60k).

    Also the "average UK games industry yearly wage" (2013 figures) is just £33123 ($56513.80)
    i.e. http://www.mcvuk.com/news/read/uk-games-industry-salary-survey-wh
    at-are-you-worth/0110018

    Here's an interesting calculation...

    There's about 9000 UK development staff, so with an overall average of £33123 per member of staff, the total employment cost is £33123 * 9000 = £298,107,000 per year.

    What's interesting is that according to UK figures, the UK games development industry earned £2.19 billion in 2013. :) (Retail is higher of course (its £3.226bn to be precise), so I'm just talking about development income).

    So that means there's about £1.8B that the staff are not seeing!. :)

    Here's the government figures... "There are currently around 500 games development studios in the UK, employing around 9000 staff. In 2013 sales of video games in the UK totalled £2.19 billion." (info from this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/video-games-tax-relief-passes-final-hu rdle)

    If all the UK staff were seeing all the income, then the UK average wage would be £2190000000/9000 = £243333 ($415k)

    So someone is getting very rich, but its very evident its not the staff.

    I don't know the US business side of the industry enough, so it would be interesting if one of you in the US could do this calculation for US development industry income & total staff & average staff pay etc... as it would be interesting to see where the money is going in the US (and the majority unfortunately won't be to the staff). But it would still be worth knowing where the money is going.

    (From these above figures, it means UK staff are only getting on average 13% of the income their work is generating in income). It would be interesting to see if US is higher or lower than this 13%?.

    Alan Barton
    profile image
    I've been trying to do this same calculation for the US. This Gamasutra article says the average wage is $83,060 last year.

    The questions I still don't know are:
    (1) How many people in the US games development industry?.

    (2) How much money doesn't the US games development industry earn?. (Which isn't the same as how much retail of games in the US earns as some companies are not US companies earning from retail).

    Can anyone help fill in these figures?. It would be very interesting to know.

    Aaron Oostdijk
    profile image
    -Edit- Just read it again, and it's indeed just the industry. Where does most of that added income go though? It must end up somewhere...

    Robert Green
    profile image
    Alan - I might just be getting thrown off by terminology, but the phrase "In 2013 sales of video games in the UK totalled £2.19 billion" says to me that consumers in the UK spent 2.19bn, not that the UK games industry made 2.19bn, which is something very different indeed. In the latter case, your questions are valid. In the former, that's the money UK consumers are spending on ALL games, meaning that most of that revenue will be heading offshore.

    Kelvin Reid
    profile image
    Who told you QA jobs only pay a few dollars over minimum wage? I work in QA and I'm making over $8.00 above minimum wage.

    Alan Barton
    profile image
    @"income go though? It must end up somewhere"

    Someone is getting rich. :)

    £2190000000 - £298107000 = £1891893000 going somewhere?

    So with about 500 companies in the UK, that means

    £1891893000/500 = £3783786

    I guess some of it goes on running costs like offices etc.. but even then:
    (Office space (even in central London), electric, heating and £1k new hardware budget per person, is still only about £30M for 9000 people). So even if we say double that, its still only £60M out of £1.8B unaccounted for. So company running costs don't effect the total that much.

    So each company on average has £3,783,786 unaccounted for per year. So even after running costs its still well over £3.5M. So as the staff are not seeing that money, then I guess after running costs, the directors are taking it.

    Of course that's on average, so some companies will have directors who will be taking a few million whilst other companies will have them getting £100k etc...

    I think I'll remember that next time the subject of pay rises comes up.
    Alternatively its another reason to go indie, and cut these people out of the income, because whilst I love the work, it would be nice to be able to better afford to live and this lack of pay isn't fair.

    Guillaume Boucher-Vidal
    profile image
    I worked in QA for three years in a half. I ended up with a decent salary, 35k a year, but only once I was leading a team of specialists so I was an exception. I also considered this to be a very good pay actually. I also know people who worked in QA in 5 different companies, including one in LA, and they all were paid a few bucks above minimum.

    Ernest Phillips
    profile image
    What state are you in?

    Joe Stewart
    profile image
    I'm in the US, not in the games industry but in "computing" more generally, and honestly these numbers seem low to me. I suppose everyone is biased by their own experience, but the programmers I know make six figures easily.

    Ian Uniacke
    profile image
    The US doesn't get free medicare and also they have to pay for their own retirement. I'd estimate that at about a 15% higher salary. Further the economies in every country are different, so you can't compare apples to oranges.

