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Cage:  Heavy Rain  Sales Sent 'Very Strong Message' About Innovation
Cage: Heavy Rain Sales Sent 'Very Strong Message' About Innovation
March 26, 2010 | By Staff

March 26, 2010 | By Staff
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More: Console/PC



David Cage, head of French developer Quantic Dream, said that one of his team's goals with its latest title, Heavy Rain, was to break the rules of video game design in order to bring real emotion into a game. While an admirable goal, it's a risky commercial endeavor.

But after the PlayStation 3-exclusive Heavy Rain debuted at the end February, it managed to break the U.S. NPD retail top 10 for the month, selling 219,000 units. In its opening week, it debuted at the very top of the weekly UK retail sales charts.

"No, I didn't expect it to be that popular," Cage told Gamasutra in a new feature interview. "I was quite used to having critical acclaim and commercial mid-success. This is honestly what I was expecting for Heavy Rain. I think that no one even at Sony was expecting this. No one even in the most positive reviews we got -- all the critics were saying, 'I loved it. I just hope it's going to sell, because if it doesn't it it will be a pity.'"

He added, "But I think the success took everybody by surprise, including Sony, because the game was sold out in the UK in two days; so you couldn't find it on the shelves. You couldn't buy it, pretty much, after two days. So it was really a shock. And same thing in Japan, which is even more of a surprise: the game is sold out. You can't buy it. And that's great; I think it means a lot."

Quantic Dream's last game was Indigo Prophecy, known as Fahrenheit in Europe. While that game did receive a positive response from critics, it certainly did not light up the sales charts. Cage saw Heavy Rain as somewhat of a test of the industry, whether the games sector was ready to support and accept a new kind of triple-A game.

"[The strong performance] means something because during the development of Heavy Rain, we said, 'This game, whether it's a commercial success or a commercial failure, is going to send a very strong message to the industry about how interested the market is in innovative concepts and games exploring new directions.'"

He continued, "If it's a failure, it's going to mean that, for the whole industry, 'Don't change anything! Continue to make the same games because this is what the market wants, and if you try something else you'll fail.' But if the game was a success, it would mean that the market was eager for something deeper and something new."

With sales data as ammunition, Cage feels that he and his team have proven a point. "Now I can say, 'Look! The market wants innovation.' So this is what we should concentrate on now, and Heavy Rain is a very strong message to publishers to take more risks and support innovation."


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Comments


R G
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Good article. It's great to see the game succeed.



Maybe we can start seeing more games like this and less MW2 clones.

John Giordano
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I can't believe he thinks the game sold well!

R G
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@John--- Idk what to believe. My gut instinct tells me that it isn't selling well, and Adam Sessler from G4 said on Feedback that it was selling OK.



Many of my friends own the game, so who knows. Hopefully we'll see an actual NPD chart or something.

Sugar Darr
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I didn't have time to play this game when it was released, but it was important for me to pre-order it. I wanted this game to be a success. Even if the game wasn't going to be perfect, I want to see this area grow and be successful. I finally got around to playing through it last week and I was totally blown away at the production value. I can't wait for more games in this genre.

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John Giordano
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It's not selling well. It was in 10th place on NPD. For all the hype and marketing that was behind it, that is not what I call a success. Mainstream consumers are not interested in a giant cutscene, they actually want a game to go with it.

Tom Newman
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I bought this HD version of Simon myself just to see what the hype was about, traded it the weekend after it released, and the employee at gamestop said I was about the 20th trade in that day for Heavy Rain. There was a ton of great marketing and press releases, and I can see why people say this is so innovative (as they did with Dragon's Lair in it's day), but time may paint a different picture.

Jonathan Gilmore
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I think this is all spin to convince Sony's core that Heavy Rain is popular, therefore they should get it. Heavy Rain was often cited alongside God of War 3 as a PS3 heavy hitter for this quarter, and Sony is desperate to make it a millon seller.

