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Quality of Life platform - What could it mean?
by James Coote on 01/30/14 09:00:00 am   Featured Blogs

The following blog post, unless otherwise noted, was written by a member of Gamasutra’s community.
The thoughts and opinions expressed are those of the writer and not Gamasutra or its parent company.

 

I should preface this by saying I'm coming from a purely games industry perspective here. I have no insight into health and fitness industry or related products aside from my own experiences as a consumer.

According to recent reports, Nintendo are planning a new "Quality of Life" platform. Quite what that means is a bit vague at the moment, but here are a few examples of the sort of problems/people/products that Nintendo (or indeed other companies in the games industry) can solve in the health and fitness sphere:

Elderly

In rich, developed countries, there is a huge demographic shift towards ageing populations, and it's already well under way. The "baby boomer" generation, born after World War II are reaching retirement age. Improvements in healthcare mean that they will live longer, and so be a bigger drain on pension funds, government social welfare programs. They will also be spending more on those increasingly advanced healthcare systems that are keeping them alive.

At the same time, they hold a larger proportion of the wealth than younger generations, who in turn are smaller in number. The tax receipts generated by the working population is going down at the same time that costs are going up.

This trend is most accute in Japan, and as a Japanese company, Nintendo will be aware of the anxieties around this issue in the general population. But it also afflicts countries like Germany, with it's declining birth rate, China with it's only-recently relaxed one-child policy, and in countries like the UK, where it is only recent waves of migration that are masking the effect.

From time to time, here in the UK, we see on the news a feature about a new kooky looking robot from Japan, which claims it will be the care home worker of the future. Whilst it's easy to get cynical about such ideas, there is definitely a huge market for products that will help the elderly in some way. Whether it be straight up monitoring devices, devices to keep the elderly active (and so healthier), or a combination of both.

Nintendo saw a huge surprise hit with older people in the form of it's Brain Training game for DS, which espouses mental stimulation as a way for the elderly to keep their minds active and healthy. The precipitous rise in cases of Altzheimer's/Dementia is a particular worry for many older people and healthcare professionals, and traditional forms of staying mentally sharp in old age, such as chess or bridge, can all be enhanced by taking them into the digital age, even where frail individuals aren't necessarily being encouraged to fling their limbs around.

On the monitoring side, there are simply less of the younger generation around to wait hand and foot on the elderly, make sure they are ok and generally look after them. A console-like quality of life monitoring device might not be able to dress a person, tuck them into bed, or help them go to the toilet, but it will help doctors and carers remotely assess patients needs.

Moreover, the scale of demand for these devices means it now makes sense to bring them out of the rarified world of medical equipment and into the realms of mainstream consumer device. Nintendo could offer, using it's knowledge in mass-produced consoles, something people can buy from a regular department store, for hundreds, rather than thousands of dollars, easily and quickly install in their elderly parent's home, and teach their relatives to use.

Fitness Enthusiasts

There is a group of people for whom health and fitness is a way of life. They are athletes, personal trainers or people for whom fitness is their primary passtime. Not only do they have the full gym membership, but in many cases, have all the associated gear at their own home.

Gamification has long been a part of the fitness scene, with devices sporting indicators of how many calories have been burned, or miles run/cycled, for decades. Today we live in a data rich world, with a profusion of sensors and devices recording a plethora of stats on our physical state and activities. A console-like device would make an excellent central hub for all this information; the "brains" behind a gym of interconnected devices.

The success of games like Wii-Fit and Zumba show that there is a huge demand for "interactive-lite" workout videos / games, and it's easy to imagine giving them their own dedicated console device. Reskinning it to be purely health and fitness might further encourage purchases from consumers who don't want all the baggage and associations that come with buying a device advertised as primarily for games.

I do however think that Nintendo will be making a massive mistake if they fail to embrace connected smartphones and wearable tech. Whilst right now, the smartphone is the weapon of choice for the joggers and sports-people when out and about, that could easily change with the arrival of Google Glasses. Consumers will fully expect seamless integration of their outside activity data with that generated in-home and at the gym. Any device that fails to do that job of pulling together all their disparate activities will fail in its primary mission of being the centre of someone's fitness world.

