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September 20, 2014
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Alex Fleetwood's Blog   Expert Blogs

 

Alex Fleetwood is the founder & director of Hide&Seek, a design studio working at the point where games meet culture. 

Hide&Seek started life in 2007 as a festival of social games and playful experiences on London’s South Bank. Our aim was to create an environment where anyone who wanted to could experiment with making games, and where adults were invited to play together in public. The festival was transformative for us, our first experience of creating public play, and feedback from players was amazing; and so the studio was born.

In the last five years, we’ve worked with a wildly diverse range of clients and partners. We’ve made an iOS arcade game for the Royal Opera House, consulted on gamification for clients such as eBay, Cadbury and the BBC, produced transmedia projects for Warner Bros., Wieden & Kennedy and Film4, and made our own games like the Boardgame Remix Kit, Drunk Dungeon and Searchlight.

We continue to produce a range of events for public spaces – we’ve had 12,000 people playing in the streets of Edinburgh on New Years’ Day, made a building come alive with play for Gaîté Lyrique in Paris, and placed 99 Tiny Games right across London. And we support the work of other makers through the Sandpit (a thriving network of games-makers) and the Hide&Seek Weekender (an annual festival of playing in public).

 

Expert Blogs

Posted by Alex Fleetwood on Thu, 21 Mar 2013 08:14:00 EDT in Business/Marketing, Smartphone/Tablet
A post about all the rewards Hide&Seek designed for their Kickstarter that stayed on the cutting-room floor.


Posted by Alex Fleetwood on Fri, 08 Feb 2013 07:39:00 EST in Business/Marketing, Smartphone/Tablet
A first post for Gamasutra from Alex Fleetwood, founder of UK game studio Hide&Seek, reflecting on Paolo Pedercini's Indiecade talk Toward Independence and describing their own efforts to move beyond working for clients.