Ary Monteiro Jr
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I've read it was sold out in the UK, but SCEE pushed the game harder than SCEA afaik. Anyway, if it didn't top charts, it still performed a lot better than anyone expected, that's what Cage is talking about. I was actually surprised at how well received it was among most gamers, looked like a more polarizing title. Saying that it's a spin to convince anyone that the game was sucessful, actually sounds like a conspiracy theory.

Christian Nutt
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It actually did top the UK charts -- for a week, I believe, but still. It hit number one, all format.



The game hit the top 10 in all three major regions. That was not anticipated by Cage, clearly. And hitting the NPD top 10 on one week's worth of sales with no TV commercial (as I understand it, anyway) is pretty impressive, especially given the unusually tough competition in 2010 Q1.

Jonathan Gilmore
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@Ary-Ever heard of puffery?

The United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC) defined puffery as a "term frequently used to denote the exaggerations reasonably to be expected of a seller as to the degree of quality of his product, the truth or falsity of which cannot be precisely determined." In this case, the puffery is how well received the game is, of which I am dubious.

Sean Currie
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If VGChartz is to believed, Heavy Rain is just shy of cracking 1 million units sold. Given its content and the fact that it wasn't a multi-platform release that's not a bad number and certainly higher than I was expecting.



When you consider Uncharted 2 sold 3 million that's a pretty huge success story.

Ary Monteiro Jr
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@Jonathan why would be puffery (no, first time i've heard the term) if it's true? The game will never make GTA numbers, it is obvious, but it's a sucess story, no reason to doubt that. It's doing better than Indigo Prophecy did, and that was a multiplatform title, and the overall reception has been far more positive than negative.



considering it's a game not even the hardcore audience had a clue of what would become, it's not a small feat.

gus one
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I've been stopping myself buying this every day this week as I walk past Game going home every day. I know I will cave in. Looks and from what I hear that it is brilliant gaming entertainment.

Travis Hoffstetter
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I know there is controversy on the accuracy of VG Chartz, but they have it selling at .96 m.



http://www.vgchartz.com/games/game.php?id=7703®ion=All

Ary Monteiro Jr
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I don't trust VGChartz, too many stories about them guessing numbers and stuff.



About what Cage said, i truly hope there is a market for more niche titles like HR, maybe publishers will allow developers to take more risks. Note: I don't want traditional games to die, neither think HR is the future or anything, but i enjoyed the game and would like to see more titles exploring (and perfecting) it's ideas.

Christian Nutt
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The tremendous amounts of cynicism this game generates would be amusing if the game weren't so good.

Eddie Vertigo
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Some people took a chance on making an innovative, interactive movie, and it sold better than expected. Ultimately that's a win for us, the consumers, because the more variety in interactive entertainment there is to choose from, the more likely we are to find something that's fun.

steve roger
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Great story game period. A lot of you guys putting it down, I doubt you actually played it. It was not "full" of bugs. We had a clean play through and finished it over two days. It is truly a good story. The question is whether these types of games will sell. It is clear they will. However, I doubt there is going to be story games as good as this one in a long time.

Tyler Peters
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I've had the opp to compare VG Chartz numbers with actual publisher numbers for solds WW (not shipped) on at least a 1/2 dozen properties, and I'm sort of baffled by how VGC does their numbers. In the first 2 instances (this was about 2 years ago) they were low on their overall cross-platform count by about 25%. But the third game I checked was actually over inflated by roughly 15%. This happened again on the fifith game I checked (this time by nearly 20%). The other two games were reported low, by around 20% as I recall.

Thus I'm not too fond of whatever methodologies they using because, at least in my experience, they were not remotely close to the actual numbers.

Christian Nutt
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No, it deserves skepticism, not cynicism. It also deserves critical thinking.

David Delanty
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Hmm, I thought many would be above the mantra "If it didn't break 20 billion sales in its opening seconds, it's a colossal failure." Don't know what business school they attended, but from an objective standpoint Heavy Rain did pretty well. First off, it's an M-rated game, and that's a hefty M slapped onto it, too. Already, you're sitting in a limited market. Secondly, it's releasing alongside Final Fantasy XIII and God of War III. Thirdly, it's an original IP that doesn't have any proven success behind it. Considering all the factors stacked up against it, and the fact it's selling so well (or using Adam Sessler's notorious optimism: "Okay") warrants Heavy Rain to be considered a success.