For sports, it also makes just so much more sense to have a console-like base unit, onto which you can attach the specialist peripheral-sensors needed for the specific sport, and on which can be run whatever specific software / app that sport needs.

Nintendo have already been doing this with their wide range of Wii and Wii-U Fit extras, and there is definitely scope to take this approach up-market and sell direct to sports clubs, and professional and amateur sports-people and athletes. (In fact, Microsoft would have an advantage here were they to also enter the market with a reskinned/branded Xbox One plus Kinect, pitched as a Golf/Tennis swing analyser, for example).

The Guilty Unfit

Many people are aware their sedentry lifestyle of driving to work, sitting at an office desk all day, then going home to watch the TV or play video games isn't healthy. But damnit, it's cold and raining outside, and their favourite film is about to start on TV, and it's already 8pm and dark outside.

The game Zombies, Run! is a fantastic example of motivating people in a fun way to get off the couch and go burn some calories, where the usual guilty feelings for not having done enough exercise, or overzealous fitness fanatics telling them to get fit for the sheer masochistic joy of physical exertion, just aren't getting them to slip on their trainers.

This quote from an interview with the makers of Zombies, Run! really exemplifies the point:

"It’s just really surprising because we tell people about this at conferences that storytelling can be really valuable," he said. "And it's just…they cannot comprehend it. They get badges and they get points and all this other gamification stuff. But they don’t get stories, and that’s partly because if you are naturally quite fit, or you are quite fit, you don’t need a story--you just go and run. But for everyone else, it’s a bit different."

Here, Nintendo has a real strength to bring to the table, in the form of it's story-writing, world and character creation abilities. Key will be striking a balance. On the one hand, making fun and entertaining games first and foremost, that in turn encourage physical activity through their mechanics. As well, avoiding trying to gamify fitness by crudely replacing Wii-fit lady with Mario. But importantly, not trying to hide and deceive the players. Being upfront that this is a fitness game, but one that revels in it's sense of fun.


Why care?

Each of the above probably needs a different product, (even if it's the same physical hardware/OS underneath, but with different branding/marketing and selection of software). Right now, there is a big question mark as to which of those Nintendo are aiming for, or whether they are approaching a "Quality of Life" product from a completely different angle.

Obviously, if any of this takes off, many game developers might find themselves making the apps / games to go on these devices. At a deeper level though, it's going beyond gamification, or the idea games are something everyone can enjoy. Rather, it starts to break down the usefulness of classing things in terms of "Game" or "Not a Game", and in a much more tangible, real-world way than the academic-intellectual debate about art-games like Proteus or Dear Esther.

This is all a whole lot of if's, but just could have radical ramifications for how we view our industry
 


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Comments


SD Marlow
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I stopped reading at robot because up to that point it was exactly the kind of platform you were describing. The Sony Aibo didn't do well as a product, but was still hugely popular. I can totally see Nintendo launching something like that. An interactive AI companion with network access to thousands of learned behaviors? Quite doable. Will Google get their first and corrupt the idea in order to earn more in targeted marketing revenue? Quite possibly.

James Coote
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I know the article is a bit TL:DR, but robots wasn't really what I was getting at. Thinking more monitoring devices.

Say you reskinned an Xbox One (with Kinect) to sit in an elderly person's front room. It could let relatives, carers and health professionals see the person and chat to them. It could detect if the elderly person hasn't been into the room at all that day (perhaps indicating something is wrong), could listen out for sounds of someone in distress (from having had a fall or something like that), or equally be linked to one of those emergency alarms fail or vulnerable people often have. When the elderly person hits their alarm, whoever is at the other end can quickly log on to the monitoring device and assess the situation in the time it takes assistance to get to the property.

All that for a $400 one time investment, and it quickly becomes highly cost effective, both for healthcare providers and relatives looking for piece of mind.

Probably the primary concern would be ensuring the elderly person feels comfortable with it, and not like their doctor/relatives are spying on them. Making it a device they actively use, by sticking brain training games on it, having their TV piped through it, is one way to make sure they don't just unplug the power cable when no one's looking

Jonathan Murphy
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You want quality of life do two things. Cheat devices like Game Genie, and no achievements.

Adam Campbell
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I'd love to see how Nintendo could potentially integrate their platforms/software into gyms and fitness suites. There's always scope for a new approach when it comes to the equipment we use.


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