    Regarding where does the money go, it's a general rule of thumb in any industry that about 10% of retail ends up going to the primary producer. This is because each step down the line to the consumer consumes about an extra 10%. This would approximately match your calculations, that is, out of &1.8 billion vs &300 million. It's not some guy stealing all your money, this is just to do with market efficiency.

    Giuseppina Visconti
    profile image
    Software development pays a lot better then game development. People usually go into game development due to passion for the industry as opposed to pay. I know programmers and animators who took pay cuts from their respective industries to go into games, and not surprisingly I know people who left the games industry for software development and animation because they were tired of the over-time and wanted the security of higher wages. This is my experience in Toronto, Ontario; so it may be different in other places, but generally I hear Software Development treats programmers leaps and bounds better than the Game's Industry.

    Ernest Phillips
    profile image
    What fields are they in?

    Greg Scheel
    profile image
    California coastal real estate just went past the all time, pre-crash high in Q2, at least in many popular neighborhoods. This has a drastic effect on how much one needs to live around here.

    Alan Barton
    profile image
    @Robert Green: "says to me that consumers in the UK spent 2.19bn"

    No, I was very careful with that. Consumer spending was £3.226bn. The 2.19bn was how much the developers were earning.


    @Joe Stewart, "honestly these numbers seem low to me."

    You are right, they are very low for computing more generally. Friends where are contracting outside of the games industry can get about $600 to $750 a day. (£350 to £450 a day). I've done a few (full time) jobs outside of the games industry and even they do pay more. It tends to be the case that any job that is considered fun and desirable pays less, because more people want the fun jobs. Games and film post-production programming roles pay way less than say working for a bank.


    @Greg Scheel:
    Yes the cost of living is expensive. But then coastal real estate all around the world is expensive, but then being in a capital city like London is very expensive. In London, I would say its hard to find a clean flat around the outer edge of London (within under a 2 hour commute per day into central London) for under $1500 (£900) a month and if you want to be more central prices start at £1200 ($2000) for even small places. On the money programmers earn, we can't afford £1200 a month ... £900 is hard enough to afford and if you want to buy, forget it. The cost of homes even in a flea pit part of London were rising at £1500 per month ($2500) when I tried to look and so I'm stuck having to rent a small flat.

    Robert Green
    profile image
    I'm still not entirely sold. I traced that £3.226bn number back to a 2011 figure by MCVUK compiled from a variety of sources, including expos and toys, so these two numbers come from different years, and possibly cover different categories. I still don't see a good justification for assuming that either is representative of the revenue the UK industry rather than consumer spending in the UK.

    Alan Barton
    profile image
    @Ian Uniacke:"it's a general rule of thumb in any industry that about 10% of retail ends up going to the primary producer."

    That's an outdated rule which never really applied, because it was always up for negotiation even when we were tied only to publishers ... But it is what we have been told for decades (until you look for yourself into the details). Also these days digital distribution has transformed the share of income for developers and forced traditional publishers and distributor to adjust their deals.

    Also I've looked up (and others I've worked with have looked up) directors pay in multiple companies I've worked at over the years and these figures I calculated above look entirely consistent with what we've seen from government documents. Its not at all uncommon for directors to be on £100k+ and even £200k+ is common. Of course it depends on the size of the company, because bigger publisher/developers will often have many directors who are each getting multiple millions per year.

    Also these not at all the exception, they are common figures. (The exception is into the tens of millions of income, like "New Zynga CEO Don Mattrick's Total Pay Package Is Over $50 Million" ... http://www.businessinsider.com/zyngas-new-ceo-don-mattricks-salar
    y-2013-7

    Hundreds of thousands is low for directors pay these days. Just look at industry figures. Directors in most companies are in hundreds of thousands these days and the CEOs are even higher.

    Giuseppina Visconti
    profile image
    It's the same in Ontario, whatever is listed on this pdf expect it to be 15-20k lower for people who actually work these jobs.

    Lex Allen
    profile image
    Seriously doubt anyone is making that much money.

    TC Weidner
    profile image
    I agree, data is always suspect when you ask people via a survey. People making a lot are way more happy to share ( and sorta brag) about their income, while those making middle to lower salaries would and will rather not share that information.

    In the US, salary and how much money you make is still a taboo subject for most people.

    Ian Uniacke
    profile image
    I doubt they simply collected all the answers and then went x/y. Big market research firms have very complicated methods for finding their results. If they know that low income people are less likely to report their personal income the research firms would most likely add a multiplier to account for this face.