I don't think the sales themselves send the "very strong message" about innovation. I think that message is better conveyed in the reviews Heavy Rain received. Innovation doesn't mean a thing if your audience doesn't recognize it.

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steve roger
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Bob, I don't think you have actually played Heavy Rain.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnck2oXdxMo&feature=related

Daniel Martinez
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Innovation is a gamble. You can develop something absolutely incredible yet if the variables of the market do not go along accordingly, it can be a huge flop. Luckily for the devs of Heavy Rain, all the right things happened and they were rewarded for their innovation. It brings a smile to my face.

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Amir Sharar
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Perhaps Mr. Cage is speaking in relative terms here. This game doesn't fit into a wildly popular genre at the moment, it faced competition on it's own platform with other 1st party releases (MAG, GoW3, White Knight Chronicles), and it's the sort of game many choose to rent rather than buy.



Perhaps with all of the above considered, it can be considered a sales success.



While I did see that this game was getting a fair bit of pre-release hype from brand loyalists, it was up in the air whether or not the hardcore PS3 fan's excitement would trickle into the general market. I think to some extent it has.



This game, along with MS's Alan Wake, seemed to take a long time to develop and I'm not sure whether the costs were worth the returns. At the same time, both Sony and MS probably seek the sort of diversity these titles add to their first party libraries, even if they do not sell as well as titles from popular genres or IPs.



With other innovations on the horizon in the form of 3D TVs and motion controls, "Dragon Lair-esque" games may have a future. I can imagine playing Heavy Rain with Natal, for example.

mike wallenstein
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Here are the sales charts for the month of Heavy Rain's release:



BIOSHOCK 2* 360 TAKE 2 INTERACTIVE Feb-10 562.9K

NEW SUPER MARIO BROS. WII WII NINTENDO OF AMERICA Nov-09 555.6K 2

CALL OF DUTY: MODERN WARFARE 2* 360 ACTIVISION BLIZZARD Nov-09 314.3K 3

JUST DANCE WII UBISOFT Nov-09 275.4K 4

SPORTS RESORT W/ WII MOTION PLUS* WII NINTENDO OF AMERICA Jul-09 272.5K 5

CALL OF DUTY: MODERN WARFARE 2* PS3 ACTIVISION BLIZZARD Nov-09 252.8K 6

MASS EFFECT 2 360 ELECTRONIC ARTS Jan-10 246.5K 7

DANTE'S INFERNO: DIVINE EDITION PS3 ELECTRONIC ARTS Feb-10 242.5K 8

DANTE'S INFERNO 360 ELECTRONIC ARTS Feb-10 224.7K 9

HEAVY RAIN PS3 SONY Feb-10 219.3K 10



Yeah the game may be in 10th place, but it's right up there with Mass Effect 2, Dante's Inferno, and Call of Duty. In SALES. Every single other game on that list is part of a AAA franchise, or is an easy Wii cash-in (except for Dante's Inferno, the only other original IP debut). Heavy Rain should certainly be proud, for this type of game.

steve roger
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@ Bob dillan



Nope you haven't played the game. That is obvious. Those QTE's are gameplay. Calling someone a fanboy is just immature name calling. Grow up. And speaking of the Sega era, I am confident that I am older and more mature than you.



Back on topic. Here is Mr. Cage discussing the issue.



There is a balance -- there's a certain amount of "gaminess" in the game. Particularly, I'm thinking about things like the power plant: you've got the maze through the tunnel, and the challenge with the wires. How much do you want to stick to gaminess in the design, and how much do you want to back away from it?



DC: I try to back away, but sometimes I feel bad about this and get to feeling I need to do something a little bit more gamey. But I'm happy with the balance in Heavy Rain, because it's almost like a reference to old games, and old adventure games especially. There is also the scene with Manfred when you need to get rid of the fingerprints, which is really --



Which, apparently, I screwed up, but I thought I had gotten it right; but I found out I got into the police station.



