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Judy Tyrer's Blog

 

Founder of 3 Turn Productions LLC and creator of Ever, Jane: The virtual world of Jane Austen, Judy Tyrer would have decided to become a game developer had she known that as an option at the age of 9 when she first tried to figure out how to build a robot that would play games with her.  She did not succeed, but her passion for games never faltered.  After graduating from SMU with a double major in English Literature and Secondary Education (with a minor in Geology), Judy started in the Serious Games Business at Control Data Corporation where she had the unique privilege of workong on PLATO, a computer based education system.

From there Judy moved into the computer industry working on distributed UNIX operating systems, specialing in File Systems.  During this time she served on the File System Consortium for the Open Software Foundation (OSF).  Her paper, "Adding Tightly Consistent Replication to OSF's DFS" was published by Uniform.

During the www.yourjobhasgonetoindia.com period, which decimated the enterprise software industry in the US, Judy decided to go back to her game playing robot fantasies and joined the game industry. Judy worked at Ubisoft on the Ghost Recon series as a network engineer and mutli-player engine specialist.  From Ubisoft, Judy moved to Sony Online Entertainment as Lead Engineer for the Denver office.  She was then tapped by Linden Labs as Senior Engineering Manager for the Engine Room, the team responsible for the Second Life Servers.

Ever, Jane: the virtual world of Jane Austen just met its kickstarter goals at the end of 2013 and is scheduled to launch January, 2016.

 

Member Blogs

Posted by Judy Tyrer on Fri, 31 Jan 2014 07:59:00 EST in Business/Marketing
A discussion of how distributed development enhances communication within the team and other reasons for ending the lock-step commute to the office.



Judy Tyrer's Comments

Comment In: [Blog - 06/26/2014 - 03:53]

In one studio, all the ...

In one studio, all the designers knew how to script and spent their days scripting. In another studio the designers went for long lunches and hung out in the dev mgr 's office so much that they had the reputation of doing absolutely nothing and I have no evidence that ...

Comment In: [Blog - 06/13/2014 - 03:59]

Send your sister my way. ...

Send your sister my way. She is my target market and my goal is to open the gaming market to people who would love to play games if there were games designed specifically for them. I get a LOT of people who have never gamed before. Now to finish this ...

Comment In: [Blog - 05/27/2014 - 05:44]

This is so great I ...

This is so great I just finished the fist draft of my business plan about 18 mos. late but I didn 't need it until now and the parts on marketing were challenging. Saving this to devour when I write the next draft. I know how to set up server ...

Comment In: [Blog - 05/27/2014 - 09:53]

Excellent article. I just advised ...

Excellent article. I just advised a team on their upcoming kickstarter and felt like hanging my head in shame. I thought we were handling our company very professionally and like a business, but this team was amazing. They had their process nailed and could talk about it effectively, they knew ...

Comment In: [Blog - 05/22/2014 - 09:38]

I agree with you that ...

I agree with you that there are more valuable methodologies for game development than just SCRUM. And if you take LEAN and apply it to the pipeline then I 'm okay with it, but defining the only work to be done as that which benefits the customer is not a ...

Comment In: [Blog - 05/15/2014 - 11:49]

I feel like I should ...

I feel like I should have this tattooed on my forehead and then I can just put a picture up every time. r n r nFIT THE PROCESS TO THE PROJECT r n r nSCRUM is great for projects with unknown requirements and minimal research needs that can still afford ...