    TC Weidner
    profile image
    complicate methods, oh you mean assumptions. Ie.. they guess

    I've seen how statistics are suppose to be done in theory, and I have seen how they are often done in practice, they barely resemble one another. Just like most things.

    Timothy Matthews
    profile image
    How in the world does a programmer with "some college" experience make more than a programmer with a Doctoral's Degree?

    Ron Dippold
    profile image
    They started working earlier, have more years of experience on the job.

    It might also be a supply/demand thing. There's not a lot of /need/ for a PhD in game dev except for a few key areas and most people don't like hiring 'overqualified' candidates.

    Anyhow, it looks like in this industry the doctorate is worth something, but never catches up with head start for the people who just dropped out of college and started working.

    TC Weidner
    profile image
    I dont buy that for a minute. Plus in this new world economy, people are made to start over careers and change fields and reinvent themselves over and over.

    The one thing that has always remained true however is. Is not so much what you know, as much as it is WHO you know.

    Juan Mendoza
    profile image
    game industry is not about degree but innovation, passion and talent. you don't need degree to implement verlet integration. The question is how to fit in 1ms 5000 constraints, or do synthetic animations on a fly. the best programmers i know are with high school or dropouts .

    Denver Coulson
    profile image
    For the indie salaries, the average is $11,812 but they remove all data below $10,000 and above $200,000 for the indie averages. I'm guessing this removal is only for team member averages because it seems strange that the average is so close to the min they included. Is this accurate? Even having 9 indies make $10,000 and 1 indie make $50,000 puts the average at $14,000. There must be a LOT of people making the minimum.

    Lex Allen
    profile image
    There are even more making < $0.00.

    scott anderson
    profile image
    Indie development salaries have always been weird and I don't think Gamasutra has nailed the methodology for tracking them yet. "Salaries" for solo creators and many small teams don't make sense, so it might be more interesting to have an indie revenue survey that tracks how much revenue people's titles are bringing in, on what platforms, and how many titles that developer has released, years of experience, etc. There are other problems with filtering greater than $200K, as any successful indie game makes significantly more than $200K lifetime, so they're filtering out successes and insuring only people that are barely surviving, along with a handful of rare mid-range successes, show up in the survey.

    Ian Uniacke
    profile image
    Well that's the more useful number. You're better off hearing that you have a 90% chance of making not much then being misled that you have a good chance of making 50,000 because Notch made 150 million dollars.

    Eric McConnell
    profile image
    I'd like to point out that while Game Designer's average is 73k, designers are generally non-exempt which means they earn overtime pay. Depending on the company you work for, that 73k is more comparable to what a programmer, exempt salary, makes or maybe more.

    Josh Sutphin
    profile image
    I have never in my 10 years in the industry worked at a studio that classified me as non-exempt, nor have I ever met a single designer that was classified as non-exempt.

    What magical utopia are you in and how do I go to there. :(

    Eric McConnell
    profile image
    (Note: I'm not a lawyer so take this with a grain of salt). In most states, including California, "Computer Professionals" such as programmers are exempt while creative and art positions (artist and designers) are non-exempt. Check with your state laws.

    I would also add, that a lot of companies will try to strong-arm designers in working long hours, especially during crunch, with no overtime. While your work agreement may say you are exempt from overtime, it's actually the law and not your contract that establishes the class of worker you are.

    It's up to you whether you want to meet with HR and depend fair pay. I'd imagine a studio who makes artist and designers crunch without overtime is also a studio that would fire you for bringing up laws that require them to pay you overtime.

    Again, I'm not a lawyer but that is both my understanding and personal experience with the law.

    Josh Sutphin
    profile image
    If that's true, then I've been screwed out of something like $120,000 in overtime pay.

    Well, AAA development is in my rear-view mirror for a reason. :P

    Colin Sullivan
    profile image
    California lawyer here, but don't rely on this as legal advice.

    I'm pretty sure that artists and designers can be considered exempt. Different companies may choose not to utilize the exemption, but they fall under the Professional Exemption in California. They also only need a minimum weekly wage of $720 to qualify compared to the minimum for programmers of $1,640.

    Of course it is sort of fact specific so not everyone will qualify, but that is true of everyone who is exempt.

    Idris Z
    profile image
    7 years working as a game designer in LA for an AAA development team, this indeed is the case.

    Josh Sutphin
    profile image
    The salary survey is always interesting, but I'd be even more interested in seeing salary data normalized by regional cost-of-living.