DC: You forgot something. Yeah, and that's the kind of gameplay mechanics [we use]. Having a little bit of this is fine when it supports the story -- when it's not just something to keep you busy, when it really means something and has its place in the narrative. That's fine.



@Bob, I think that this comment of yours:



"Anyone who thought heavy rain was a game needs to be taken behind a shed and shot. To put it metaphorically : It's like they took bioware's dialogue system and inserted into a cutscene which you can navigate.



That is not a game, period. It's a computer rendered movie with dialogue tree's."



Is completely wrong. Which s why I said that I don't believe you actually played the game. Because if you actually played through it you would find it a cinematic game and not a dialogue tree. There is some much more to Heavy Rain than your pedantic comments.



You see Mr. Cage didn't mean that there isn't any gameplay when he gave that interview to Destructoid. http://www.destructoid.com/cage-heavy-rain-not-a-videogame-anymor
e-in-my-mind--158115.phtml He meant that this was not a video game in the traditional sense.

gus one
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I love the idea of a 'movie' gamer concept - it could be massive. Why pay to see a movie when you could be in one, so to speak. I'll pay 40 bucks for a week's deep immersion - All I can do is a couple of hours a night gaming. It's a brilliant idea and all I hear are great things about Heavy Rain (oh and I am a career FPSer, so it's nice to have a change of pace).

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Arthur Williams
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Dragon's Lair, Time Gal, and Road Avenger were good to play and watch.

I'd love to see games like those made into cg with way more options.



Seems like some folks have been drinking haterade while talking about Heavy Rain.

steve roger
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This is from Bob dillan's post (27 Mar 2010 at 7:16 PM PST). I am quoting it so that Gamasutra has an opportunity to address it. This kind of acting out is really inappropriate since this is a place where professional come to exchange ideas and comment on Gamasutra reporting. Here is what Bob Dillan said:



"@ steve @ gus



You both don't get it. Steve you are a moron of epic proportions, Heavy rain has way too much QTE in it and it's reminiscent of earlier "movie games" from previous era's.



Look at what the guy says here:



"Cage says, there's simply no other way to tell a story but through cut-scenes. "



What a crock of shit!! The guy has no legitimacy what-so-ever.



Heavy Rain missed one of the two cruxes of video game development. Yes, a drive for art and storytelling in the medium is important, and I appreciate the attempt that they've tried to integrate the two, but the second pillar, the most important pillar, is whether or not the gameplay is fun. Fun enough to do it over and over again. Pressing the right button on the controller as it appears on the screen has never been an engrossing mechanic, and is rarely something I want to do more than once."



Bob dillan's derogatory remarks toward Mr. Cage are unprofessional and uncalled for and he has completely taken what Mr. Cage said out of context.



Here is what Mr. Cage actually said:



"Using the term 'interactive movie' to describe Heavy Rain has been a tricky question from the beginning," he continues. "It is in many ways what Heavy Rain is -- a visually told story that the player can affect by his actions."



But he's quick to distance himself a bit from the term, mostly due to the negative connotation gamers might have. Early "interactive movies" would offer up a series of scenes for players, offering them mostly meaningless choices from time to time. Despite the fact that Heavy Rain offers a very different experience to those "interactive movies" of old, Quantic Dream still had to field negative comments from people ignorant to how to the game is actually experience. To many people, Cage says, there's simply no other way to tell a story but through cut-scenes.



"In Heavy Rain, the player is in control second to second," he explains, "he tells the story through his actions. All this is done in a very fluid, seamless way, with no cut scenes, no big flashing sign to make decisions, and this is what makes the game really unique."



----



Clearly Bob Dillan has no idea what he has been talking about and it is very proof has not played the game at all. Bob Dillan believes that Cage's Heavy Rain story is told through cut scenes. However, that isn't is the case. Here is what Bob Dillan wrote:



"Anyone who thought heavy rain was a game needs to be taken behind a shed and shot. To put it metaphorically : It's like they took bioware's dialogue system and inserted into a cutscene which you can navigate.



