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Judy Tyrer's Blog

 

Founder of 3 Turn Productions LLC and creator of Ever, Jane: The virtual world of Jane Austen, Judy Tyrer would have decided to become a game developer had she known that as an option at the age of 9 when she first tried to figure out how to build a robot that would play games with her.  She did not succeed, but her passion for games never faltered.  After graduating from SMU with a double major in English Literature and Secondary Education (with a minor in Geology), Judy started in the Serious Games Business at Control Data Corporation where she had the unique privilege of workong on PLATO, a computer based education system.

From there Judy moved into the computer industry working on distributed UNIX operating systems, specialing in File Systems.  During this time she served on the File System Consortium for the Open Software Foundation (OSF).  Her paper, "Adding Tightly Consistent Replication to OSF's DFS" was published by Uniform.

During the www.yourjobhasgonetoindia.com period, which decimated the enterprise software industry in the US, Judy decided to go back to her game playing robot fantasies and joined the game industry. Judy worked at Ubisoft on the Ghost Recon series as a network engineer and mutli-player engine specialist.  From Ubisoft, Judy moved to Sony Online Entertainment as Lead Engineer for the Denver office.  She was then tapped by Linden Labs as Senior Engineering Manager for the Engine Room, the team responsible for the Second Life Servers.

Ever, Jane: the virtual world of Jane Austen just met its kickstarter goals at the end of 2013 and is scheduled to launch January, 2016.

 

Member Blogs

Posted by Judy Tyrer on Fri, 31 Jan 2014 07:59:00 EST in Business/Marketing
A discussion of how distributed development enhances communication within the team and other reasons for ending the lock-step commute to the office.



Judy Tyrer's Comments

Comment In: [News - 12/05/2014 - 01:26]

It 's not surprising since ...

It 's not surprising since the AAA studios seem to be stuck in sequel hell. Have we seen anything terribly original from any of them lately

Comment In: [News - 12/08/2014 - 04:00]

There are so many places ...

There are so many places to look for the core problem but I believe the biggest problem is that these are publicly traded companies and thus slaves to quarterly earnings reports. It encourages short term thinking. Short term thinking leads to caring less about the customer and caring more about ...

Comment In: [Blog - 11/13/2014 - 02:40]

This advice is good. Everyone ...

This advice is good. Everyone of our team members sort of adopts one of the platforms and we are just ourselves on them, talking about our work and sharing. People seem to like that better than advertising. I know I do.

Comment In: [Blog - 10/28/2014 - 02:14]

I would modify this to ...

I would modify this to say unless you are a known name OR have a unique game . A truely unique game will get a lot of press, a LOT I think there are more than 80 articles on Ever,Jane from our Kickstarter campaign but it was because it is ...

Comment In: [News - 10/09/2014 - 06:13]

Given the cost of hiring, ...

Given the cost of hiring, it is often more cost effective to let employees hang out on the beach for awhile between projects. It 's part altruistic and part just good business sense, especially for senior people with hard to replace skills. r n r nI don 't have a ...

Comment In: [Blog - 08/04/2014 - 09:14]

I contest this article 's ...

I contest this article 's basic premise that the difference between a studio and someone just making a game is brick mortar. Distributed development allows us to work as a team remotely from one another without the overhead of brick mortar. I can 't fathom why people still do the ...