    Also, it's *fascinating* to note the dip in pay for 4-year degree holders (bottom of page 6). Programmers, artists, and designers made less with a 4-year degree than with literally *any other education level at all*.

    David Paris
    profile image
    I noticed that too. My suspicion is that actual time spent working your craft holds more weight than picking up a lot of years of theoretical knowledge at school. The sooner you get started, the more experience you will acquire.

    SD Marlow
    profile image
    Yeah, as already noted in the comments, there is a huge gap in pay based on cost of living. But, this was all self-reported data, and likely from someone that has a few years experience. This does NOT reflect actual starting wages. To that end, I'd speculate that "office/manager" type jobs are of higher pay because they don't re-start at a low pay level with each new project, while the turn-over rate for "in the trenches" workers is high.

    Julianne Harty
    profile image
    I'd like to see the ranges too within 2 standard deviations. Averages are not the most useful if the dataset is spread out dramatically, or if there are a couple of super high earners that shift the average up.

    James Melsha
    profile image
    I know it'd never happen, but it'd be nice if they'd actually put out the raw dataset - stripped of any demographics that could actually identify individuals, of course.

    It's easy enough to crunch your own numbers if you have the data to do it from - and with their report being nothing but averages, it doesn't feel like the most useful analysis of the data they have available. I'd like to at least know what the distribution looks like - a bell curve would not really have been that difficult to add to the report.

    Aaron San Filippo
    profile image
    I think this description points to a problem with the survey methodology:

    "Solo indie
    developers earned
    an average income of $11,812
    in 2013, down 49 percent
    from 2012’s $23,130 average.
    This drop may be attributed
    to the fact that most anyone
    can make and release a
    game if they want to, from
    experienced full-time game
    developers to part-time
    hobbyists with less
    experience
    with the market"

    Why does the survey ask hobbyists what they make in a year, and then factor that into "indie salary"? This would be like asking folks who sell their garden vegetables in the farmer's market once a month into "Farmer salary."

    One of the first questions the salary should ask is whether the individuals are doing game development as their primary job (perhaps 35+ hours/week) - and exclude those who answer 'no.'

    Kris Graft
    profile image
    Hey Aaron: The average indie salary only includes developers who made more than $10,000 in 2013, and were capped at $200,000, in order to avoid outliers skewing the data.

    Joel McDonald
    profile image
    Seems like sub-$10,000 indies being labeled as outliers is really odd--I would guess the vast majority of indies made less than $10k in 2013.

    Aaron San Filippo
    profile image
    Kris: That's a start, but wouldn't it be more meaningful to differentiate between those who are working full-time (or near full-time) at game development from those who aren't? Or perhaps a question such as: "Is game development your primary source of income"?

    I realize the line between "professional" and "hobbyist" if fuzzy, but if dollar amount earned is the only filter you apply, I think we'll always see wild fluctuations in the data like this.

    I think the real question people want the answer to is: "Can I make a living with indie game development" - and it's meaningless if the average factors in those who aren't even really attempting to do that.

    Sam Watkins
    profile image
    I would like to see the indie salaries as a graph of salary by percentile. Perhaps logartithmic on the salary axis. It's very hard to make sense of it as it is.

    I agree with distinguishing full time / serious indie devs versus hobbyist devs. I'm a hobbyist game dev, my $0 should not be counted in there with serious developers, even in the "excluded below $500" category.

    Also, the median is arguably a more useful average than the mean. But percentile graphs are the best!

    Peter Harries
    profile image
    Sounds very off to me... Average QA salary of $50k?! Would be nice!

    Melissa Hadley
    profile image
    A lot of their respondents went to GDC or are members of this site. Considering GDC is well out of the price range of most QA testers/engineers/leads, this would drive the average up.

    If they marketed their survey a bit more than they have outside of the site itself, which I admit I've been away until Kotaku's coverage of these results hit my FB feed, they might get a more representative sample.

    Aaron San Filippo
    profile image
    It's also frustrating that once again, the "Gender Gap" section makes no account for experience, instead only comparing the broad pattern of what women vs. men are paid by profession.

    i.e: Are women who have the same amount of experience paid less than men with the same experience? How many years of experience do women in this industry have vs. men?

    This would be very useful information: is the biggest issue that needs to be tackled that women don't stick around long enough - or is there an issue with leadership and management actually paying women with the same experience less than their male counterparts?

    I suspect this data is in there, but it's not presented in the .pdf.