That is not a game, period. It's a computer rendered movie with dialogue tree's."



Again, Bob dillan did not play the game. His comments should be ignored or better yet removed entirely.



Many of us have great respect for David Cage and what he has accomplished with Heavy Rain. And even if you didn't like Heavy Rain that isn't justification to flame and troll in the comment section of Gamasutra.

Tim Carter
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People who get into arguments here about Heavy Rain are missing the point utterly.



(Why are game developers so myopic?)



The point isn't Heavy Rain. It's innovation. It's about taking a chance on something new. It's New Game X - whatever New Game X is. To get into some argument about whether a game made yesterday constitutes innovation or not isn't what's being discussed here. The topic on the table is innovation for games of tomorrow.

Prash Nelson-Smythe
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Tim,



The argument seems to be about whether or not Heavy Rain is actually innovative and therefore whether or not its sales send a message about innovation. I have not played it but from what I've seen I think that the extent to which HR is innovative has been somewhat overstated partly because the genre died out a long time ago and was largely forgotten about. That's not to say that there isn't a place for this type of game. It seems to be the highest quality game created for its genre. Therefore, I'd suggest that the reasonable (considering the massive hype) sales of Heavy Rain say send more of a message about quality movie-games than about innovation.



I'd be willing to reassess this opinion after actually playing the game but to be honest I'm never going to play it. The premise doesn't appeal to me and I've never even seen a PS3.

Mark Raymond
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What I'd like to know is how many people have already traded it in. I've heard really interesting things about the game, but it strikes me as something with absolutely zero replay value and little longevity.

Luis Guimaraes
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Poor Mirror's Edge.

gus one
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I like Mirrors Edge. Still enjoying working my way through it at a leisurely pace. I bought my copy of Heavy Rain off Ebay and I cannot imagine alot of replayability once you know who the killer is. But that isnt the point. It's the same about watching movie. You wouldn't want to watch it again straight away anyway. Expand it wilth DLC content and revive the whole game movie genre. Get quality script writers in and it's got legs.

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Ara Shirinian
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Going back to the subject of the article, I don't believe that sales results of any single game can really send any durable message about "innovation" one way or the other. At best all it can tell us is the palatability of that particular game in that particular point in time to the buying public.



The irony of this situation is that the mechanical structure of Heavy Rain isn't all that innovative in the scope of video game history. However, it is innovative in the sense that nobody has made a product with this type of structure _and_ such high production values before. Plus, this type of product has largely been abandoned in recent years (especially in visibility to the public), long enough for most people to have forgotten its predecessors, so the old feels new again to many people.



I would say also that on the atomic scale, there are particular elements in Heavy Rain that are innovative and good, and others that are innovative and bad. (and still others that are just pedestrian)



'Innovation' by itself is insufficient to denote anything meaningful. There has to be another component of value alongside it to give the innovation itself value.

steve roger
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I do agree Mark that replay value is low. Not because you can't actually play through again and make different choice, but immersion is lost once you know the story and what is going to happen next. It is like giving a book a second read through or going to a movie and then watching it again. Which is why the only way for Heavy Rain to maintain it's relevance in your game collection and not trade it in is for the developer to offer episodic DLC.



But be assurred that this is not a story told in cut scenes and that is where the innovation comes through. If you want to get a good idea what this game like I suggest just hoping onto Youtube and watch a variety of videos on it. You will be surprised at how much work went into creating this story game.



Like Ara said:



"However, it is innovative in the sense that nobody has made a product with this type of structure _and_ such high production values before. Plus, this type of product has largely been abandoned in recent years (especially in visibility to the public), long enough for most people to have forgotten its predecessors, so the old feels new again to many people."



I totally agree with this.



Anyway, I am not here to argue about HR but rather to set the record straight. David Cage said that that there would be people who are ignorant about what HR is and offers who have never played the game and that those people really would poison the well before people could approach the game on the game's own terms. This is what Bob dillan has been doing. He has been skewering HR without actually know what HR is and telling people to avoid it. That is just plain wrong.

Charles Forbin
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>>> passive gaming crowd who suck at games and just

>>> want a soother in their mouth as they digest more

>>> passive movie like experiences with only the barest

>>> amount of interaction.



Sorry, Bob, but there's a whole spectrum of desire out there when it comes to gaming or anything. Some folks enjoy light comedy, other need Lenny Bruce and George Carlin injected directly into their veins. Same for gaming. It's OK for some folks to not be "hard core" as I think the little kids call it these days.



>>> Anyone who thought heavy rain was a game needs

>>> to be taken behind a shed and shot.



Good gravy, Bob, did Cage run over your dog or something?



I rented HR and found it interesting, but ultimately it didn't pull me in and I went back to finish Demon's Souls. I can still appreciate it from an experimental angle. If any game made me wish death upon people who had a different opinion about it I'd be seeking psychological treatment. Cripes, how do you react when someone has an opinion you don't like an actual serious subject? The health care bill must have had you waving around a rifle in a clock tower.

Charles Forbin
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>>> Why pay to see a movie when you could be in one, so to speak.



The old movie based on Fahrenheit 451 had a scene where the main character's wife acts out a role that's part of a television program, although it's pretty crude. Don't recall if that scene was in Bradbury's original or not. Maybe we all need to calm down and go read a nice book. :-)

Christopher Wragg
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Innovation, an interesting topic of discussion these days. Taking an old concept and building something entirely new out of it is indeed innovation. Effectively they took two time old concepts, adventure stories and cinematic scripted events and mashed them together in a heretofore unprecedented fashion. That folks, is innovation. What was the gas oven if not a combination of gas lighters and the woods stove, the tv was a melding of photography and radio into something entirely new. Everything we do is predicated on history, simply because something is based heavily, does not exclude the possibility of innovation.



Also, to the people calling it a QTE-fest. At what point does a QTE become a context sensitive action, by the end of the game you could play most of it without seeing a QTE, to slide open a door, you slide the direction the door opens, to pull open it's up to grab and swing outward to open. Additionally, while much of the action is scripted, the amount that you do or see, and the wild differences in action make this far more than just a cutscene, not to mention that failure doesn't simply result in restarting as many QTE laden games do.



Overall, while not for everyone, it's detractors overstate the issue far too often, without offering much in the way of constructive criticism. For the people this game was made for, myself included, it was a great success.

Ashok Meena
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I am looking forward to play it next weekend. :)

Benjamin Marchand
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There is a huge, massive amount of work on this one (I dare you to produce a game that doesn't have any "game over" or "restart at X point after dying"), which just deserves respect.



Overacting some skepticism just for balancing their confidence about originality is not deserved and not honest here, imo.



Oh, and kudos to Quantic Dream (I'm following them since Nomad Soul), who are the type of people who THINK before producing.

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Benjamin Marchand
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P.S : trolling is not welcomed anywhere Bob Dillan. Especially on professional boards.

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Benjamin Marchand
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Well, I just found your interventions a bit extreme for the subject, that's all.



Also, all the reported critics on the Wikipedia page ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heavy_Rain ) are about 8 to 9.5 of 10 ...

Ayotunde Ayoko
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i am really glad it's doing well... :)



and yeah, i believe the game is innovative - it's very different from the usual type of games we get to play currently...i doff my hat at 'Cage and co for taking the leap...i think all game developers should take a cue from these guys; do something different, do something that makes you happy...i think that's what matters. :)

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Benjamin Marchand
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@bob



I understand what you mean about users "trying to convice" others to follow their taste.

Also, I just read a few user critics on metacritic.com, and honestly, the bad scores don't feel very objective, nor professional.

For example, one gives 3/10 just because the killer is not the one he wanted to be O_O

Overall, most of the bad scores are made because of that : they expected a better scenario than any actual best film noir ... Just like if one movie reviewer was putting a bad score to Avatar because it doesn't have enough interactivity ...

I mean, this is where those user reviews are not professional, and therefore not as important as pro critics. Some of them just don't know how to judge a game, because they take personal expectations for common ones.

Lol, seriously, some users are putting 3/10 because "voice acting is not good" (I'm serious) ...



Just like in painting, movies, and music, user metacritic is one thing, but professional metacritic is by far more reliable and more objective.





Another example : look for World of Warcraft : Wrath of the Lich King user score ...

Some people put it a zero just because they didn't have their epics last night ...

Prash Nelson-Smythe
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I think what Bob is getting at is that from the point of view of game professionals, it is the user's experience they should be looking at, not the professional reviewers opinion, and that user reviews can be a rough guide for this. There is no objective "quality" of an opinion and professional reviews are not worth more than consumer reviews. In fact they are worth less since there are far fewer professional reviewers than consumers. Most of us only find them useful because we have individual tastes closer to the typical reviewer than the typical customer.



It all comes down to whether you are making games for. Everyone? A niche? Your peers? Yourself? People ascribe lofty values to the desire to make games for yourself by "doing what you love" etc. but an equally if not more valid way to look at that is to say it is selfish and rarely produces lasting art. If you're going to make games which are "personal" in this sense don't expect them to sell well or trumpet them as the future of gaming, while normal folks come away from it disappointed. Ultimately, sales are the most accurate democratic indicator of quality.

Prash Nelson-Smythe
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Benjamin,



Indeed there are complaints and "protest reviews" for Wrath of the Lich King. The thing is that Blizzard will hear these complaints and try to take them into account in future (not an easy task to please everyone obviously) and this is what sets them apart from many other companies. The know the customer is the boss and they are massively successful for it.



On the other hand, the average professional rating for the original game and 2 expansions has remained almost constant, yet WoW's popularity is diminishing. What is reliable and objective about that?

Tom Newman
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I played Simon in the 80's, and I read choose your own adventure novels too. I played Heavy Rain myself before coming to the conclusion that is it a cross between these two old school forms of entertainment. I'm missing what makes this so innovative.

Benjamin Marchand
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@Prash : Yes, of course, user feedback is very, very important. But here, I'm really speaking of pure score numbers.

A user having to address an issue at some part of a game doesn't necessarily mean to put a 0/10 on the whole work.

As there is a whole world between an absolute random user notation and his experience feedback, there is not such a gross contrast with pro reviews. This is what I call unobjective, and to an extent, childish.

Users don't know how to handle the score weapon for the most.

Here, some people were putting a lot of importance in Heavy Rain global user score. More than pro critics ones.



And here is why I think this is not quite right ;)

Prash Nelson-Smythe
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I agree that the actual number only provides a crude representation of user opinion. But even that is more important than professional review scores. Remember, there is no objective scale of quality and you only look at scores to discover the opinion of a group or individual. Whose opinion are you most interested as a game maker?



And besides, the effect is balanced out somewhat by the fact that people who like a game will often rate it 10 in the user opinions. Also, naturally the stronger opinions are the ones that are more likely to motivate the user into writing a review in the first place so they will always tend to give the impression of polarised opinion. The most useful way of interpreting each user opinion is working out if it means they wouldn't have bought the game in hindsight or they are less likely to buy future products from the same company. A zero score means they are less likely to buy more or to recommend the game.

John Mawhorter
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It isn't innovative in the sense of creating any new game mechanics, but the fact that an interactive movie was released/developed at all is a good thing, even if the plot sucks.

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steve roger
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"Bob dillan

29 Mar 2010 at 3:08 am PST

@Charles



My criticism is for those who buy mediocre games thereby sending the message that MEDIOCRE GAMES are OK TO PRODUCE.



And heavy rain was as mediocre as they come, the "innovation" people are lauding is nonsense because these people have _no taste_ in _quality_ to begin with. "



LOL. Criticizing the end users "taste." You ought to leave the video games market immediately and take up fashion.

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steve roger
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RE: Bob



Shut up. Grow up. And go away.


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