    Aaron San Filippo
    profile image
    Why is this important? Because of stories like this (based on last year's survey):

    http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2013/04/04/game-industry-gender-w
    age-gap-is-horrendous/

    "It’s despicable, and the only valid response is for those in senior positions at publishers and developers to not pretend it isn’t them, to look at their own figures, and to rectify discrepancies."

    See what's happened here? The assumption is that the problem is senior leadership unfairly paying women less for the same work. What if the biggest problem is actually that women leave the industry in disgust after a year or two (see #onereasonwhy) and we should be focusing on more systemic problems? It could be that women with equivalent experience are actually paid *more* than men? Instead this survey leaves it up to the reader to postulate.

    This isn't something we should have to guess about - you have the data.

    David Paris
    profile image
    Good observations and altogether valid.

    Aaron Oostdijk
    profile image
    I'm part of an indie team, and the income does fluctuate heavily from year to year usually because not every year has a release, and if there is a release most of the income is generated shortly after said release (most recently this was 2012 for us, with less dramatic 2013 releases). That said, the average seems pretty high to me, even for our best year. I guess there's just a very large gap between highest and lowest in that group.

    Ian Griffiths
    profile image
    In the UK I've seen QA paid relatively highly in the mobile and casual field, anywhere from £30-£40k. Much higher than when I started out earning £6.50 an hour and only know if you were working the next day at the end of this one!

    It is much more about enjoying what you're doing, if you're going into games just to make money - you're doing it wrong. That said, given the massive profit in the gaming industry it would be nice to see more of that shared with the people actually making them.

    George Menhal III
    profile image
    I think the salaries should be higher, considering how demanding development can be for everyone involved. I especially believe that actual developers should be paid higher than suits and marketers. Another disheartening figure is the very low income reported by non-salaried, solo indie developers. It makes you wonder how these people even survive throughout the year.

    One thing I really don't like and have never liked about the gaming industry is the extreme volatility and instability of it all. Hardware manufacturers die overnight, studios are closed down left and right. It's like at the same time that the so-called "indie revolution" took place and now we've got all these low-budget titles to play, more and more studios and IPs are being usurped by the biggest publishers on the planet, homogenizing everything into either huge corporation or flat-broke indie developer, and not a lot of middle ground left after those two camps have been accounted for.

    I guess the "middle-class" salary here would be testers, who are never treated very well and are forced to sign demeaning work contracts that include total loss of benefits, furlough, etc.

    I mean I really just don't get it sometimes. It's just sad to see that a lot of these guys are giving up their best years to companies who are so up against the wall with all the financial risks that in order to turn profits they need to treat employees and developers somewhat like cattle. Meanwhile, there is always the call to go indie, but that apparently goes hand-in-hand with starvation.

    Good time to be a gamer and a consumer. We have more options and game styles than ever before. But a bad time to be a developer, I think.

    Kevin Sultan
    profile image
    Is it possible to detail the European figures?

    Kris Graft
    profile image
    Hi Kevin,

    We break down European salaries by discipline in the full PDF (linked in story).

    John Maurer
    profile image
    I think the overall consensus here is that these figures are bloated between $10k - $20k on average, with management undershot by roughly the same amount. I mean, how large was your sample compared to the estimated population? Was there a low feedback/participation for the survey? From my own experience coupled with colleagues in the biz, this sounds more accurate:

    Business and management: $121,572
    Audio professionals: $75,682
    Programmers: $73,251
    Artists and animators: $54,349
    Producers: $62,286
    Game designers: $53,864
    Quality Assurance: $34,833

    Ray Dahlia
    profile image
    The numbers sound accurate for California, but high for the rest of the country.

    Simon Carless
    profile image
    Not sure what it is in this survey, but I know CA + WA together make up as much as 60% of game development in the U.S. - so I guess it makes sense that it would trend in that direction?

    Curtis Turner - IceIYIaN
    profile image
    I made $0 on Monsters of War (:

    Masaru Wada
    profile image
    I'd like to know about us translators/localizers :-(

    Lloyd Knott
    profile image
    Not entirely sure how credible this data is, considering you have breakdowns of the salaries by job largely being senior roles(i'm guessing the special people who get to go to GDC) and then you compare the big numbers with the quotes at the end about nobody being paid enough.

    It kinda looks like those people quoted aren't represented or they're just really ungrateful seniors and directors.

    [User Banned]
    profile image
    This user violated Gamasutra’s Comment Guidelines and has been banned.


    none
     
    Comment: